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Dr. Ann  Celi  Md Mph image

Dr. Ann Celi Md Mph

75 Francis St Phyllis Jen Center For Primary Care
Boston MA 02115
617 326-6040
Medical School: Harvard Medical School - 1995
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: 160234
NPI: 1467488916
Taxonomy Codes:
207R00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Ann Celi is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$349.01 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$111.79
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$247.62 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$79.49

HCPCS Code Definitions

99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1265478952
Internal Medicine
124
1437149184
Internal Medicine
122
1376630830
Internal Medicine
74
1154374346
Internal Medicine
58
1710962568
Diagnostic Radiology
47
1093797235
Diagnostic Radiology
33
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Celi has made to other doctors

Publications

Recognition by Women's Health Care Providers of Long-Term Cardiovascular Disease Risk After Preeclampsia. - Obstetrics and gynecology
To assess health care providers' knowledge regarding pregnancy outcome as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and evaluate the variables associated with their responses to questions about routine surveillance for cardiovascular disease.A voluntary, anonymous survey of internal medicine and obstetric and gynecologic health care providers at an academic institution. Responses to a case-based and direct inquiry questionnaire were evaluated.The overall response rate was 65% (173/265). When assessing cardiovascular risk, gynecologists compared with internists significantly more often requested a pregnancy history (44/49 [90%] compared with 56/75 [75%], P=.039) and more often attached importance to a history of preeclampsia (35/48 [73%] compared with 41/75 [55%], P=.028). When a history of preeclampsia was obtained, internists more often obtained a fasting glucose test (25/52 [48%] compared with 9/43 [20.9%], P=.009). A minority of health care providers recognized the importance of fetal growth restriction. Both health care provider groups demonstrated similar knowledge of general cardiovascular risk factors, screening tools, and interventions. Higher general cardiovascular knowledge was significantly associated with identification of pregnancy complications as cardiovascular risk factors (P=.001).When assessing cardiovascular risk, internists were less likely than gynecologists to include a pregnancy history. However, once identified as at risk for cardiovascular disease, gynecologists were less likely than internists to obtain appropriate testing. Education concerning the link between certain pregnancy complications and future cardiovascular disease is needed. Areas of opportunity for education in both medical specialties are identified.
Acute histologic chorioamnionitis at term: nearly always noninfectious. - PloS one
The link between histologic acute chorioamnionitis and infection is well established in preterm deliveries, but less well-studied in term pregnancies, where infection is much less common.We conducted a secondary analysis among 195 low-risk women with term pregnancies enrolled in a randomized trial. Histologic and microbiologic evaluation of placentas included anaerobic and aerobic cultures (including mycoplasma/ureaplasma species) as well as PCR. Infection was defined as ≥1,000 cfu of a single known pathogen or a ≥2 log difference in counts for a known pathogen versus other organisms in a mixed culture. Placental membranes were scored and categorized as: no chorioamnionitis, Grade 1 (subchorionitis and patchy acute chorioamnionitis), or Grade 2 (severe, confluent chorioamnionitis). Grade 1 or grade 2 histologic chorioamnionitis was present in 34% of placentas (67/195), but infection was present in only 4% (8/195). Histologic chorioamnionitis was strongly associated with intrapartum fever >38°C [69% (25/36) fever, 26% (42/159) afebrile, P<.0001]. Fever occurred in 18% (n = 36) of women. Most febrile women [92% (33/36)] had received epidural for pain relief, though the association with fever was present with and without epidural. The association remained significant in a logistic regression controlling for potential confounders (OR = 5.8, 95% CI = 2.2,15.0). Histologic chorioamnionitis was also associated with elevated serum levels of interleukin-8 (median = 1.3 pg/mL no histologic chorioamnionitis, 1.5 pg/mL Grade 1, 2.1 pg/mL Grade 2, P = 0.05) and interleukin-6 (median levels = 2.2 pg/mL no chorioamnionitis, 5.3 pg/mL Grade 1, 24.5 pg/mL Grade 2, P = 0.02) at admission for delivery as well as higher admission WBC counts (mean = 12,000 cells/mm(3) no chorioamnionitis, 13,400 cells/mm(3) Grade 1, 15,700 cells/mm(3) Grade 2, P = 0.0005).Our results suggest histologic chorioamnionitis at term most often results from a noninfectious inflammatory process. It was strongly associated with fever, most of which was related to epidural used for pain relief. A more 'activated' maternal immune system at admission was also associated with histologic chorioamnionitis.
Association of epidural-related fever and noninfectious inflammation in term labor. - Obstetrics and gynecology
To investigate the role of infection and noninfectious inflammation in epidural analgesia-related fever.This was an observational analysis of placental cultures and serum admission and postpartum cytokine levels obtained from 200 women at low risk recruited during the prenatal period.Women receiving labor epidural analgesia had fever develop more frequently (22.7% compared with 6% no epidural; P=.009) but were not more likely to have placental infection (4.7% epidural, 4.0% no epidural; P>.99). Infection was similar regardless of maternal fever (5.4% febrile, 4.3% afebrile; P=.7). Median admission interleukin (IL)-6 levels did not differ according to later epidural (3.2 pg/mL compared with 1.6 pg/mL no epidural; P=.2), but admission IL-6 levels greater than 11 pg/mL were associated with an increase in fever among epidural users (36.4% compared with 15.7% for 11 pg/mL or less; P=.008). At delivery, both febrile and afebrile women receiving epidural had higher IL-6 levels than women not receiving analgesia.Epidural-related fever is rarely attributable to infection but is associated with an inflammatory state.
Immigration, race/ethnicity, and social and economic factors as predictors of breastfeeding initiation. - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine
To determine the impact of immigration status as well as race/ethnicity and social and economic factors on breastfeeding initiation.Cohort.Multisite group practice in eastern Massachusetts.One thousand eight hundred twenty-nine pregnant women prospectively followed up in Project Viva.Whether the participant breastfed her infant.The overall breastfeeding initiation rate was 83%. In multivariate models that included race/ethnicity and social, economic, and demographic factors, foreign-born women were more likely to initiate breastfeeding than US-born women (odds ratio [OR], 3.2 [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.0-5.2]). In models stratified by both race/ethnicity and immigration status, and further adjusted for whether the mother herself was breastfed as an infant and the mother's parents' immigration status, US-born and foreign-born black and Hispanic women initiated breastfeeding at rates at least as high as US-born white women (US-born black vs US-born white women, OR, 1.2 [95% CI, 0.8-1.9], US-born Hispanic vs US-born white women, OR, 1.1 [95% CI, 0.6-1.9], foreign-born black vs US-born white women, OR, 2.6 [95% CI, 1.1-6.0], and foreign-born Hispanic vs US-born white women, OR, 1.8 [95% CI, 0.7-4.8]). Calculations of predicted prevalences showed that, for example, the 2.6-fold increase in odds for the foreign-born black vs US-born white women translated to an increase in probability of approximately 1.4. Higher maternal education and household income also predicted higher initiation rates.Immigration status was strongly associated with increased breastfeeding initiation in this cohort, implying that cultural factors are important in the decision to breastfeed. Immigrants of all races/ethnicities initiated breastfeeding more often than their US-born counterparts. In addition, US-born minority groups initiated breastfeeding at rates at least as high as their white counterparts, likely due in part to high levels of education and income as well as to access to a medical care system that explicitly supports breastfeeding.

Map & Directions

75 Francis St Phyllis Jen Center For Primary Care Boston, MA 02115
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