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Dr. Hanspaul  Makkar  Md image

Dr. Hanspaul Makkar Md

21 South Rd Uconn Medical Group/Dermatology Associates
Farmington CT 06032
860 794-4600
Medical School: Other - 2000
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 044189
NPI: 1467488510
Taxonomy Codes:
207N00000X 207ND0101X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Hanspaul Makkar is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:14061 Description:Skin tissue rearrangement Average Price:$2,025.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$790.39
HCPCS Code:14301 Description:Skin tissue rearrangement Average Price:$1,970.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$978.20
HCPCS Code:17311 Description:Mohs 1 stage h/n/hf/g Average Price:$1,182.56 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$220.00
HCPCS Code:14041 Description:Skin tissue rearrangement Average Price:$1,658.46 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$800.31
HCPCS Code:15260 Description:Skin full graft een & lips Average Price:$1,736.87 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$941.80
HCPCS Code:15240 Description:Skin full grft face/genit/hf Average Price:$1,540.77 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$776.90
HCPCS Code:14021 Description:Skin tissue rearrangement Average Price:$1,513.85 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$789.04
HCPCS Code:14060 Description:Skin tissue rearrangement Average Price:$1,405.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$727.89
HCPCS Code:14040 Description:Skin tissue rearrangement Average Price:$1,340.86 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$690.01
HCPCS Code:14020 Description:Skin tissue rearrangement Average Price:$1,226.25 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$619.93
HCPCS Code:13152 Description:Repair of wound or lesion Average Price:$1,035.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$458.05
HCPCS Code:13151 Description:Repair of wound or lesion Average Price:$699.67 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$183.11
HCPCS Code:13132 Description:Repair of wound or lesion Average Price:$1,010.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$505.03
HCPCS Code:17312 Description:Mohs addl stage Average Price:$710.35 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$217.81
HCPCS Code:11606 Description:Exc tr-ext mal+marg > 4 cm Average Price:$760.33 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$296.01
HCPCS Code:13131 Description:Repair of wound or lesion Average Price:$608.33 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$159.18
HCPCS Code:13121 Description:Repair of wound or lesion Average Price:$765.45 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$322.96
HCPCS Code:11622 Description:Exc s/n/h/f/g mal+mrg 1.1-2 Average Price:$470.43 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$93.04
HCPCS Code:11603 Description:Exc tr-ext mal+marg 2.1-3 cm Average Price:$478.49 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$105.01
HCPCS Code:11642 Description:Exc f/e/e/n/l mal+mrg 1.1-2 Average Price:$485.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$127.71
HCPCS Code:12052 Description:Intmd wnd repair face/mm Average Price:$539.38 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$195.87
HCPCS Code:11602 Description:Exc tr-ext mal+marg 1.1-2 cm Average Price:$431.37 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$89.24
HCPCS Code:11604 Description:Exc tr-ext mal+marg 3.1-4 cm Average Price:$530.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$192.78
HCPCS Code:11643 Description:Exc f/e/e/n/l mal+mrg 2.1-3 Average Price:$570.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$233.65
HCPCS Code:12032 Description:Intmd wnd repair s/a/t/ext Average Price:$528.55 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$197.38
HCPCS Code:12042 Description:Intmd wnd repair n-hf/genit Average Price:$508.26 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$178.84
HCPCS Code:11402 Description:Exc tr-ext b9+marg 1.1-2 cm Average Price:$282.17 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$61.49
HCPCS Code:17262 Description:Destruction of skin lesions Average Price:$298.87 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$83.69
HCPCS Code:11100 Description:Biopsy skin lesion Average Price:$186.21 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$45.09
HCPCS Code:69100 Description:Biopsy of external ear Average Price:$188.57 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$49.46
HCPCS Code:17000 Description:Destruct premalg lesion Average Price:$145.37 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$51.78
HCPCS Code:99202 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$137.81 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$51.98
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$133.46 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$52.62
HCPCS Code:99212 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$79.30 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$26.72
HCPCS Code:11101 Description:Biopsy skin add-on Average Price:$60.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$26.59

