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Dr. Donald  Blair  Md image

Dr. Donald Blair Md

1301 Punchbowl St
Honolulu HI 96813
808 219-9551
Medical School: Columbia University College Of Physicians And Surgeons - 1995
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #:
NPI: 1477523710
Taxonomy Codes:
174400000X 2085R0202X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Donald Blair is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:36558 Description:Insert tunneled cv cath Average Price:$903.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$279.35
HCPCS Code:36147 Description:Access av dial grft for eval Average Price:$589.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$95.39
HCPCS Code:32422 Description:Thoracentesis w/tube insert Average Price:$392.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$123.90
HCPCS Code:49083 Description:Abd paracentesis w/imaging Average Price:$333.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$110.86
HCPCS Code:71275 Description:Ct angiography chest Average Price:$301.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$96.25
HCPCS Code:32405 Description:Percut bx lung/mediastinum Average Price:$307.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$104.94
HCPCS Code:74177 Description:Ct abd & pelv w/contrast Average Price:$277.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$87.70
HCPCS Code:74176 Description:Ct abd & pelvis Average Price:$264.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$85.57
HCPCS Code:71260 Description:Ct thorax w/dye Average Price:$195.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$56.84
HCPCS Code:10022 Description:Fna w/image Average Price:$203.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$65.81
HCPCS Code:75989 Description:Abscess drainage under x-ray Average Price:$185.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$58.98
HCPCS Code:77012 Description:Ct scan for needle biopsy Average Price:$180.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$57.33
HCPCS Code:72131 Description:Ct lumbar spine w/o dye Average Price:$160.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$46.34
HCPCS Code:71250 Description:Ct thorax w/o dye Average Price:$160.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$47.65
HCPCS Code:72125 Description:Ct neck spine w/o dye Average Price:$160.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$48.12
HCPCS Code:70450 Description:Ct head/brain w/o dye Average Price:$132.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$39.76
HCPCS Code:76770 Description:Us exam abdo back wall comp Average Price:$115.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$36.05
HCPCS Code:93970 Description:Extremity study Average Price:$107.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$34.24
HCPCS Code:76942 Description:Echo guide for biopsy Average Price:$105.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$33.97
HCPCS Code:93880 Description:Extracranial study Average Price:$94.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$30.41
HCPCS Code:76705 Description:Echo exam of abdomen Average Price:$92.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$29.44
HCPCS Code:93925 Description:Lower extremity study Average Price:$90.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$28.94
HCPCS Code:76536 Description:Us exam of head and neck Average Price:$87.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$28.02
HCPCS Code:93971 Description:Extremity study Average Price:$71.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$28.93
HCPCS Code:77001 Description:Fluoroguide for vein device Average Price:$60.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$19.15
HCPCS Code:76937 Description:Us guide vascular access Average Price:$47.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$15.25
HCPCS Code:74020 Description:X-ray exam of abdomen Average Price:$42.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$13.36
HCPCS Code:93922 Description:Upr/l xtremity art 2 levels Average Price:$38.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.28
HCPCS Code:72100 Description:X-ray exam of lower spine Average Price:$37.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.74
HCPCS Code:73510 Description:X-ray exam of hip Average Price:$36.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.40
HCPCS Code:73510 Description:X-ray exam of hip Average Price:$36.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.40
HCPCS Code:71020 Description:Chest x-ray Average Price:$34.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$10.87
HCPCS Code:71020 Description:Chest x-ray Average Price:$34.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$10.87
HCPCS Code:73030 Description:X-ray exam of shoulder Average Price:$31.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.60
HCPCS Code:73562 Description:X-ray exam of knee 3 Average Price:$31.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.98
HCPCS Code:73562 Description:X-ray exam of knee 3 Average Price:$31.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.98
HCPCS Code:72170 Description:X-ray exam of pelvis Average Price:$29.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.25
HCPCS Code:73560 Description:X-ray exam of knee 1 or 2 Average Price:$29.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.50
HCPCS Code:73550 Description:X-ray exam of thigh Average Price:$28.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$8.79
HCPCS Code:74000 Description:X-ray exam of abdomen Average Price:$28.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.11
HCPCS Code:71010 Description:Chest x-ray Average Price:$28.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.11
HCPCS Code:73630 Description:X-ray exam of foot Average Price:$27.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$8.38
HCPCS Code:73610 Description:X-ray exam of ankle Average Price:$27.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$8.77
HCPCS Code:73590 Description:X-ray exam of lower leg Average Price:$27.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$8.77
HCPCS Code:77051 Description:Computer dx mammogram add-on Average Price:$9.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.07

