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Dr. Asim  Ahmad  Md image

Dr. Asim Ahmad Md

4500 San Pablo Rd S Provider Enrollment
Jacksonville FL 32224
904 532-2000
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: TRN16002
NPI: 1447544838
Taxonomy Codes:
207R00000X

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Publications

WITHDRAWN: Porous Metal Augments Show Excellent Mid-to-Long Term Survival in Complex Acetabular Reconstruction. - The Journal of arthroplasty
This article has been withdrawn at the request of the author(s) and/or editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy.Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Vibrio parahaemolyticus Induced Necrotizing Fasciitis: An Atypical Organism Causing an Unusual Presentation. - Case reports in infectious diseases
Background necrotizing fasciitis (NF) represents a life-threatening bacterial infection characterized by a rapid necrosis of deep subcutaneous tissue and facia underlying the skin. Despite its lethal nature, NF occurs infrequently, leaving many physicians unfamiliar with the disease process, common pathogens, and treatment strategies. Here we present a case of NF caused by an unlikely organism, Vibrio parahaemolyticus. We highlight the innocuous nature of initial presentation and the potentially devastating sequela.
Chiral heterobimetallic complexes targeting human DNA-topoisomerase Iα. - Dalton transactions (Cambridge, England : 2003)
The chiral monometallic Cu(II) (1) and Zn(II) (2) and heterobimetallic Cu(II)-Sn(IV) and Zn(II)-Sn(IV) complexes with tridentate chiral Schiff base -ONO-ligand in the presence of nitrogen donor heterocyclic ligand imidazole; were prepared and characterized by various physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. Preliminary complex-DNA interaction studies employing optical methods revealed that 3 displayed a higher propensity towards the drug target DNA double helix and recommended predominantly an electrostatic mode of interaction as well as a groove binding affinity of the complex with CT-DNA. This was quantified by Kb and KSV values of complexes 1-4, which demonstrated a multifold increase in complex 3 binding to CT DNA and clearly demonstrates its potency to act as a chemotherapeutic agent. Furthermore, the gel electrophoretic patterns of supercoiled pBR322 DNA with varying concentrations of complex 3 exhibits the ability to cleave DNA and follow a freely diffusible radical mechanism. The antiproliferative effects of complex 3 on human hepatoma cancer cells (Huh7) was investigated. Human Topo I inhibition assay by complex 3 was performed and results confirmed significantly good activity at lower concentrations than some of the classical Topo I inhibitors. Additionally, complex 3 was investigated for the expression of MMP-2 and TGF-β by real time PCR. The cellular uptake of complex 3 by HeLa cells was studied by confocal microscopy.
Synthesis and characterization of copper(II) and zinc(II)-based potential chemotherapeutic compounds: their biological evaluation viz. DNA binding profile, cleavage and antimicrobial activity. - European journal of medicinal chemistry
Metal-based cancer chemotherapeutic agents of the type [Cu(phen)TzCl(2)]H(2)O 1 and [Zn(phen)(Tz)Cl(2)·H(2)O] 2, where phen = 1,10-phenanthroline and Tz = 1,2,4-triazole have been synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The structure of complex 1 was also determined by X-ray crystallography. The in vitro DNA binding studies of complexes 1 and 2 with CT DNA were carried out by various biophysical and molecular docking techniques. Both the complexes cleave supercoiled pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic pathway, as validated by T4 DNA ligase assay. Furthermore, both complexes exhibited significant antimicrobial activity. The results revealed that complex 1 has better prospectus to act as cancer chemotherapeutic candidate which warrants further in vitro and in vivo anticancer investigations.Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.
Ethanol enhances carbachol-induced protease activation and accelerates Ca2+ waves in isolated rat pancreatic acini. - The Journal of biological chemistry
Alcohol abuse is a leading cause of pancreatitis, accounting for 30% of acute cases and 70-90% of chronic cases, yet the mechanisms leading to alcohol-associated pancreatic injury are unclear. An early and critical feature of pancreatitis is the aberrant signaling of Ca(2+) within the pancreatic acinar cell. An important conductor of this Ca(2+) is the basolaterally localized, intracellular Ca(2+) channel ryanodine receptor (RYR). In this study, we examined the effect of ethanol on mediating both pathologic intra-acinar protease activation, a precursor to pancreatitis, as well as RYR Ca(2+) signals. We hypothesized that ethanol sensitizes the acinar cell to protease activation by modulating RYR Ca(2+). Acinar cells were freshly isolated from rat, pretreated with ethanol, and stimulated with the muscarinic agonist carbachol (1 μM). Ethanol caused a doubling in the carbachol-induced activation of the proteases trypsin and chymotrypsin (p < 0.02). The RYR inhibitor dantrolene abrogated the enhancement of trypsin and chymotrypsin activity by ethanol (p < 0.005 for both proteases). Further, ethanol accelerated the speed of the apical to basolateral Ca(2+) wave from 9 to 18 μm/s (p < 0.0005; n = 18-22 cells/group); an increase in Ca(2+) wave speed was also observed with a change from physiologic concentrations of carbachol (1 μM) to a supraphysiologic concentration (1 mM) that leads to protease activation. Dantrolene abrogated the ethanol-induced acceleration of wave speed (p < 0.05; n = 10-16 cells/group). Our results suggest that the enhancement of pathologic protease activation by ethanol is dependent on the RYR and that a novel mechanism for this enhancement may involve RYR-mediated acceleration of Ca(2+) waves.

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4500 San Pablo Rd S Provider Enrollment Jacksonville, FL 32224
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