HCPCS Code Definitions

11642
Excision, malignant lesion including margins, face, ears, eyelids, nose, lips; excised diameter 1.1 to 2.0 cm
11101
Biopsy of skin, subcutaneous tissue and/or mucous membrane (including simple closure), unless otherwise listed; each separate/additional lesion (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
11402
Excision, benign lesion including margins, except skin tag (unless listed elsewhere), trunk, arms or legs; excised diameter 1.1 to 2.0 cm
11100
Biopsy of skin, subcutaneous tissue and/or mucous membrane (including simple closure), unless otherwise listed; single lesion
12042
Repair, intermediate, wounds of neck, hands, feet and/or external genitalia; 2.6 cm to 7.5 cm
11622
Excision, malignant lesion including margins, scalp, neck, hands, feet, genitalia; excised diameter 1.1 to 2.0 cm
11602
Excision, malignant lesion including margins, trunk, arms, or legs; excised diameter 1.1 to 2.0 cm
11604
Excision, malignant lesion including margins, trunk, arms, or legs; excised diameter 3.1 to 4.0 cm
11603
Excision, malignant lesion including margins, trunk, arms, or legs; excised diameter 2.1 to 3.0 cm
11606
Excision, malignant lesion including margins, trunk, arms, or legs; excised diameter over 4.0 cm
12032
Repair, intermediate, wounds of scalp, axillae, trunk and/or extremities (excluding hands and feet); 2.6 cm to 7.5 cm
11643
Excision, malignant lesion including margins, face, ears, eyelids, nose, lips; excised diameter 2.1 to 3.0 cm
13131
Repair, complex, forehead, cheeks, chin, mouth, neck, axillae, genitalia, hands and/or feet; 1.1 cm to 2.5 cm
12052
Repair, intermediate, wounds of face, ears, eyelids, nose, lips and/or mucous membranes; 2.6 cm to 5.0 cm
13121
Repair, complex, scalp, arms, and/or legs; 2.6 cm to 7.5 cm
15260
Full thickness graft, free, including direct closure of donor site, nose, ears, eyelids, and/or lips; 20 sq cm or less
13151
Repair, complex, eyelids, nose, ears and/or lips; 1.1 cm to 2.5 cm
13132
Repair, complex, forehead, cheeks, chin, mouth, neck, axillae, genitalia, hands and/or feet; 2.6 cm to 7.5 cm
13152
Repair, complex, eyelids, nose, ears and/or lips; 2.6 cm to 7.5 cm
14020
Adjacent tissue transfer or rearrangement, scalp, arms and/or legs; defect 10 sq cm or less
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
14021
Adjacent tissue transfer or rearrangement, scalp, arms and/or legs; defect 10.1 sq cm to 30.0 sq cm
14040
Adjacent tissue transfer or rearrangement, forehead, cheeks, chin, mouth, neck, axillae, genitalia, hands and/or feet; defect 10 sq cm or less
14041
Adjacent tissue transfer or rearrangement, forehead, cheeks, chin, mouth, neck, axillae, genitalia, hands and/or feet; defect 10.1 sq cm to 30.0 sq cm
15240
Full thickness graft, free, including direct closure of donor site, forehead, cheeks, chin, mouth, neck, axillae, genitalia, hands, and/or feet; 20 sq cm or less
14060
Adjacent tissue transfer or rearrangement, eyelids, nose, ears and/or lips; defect 10 sq cm or less
14301
Adjacent tissue transfer or rearrangement, any area; defect 30.1 sq cm to 60.0 sq cm
14061
Adjacent tissue transfer or rearrangement, eyelids, nose, ears and/or lips; defect 10.1 sq cm to 30.0 sq cm
69100
Biopsy external ear
99212
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused history; A problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are self limited or minor. Typically, 10 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
17312
Mohs micrographic technique, including removal of all gross tumor, surgical excision of tissue specimens, mapping, color coding of specimens, microscopic examination of specimens by the surgeon, and histopathologic preparation including routine stain(s) (eg, hematoxylin and eosin, toluidine blue), head, neck, hands, feet, genitalia, or any location with surgery directly involving muscle, cartilage, bone, tendon, major nerves, or vessels; each additional stage after the first stage, up to 5 tissue blocks (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
17262
Destruction, malignant lesion (eg, laser surgery, electrosurgery, cryosurgery, chemosurgery, surgical curettement), trunk, arms or legs; lesion diameter 1.1 to 2.0 cm
17000
Destruction (eg, laser surgery, electrosurgery, cryosurgery, chemosurgery, surgical curettement), premalignant lesions (eg, actinic keratoses); first lesion
17311
Mohs micrographic technique, including removal of all gross tumor, surgical excision of tissue specimens, mapping, color coding of specimens, microscopic examination of specimens by the surgeon, and histopathologic preparation including routine stain(s) (eg, hematoxylin and eosin, toluidine blue), head, neck, hands, feet, genitalia, or any location with surgery directly involving muscle, cartilage, bone, tendon, major nerves, or vessels; first stage, up to 5 tissue blocks
99202
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 20 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1629003918
Dermatology
441
1154323426
Geriatric Medicine
383
1699726125
Surgical Oncology
337
1528090727
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
319
1720080476
Dermatology
306
1699821892
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
299
1447245030
Diagnostic Radiology
245
1023015898
Endocrinology
243
1235190562
Internal Medicine
221
1861491839
Internal Medicine
211
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Makkar has made to other doctors