HCPCS Code Definitions

74000
Radiologic examination, abdomen; single anteroposterior view
73630
Radiologic examination, foot; complete, minimum of 3 views
32405
Biopsy, lung or mediastinum, percutaneous needle
10022
Fine needle aspiration; with imaging guidance
36147
Introduction of needle and/or catheter, arteriovenous shunt created for dialysis (graft/fistula); initial access with complete radiological evaluation of dialysis access, including fluoroscopy, image documentation and report (includes access of shunt, injection[s] of contrast, and all necessary imaging from the arterial anastomosis and adjacent artery through entire venous outflow including the inferior or superior vena cava)
70450
Computed tomography, head or brain; without contrast material
72131
Computed tomography, lumbar spine; without contrast material
36558
Insertion of tunneled centrally inserted central venous catheter, without subcutaneous port or pump; age 5 years or older
49083
Abdominal paracentesis (diagnostic or therapeutic); with imaging guidance
72125
Computed tomography, cervical spine; without contrast material
71010
Radiologic examination, chest; single view, frontal
71250
Computed tomography, thorax; without contrast material
71020
Radiologic examination, chest, 2 views, frontal and lateral
71020
Radiologic examination, chest, 2 views, frontal and lateral
73610
Radiologic examination, ankle; complete, minimum of 3 views
72100
Radiologic examination, spine, lumbosacral; 2 or 3 views
71260
Computed tomography, thorax; with contrast material(s)
71275
Computed tomographic angiography, chest (noncoronary), with contrast material(s), including noncontrast images, if performed, and image postprocessing
73510
Radiologic examination, hip, unilateral; complete, minimum of 2 views
73030
Radiologic examination, shoulder; complete, minimum of 2 views
73510
Radiologic examination, hip, unilateral; complete, minimum of 2 views
72170
Radiologic examination, pelvis; 1 or 2 views
73590
Radiologic examination; tibia and fibula, 2 views
73562
Radiologic examination, knee; 3 views
73560
Radiologic examination, knee; 1 or 2 views
73550
Radiologic examination, femur, 2 views
73562
Radiologic examination, knee; 3 views
76937
Ultrasound guidance for vascular access requiring ultrasound evaluation of potential access sites, documentation of selected vessel patency, concurrent realtime ultrasound visualization of vascular needle entry, with permanent recording and reporting (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
74177
Computed tomography, abdomen and pelvis; with contrast material(s)
74176
Computed tomography, abdomen and pelvis; without contrast material
74020
Radiologic examination, abdomen; complete, including decubitus and/or erect views
75989
Radiological guidance (ie, fluoroscopy, ultrasound, or computed tomography), for percutaneous drainage (eg, abscess, specimen collection), with placement of catheter, radiological supervision and interpretation
76770
Ultrasound, retroperitoneal (eg, renal, aorta, nodes), real time with image documentation; complete
77051
Computer-aided detection (computer algorithm analysis of digital image data for lesion detection) with further review for interpretation, with or without digitization of film radiographic images; diagnostic mammography (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
76705
Ultrasound, abdominal, real time with image documentation; limited (eg, single organ, quadrant, follow-up)
76536
Ultrasound, soft tissues of head and neck (eg, thyroid, parathyroid, parotid), real time with image documentation
77012
Computed tomography guidance for needle placement (eg, biopsy, aspiration, injection, localization device), radiological supervision and interpretation
76942
Ultrasonic guidance for needle placement (eg, biopsy, aspiration, injection, localization device), imaging supervision and interpretation
77001
Fluoroscopic guidance for central venous access device placement, replacement (catheter only or complete), or removal (includes fluoroscopic guidance for vascular access and catheter manipulation, any necessary contrast injections through access site or catheter with related venography radiologic supervision and interpretation, and radiographic documentation of final catheter position) (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
93925
Duplex scan of lower extremity arteries or arterial bypass grafts; complete bilateral study
93922
Limited bilateral noninvasive physiologic studies of upper or lower extremity arteries, (eg, for lower extremity: ankle/brachial indices at distal posterior tibial and anterior tibial/dorsalis pedis arteries plus bidirectional, Doppler waveform recording and analysis at 1-2 levels, or ankle/brachial indices at distal posterior tibial and anterior tibial/dorsalis pedis arteries plus volume plethysmography at 1-2 levels, or ankle/brachial indices at distal posterior tibial and anterior tibial/dorsalis pedis arteries with, transcutaneous oxygen tension measurement at 1-2 levels)
93880
Duplex scan of extracranial arteries; complete bilateral study
93970
Duplex scan of extremity veins including responses to compression and other maneuvers; complete bilateral study
93971
Duplex scan of extremity veins including responses to compression and other maneuvers; unilateral or limited study

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1669425906
Geriatric Medicine
1,906
1528011806
Diagnostic Radiology
1,618
1295827657
Diagnostic Radiology
1,368
1891997219
Nephrology
1,270
1376599423
Diagnostic Radiology
1,258
1073557096
Nephrology
1,221
1689725228
Hematology/Oncology
1,175
1588614523
Diagnostic Radiology
1,101
1134166739
Diagnostic Radiology
1,002
1245280510
Diagnostic Radiology
977
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Blair has made to other doctors

Publications

From genotype to phenotype: Are there imaging characteristics associated with lung adenocarcinomas harboring RET and ROS1 rearrangements? - Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
Recurrent gene rearrangements are important drivers of oncogenesis in non-small cell lung cancers. RET and ROS1 rearrangements are each found in 1-2% of lung adenocarcinomas and represent distinct molecular subsets. This study assessed the computed tomography (CT) imaging features of patients with RET- and ROS1-rearranged lung cancers.Eligible patients included pathologically-confirmed lung adenocarcinomas of any stage with a RET or ROS1 rearrangement via fluorescence in-situ hybridization or next-generation sequencing, and available pre-treatment baseline imaging for review. A cohort of EGFR-mutant lung cancers was identified as a control group. CT features assessed included location, consistency, contour, presence of cavitation, and calcification of the primary tumor. Presence of an effusion, lung metastases, adenopathy and extrathoracic disease were recorded. The Wilcoxon rank-sum/Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare features between groups.73 patients with lung adenocarcinomas were identified: 17 (23%) with ROS1 fusions, 25 (34%) with RET fusions and 31 (43%) with EGFR mutations. ROS1-rearranged lung cancers were more likely to present as peripheral tumors in comparison to EGFR-mutant lung cancers (32% vs. 65%, p=0.04). RET-rearranged lung cancers did not significantly differ from EGFR-mutant lung cancers radiographically. The consistency of the primary lesion for RET and ROS fusions and EGFR mutations were most frequently solid and spiculated.Lung adenocarcinomas with RET and ROS1 fusions share many radiographic features and those with ROS1 fusions are more likely to present as peripheral lesions in comparison to EGFR-mutant lung cancers.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Novel Poxvirus Infection in an Immune Suppressed Patient. - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
 Human and animal poxvirus infections are being reported with increasing frequency. We describe a challenging case history and treatment of a previously unknown poxvirus rash illness in a renal transplant patient. A combination of classical microbiology techniques, including viral culture and electron microscopy, were used to provide initial clinical diagnosis. Subsequent standard polymerase chain reaction assays available in 2001 were noncontributory. Next generation sequencing was used to provide definitive diagnosis. Retrospectively, next generation sequencing methods were used to ultimately provide the definitive diagnosis of a novel poxvirus infection initially identified by electron microscopy. The closest relative of this poxvirus, identified in North America, is a poxvirus collected from a mosquito pool from Central Africa in 1972. This diagnostic quandary was ultimately solved using next generation DNA sequencing. This article describes the use of classical and next generation diagnostic strategies to identify etiologic agents of emerging infectious diseases and once again demonstrates the susceptibility of immunossupressed patients to novel pathogens. The virus identified is closely related to Yoka virus; these viruses appear to have independently diverged from a common ancestor of all known orthopoxviruses.Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
The Tale of Infective Endocarditis: Fatal Then Curable but Rarely Preventable. - The American journal of the medical sciences
The story of infective endocarditis (IE) is a miracle of medical progress. In retrospect, it seems as a logical and orderly progression of remarkable events leading to the nearly complete conquest of the disease. IE was almost uniformly fatal until the 1st cures by surgery, followed by frequent cures with antibiotics, further improved when combined with valve surgery. Most recently, it has become almost a new disease with a change in the offending organisms, a change in the type of afflicted patients and the infection of implanted medical devices. Despite therapeutic success, prevention of IE has been elusive. In this review, the authors tell the story by highlighting major events, illustrating interconnections among branches of science that brought the authors to their present state and describing some well-known patients. For this summary, the authors are indebted to the more detailed descriptions of the IE history readily available for interested readers.
Preemptive antiretroviral therapy modifications for the management of potential clinically significant drug interactions with direct acting hepatitis C therapies. - International journal of STD & AIDS
We report a case series of HIV/HCV co-infected patients who underwent preemptive antiretroviral therapy modifications to manage clinically significant drug interactions with HCV therapy. Among the 15 patients reviewed, all changed to a raltegravir-based regimen and none experienced a loss of virologic suppression or increase in HIV-RNA.© The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.
Imaging appearances of diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia. - Clinical imaging
The objective of the study was to describe the imaging appearances of diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) on computed tomography (CT).Electronic medical records were searched for patients with pathology-proven DIPNECH who had a CT available for review. Eleven patients were included.The most common finding on CT was small pulmonary nodules which were present in all patients and were multiple (≥5) in 7/11 patients. Other CT findings included mosaic pattern attenuation and bronchial wall thickening/bronchiectasis.DIPNECH should be considered as a diagnostic possibility when multiple small pulmonary nodules are identified on CT, particularly if there is an associated carcinoid tumor.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