Publications

Nodular cystic fat necrosis with calcification in a patient with juvenile dermatomyositis. - Pediatric dermatology
Nodular cystic fat necrosis is a rare, benign form of encapsulated fat necrosis with distinct histology, characterized by cystic fat necrosis with lipomembranous changes and, in later stages, calcification. We report the case of a 7-year-old child with juvenile dermatomyositis who presented with three asymptomatic, firm, mobile nodules on the arms and neck. Histology was consistent with nodular cystic fat necrosis with prominent calcification. This is an unusual presentation of this entity because it has never been previously reported in association with juvenile dermatomyositis.© 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Ethics in pediatric dermatology. - Clinics in dermatology
The patient-parent-physician relationship is central to studying medical ethics in pediatric dermatology. The rights of children in medical decision making are ambiguous, and parents and physicians will often override the autonomy of a child when a particular treatment is deemed to be in the child's best interest. The use of physical restraint to enforce a treatment should be justified, and a reasonable attempt should be made to ensure the cooperation of the child, if possible. Medical photography is central to the practice of pediatric dermatology in that it allows for serial observation of cutaneous lesions over time. Established guidelines and standards should be followed. Pediatric dermatologists frequently prescribe medications off-label; if following established professional standards, and prescribing with good intention, off-label prescribing can be appropriate and rational.Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Molecular diagnosis of a benign proliferative nodule developing in a congenital melanocytic nevus in a 3-month-old infant. - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Small and intermediate congenital melanocytic nevi have a lifetime risk of developing melanoma estimated to range from 0% to 5%. Secondary benign melanocytic proliferations commonly arise in congenital melanocytic nevi; however, some are difficult to definitively distinguish from malignant melanoma based on clinical features and conventional histology. Herein, we describe the use of comparative genomic hybridization in supporting the diagnosis of a deep penetrating nevus developing within a congenital melanocytic nevus of a 3-month-old infant.
Pediatric surgical pearls: minimizing complications. - Seminars in cutaneous medicine and surgery
Performing dermatologic surgery in infants and children presents unique challenges. A thorough understanding of both pediatric developmental milestones and their unique surgical circumstances is essential to providing optimal dermatologic care of the pediatric patient. In this work, we combine the authors' experiences with data from the literature to provide pediatric dermatologic procedural pearls.
Neurocutaneous melanosis. - Seminars in cutaneous medicine and surgery
Neurocutaneous melanosis (NCM) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by the presence of large or multiple congenital melanocytic nevi in association with benign or malignant proliferation of melanocytes in the leptomeninges. NCM is believed to occur as a consequence of an error in morphogenesis in neural ectoderm in the developing embryo. Animal models suggest that aberrant expression of the hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) may be involved in the pathogenesis in the NCM. While the majority of patients with NCM have large congenital melanocytic nevi in a posterior axial distribution, a significant proportion of patients present with multiple smaller nevi in the absence of a single larger lesion. Neurologic manifestations generally occur within the first two years of life, and are often related to increased intracranial pressure. Associated structural anomalies of the CNS have been reported in NCM, particularly the Dandy-Walker complex. The long-term clinical significance of characteristic magnetic resonance findings in neurologically asymptomatic patients is unclear. Approximately half of NCM patients develop CNS melanoma. The prognosis of symptomatic patients remains poor.
Congenital melanocytic nevi: an update for the pediatrician. - Current opinion in pediatrics