A mouse strain defective in both T cells and NK cells has enhanced sensitivity to tumor induction by plasmid DNA expressing both activated H-Ras and c-Myc. - PloS one
As part of safety studies to evaluate the risk of residual cellular DNA in vaccines manufactured in tumorigenic cells, we have been developing in vivo assays to detect and quantify the oncogenic activity of DNA. We generated a plasmid expressing both an activated human H-ras gene and murine c-myc gene and showed that 1 µg of this plasmid, pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc, was capable of inducing tumors in newborn NIH Swiss mice. However, to be able to detect the oncogenicity of dominant activated oncogenes in cellular DNA, a more sensitive system was needed. In this paper, we demonstrate that the newborn CD3 epsilon transgenic mouse, which is defective in both T-cell and NK-cell functions, can detect the oncogenic activity of 25 ng of the circular form of pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc. When this plasmid was inoculated as linear DNA, amounts of DNA as low as 800 pg were capable of inducing tumors. Animals were found that had multiple tumors, and these tumors were independent and likely clonal. These results demonstrate that the newborn CD3 epsilon mouse is highly sensitive for the detection of oncogenic activity of DNA. To determine whether it can detect the oncogenic activity of cellular DNA derived from four human tumor-cell lines (HeLa, A549, HT-1080, and CEM), DNA (100 µg) was inoculated into newborn CD3 epsilon mice both in the presence of 1 µg of linear pMSV-T24-H-ras/MSV-c-myc as positive control and in its absence. While tumors were induced in 100% of mice with the positive-control plasmid, no tumors were induced in mice receiving any of the tumor DNAs alone. These results demonstrate that detection of oncogenes in cellular DNA derived from four human tumor-derived cell lines in this mouse system was not possible; the results also show the importance of including a positive-control plasmid to detect inhibitory effects of the cellular DNA.
Oncolytic viruses targeting tumor stem cells. - Cancer research
A workshop "Targeting Oncolytic Viruses to Tumor Stem Cells," organized by the Division of Cancer Biology, NCI, NIH, was held on September 6, 2013 in Rockville, MD. Seventeen invited experts presented an overview of their current research in this area and discussed the state of current research on the use of oncolytic viruses targeted to stem cells as a potential cancer therapy. The goal was to evaluate the evidence that this approach might increase the efficacy of oncolytic virus therapy and to identify gaps in knowledge that have retarded progress in this area.©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.
Thigh Abscess Caused by Yersinia enterocolitica in an Immunocompetent Host. - Case reports in medicine
Yersinia enterocolitica is primarily a gastrointestinal tract pathogen known to cause gastroenteritis, although it may produce extra-intestinal infections like sepsis and its sequelae. However, primary cutaneous infections are extremely rare. We present a case of Y. enterocolitica thigh abscess in an immunocompetent adult. The portal of entry is unclear in this case. He did many outdoor activities that involved skin injuries and exposure to soil and contaminated water. Hence, direct inoculation as a result of exposure to contaminated water is postulated in the absence of evidence for a gastrointestinal route of infection.
Actinomyces meyeri infection: case report and review of the literature. - The Journal of infection
Actinomyces meyeri is an uncommon cause of actinomycosis. We present a patient with pneumonia and empyema due to A. meyeri. The patient underwent open thoracotomy with decortication and was discharged home on a twelve-month course of oral penicillin. Review of the English literature revealed thirty-two cases of infection due to A. meyeri. The majority of patients were male, and a significant number had poor dental hygiene and a history of alcoholism. More than other Actinomyces species, A. meyeri causes pulmonary infection and has a predilection for dissemination. Prognosis is favorable with prolonged penicillin therapy combined with surgical debridement, if needed.Copyright © 2012 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
What HIV-positive MSM want from sexual risk reduction interventions: findings from a qualitative study. - AIDS and behavior
To facilitate the development of a tailored intervention that meets the needs of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (HIV-positive MSM), we conducted formative research with 52 HIV-positive MSM. We sought to (a) identify major barriers to consistent condom use, (b) characterize their interest in sexual risk reduction interventions, and (c) elicit feedback regarding optimal intervention format. Men identified several key barriers to consistent condom use, including treatment optimism, lessened support for safer sex in the broader gay community, challenges communicating with partners, and concerns about stigmatization following serostatus disclosure. Many men expressed an interest in health promotion programming, but did not want to participate in an intervention focusing exclusively on safer sex. Instead, they preferred a supportive group intervention that addresses other coping challenges as well as sexual risk reduction. Study results reveal important considerations for the development of appealing and efficacious risk reduction interventions for HIV-positive MSM.

Map & Directions

1301 Punchbowl St Honolulu, HI 96813
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