While melanoma is uncommon in childhood, recent evidence suggests that its incidence is increasing in both adolescence and adulthood. Risk factors may be identifiable during childhood and include congenital nevi. Large congenital nevi carry a significantly increased risk for the development of melanoma, both cutaneous and extracutaneous. This risk appears to be greatest during early childhood. Large congenital nevi, particularly those overlying the head and neck, may also be associated with neurocutaneous melanosis. Symptomatic neurocutaneous melanosis, although rare, carries a poor prognosis. Conversely, asymptomatic neurocutaneous melanosis may be more common than previously recognized. For the most part, large congenital nevi are treated with primary excisions and closures, assisted by tissue-expansion techniques and skin grafting. Until the associated risks are better defined, therapy of small congenital nevi should be individualized, with consideration given to additional melanoma risk factors.
microRNA in situ hybridization for miR-211 detection as an ancillary test in melanoma diagnosis. - Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc
Some melanocytic tumors can be histologically ambiguous causing diagnostic difficulty, which could lead to overtreatment of benign lesions with an unwarranted psychological distress or undertreatment of malignant cancers. Previously, we demonstrated that significantly decreased miR-211 expression in melanomas compared with melanocytic nevi could accurately discriminate malignant from benign tumors. Herein we show microRNA in situ hybridization for fluorescent detection of miR-211, suitable for paraffin-embedded tissues in 109 primary melanocytic tumors. miR-211 expression was significantly lower in melanomas vs nevi (P<0.0001), and receiver operating characteristic curve (area under the curve=0.862) accurately discriminated melanomas from nevi with 90% sensitivity and 86.2% specificity. Qualitatively, all dysplastic nevi expressed miR-211 at high (86%) and low (14%) levels, independent of the degree of nuclear atypia. All 35 melanocytic tumors with Spitz morphology expressed miR-211 independent of morphological classification, where clinical follow-up of these patients showed no recurrence at the site or metastasis in mean and median of 3 (ranging 2-5) years. Moreover, a decision tree learning analysis selected age and miR-211 miRNA in situ hybridization as the predictive variables for benign or malignant outcome in 88 patients correctly classified 92% (81 out of 88) of cases as proven by receiver operating characteristic curve (area under the curve=0.9029). These results support miR-211 as a leading miRNA candidate for melanoma diagnosis and miRNA in situ hybridization as a uniquely uncomplicated ancillary test.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 26 February 2016; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2016.44.
Laser therapy in dermatology: Kids are not just little people. - Clinics in dermatology
Advances in laser research and technology have led to expanded laser applications for the treatment of dermatologic disease. Lasers are viable treatment modalities for patients of any age group and offer unique treatment options for both adult and pediatric patients. While many skin diseases can be treated similarly in children and adults, differences in treatment approaches can result from varying anxiety levels, pain tolerance, psychosocial considerations of untreated disease, determination of suitable anesthesia, the use of size-appropriate safety equipment, and differences in the evolution of skin disease over time. Laser therapy can prove effective for the treatment of molluscum contagiosum unresponsive to conventional therapy. Hypertrophied vascular lesions and pigmented lesions, such as the nevus of Ota, respond more effectively to laser therapy earlier in life with fewer treatment sessions and reduced side effects. In the case of port-wine stains, the pulsed dye laser is the agent of choice in the pediatric patient, while the Q-switched alexandrite may be more effective in the adult population.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Map & Directions

21 South Rd Uconn Medical Group/Dermatology Associates Farmington, CT 06032
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