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Dr. Eduardo  Alfonso  Md image

Dr. Eduardo Alfonso Md

900 Nw 17Th Ave
Miami FL 33101
305 266-6031
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: ME38565
NPI: 1417990631
Taxonomy Codes:
207W00000X

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Publications

Role of steroids in the treatment of bacterial keratitis. - Clinical ophthalmology (Auckland, N.Z.)
Bacterial keratitis can lead to severe visual impairment from corneal ulceration, subsequent scarring, and possible perforation. The mainstay of treatment is topical antibiotics, whereas the use of adjunctive topical corticosteroid drops remains a matter of debate. Herein, we review the rationale for and against the use of topical corticosteroids and we assess their effectiveness and safety in the published randomized controlled trials that have evaluated their role as adjunctive therapy for bacterial corneal ulcers. In the largest study to date, the Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial, topical corticosteroid drops were neither helpful nor harmful for the 500 participants as a whole. However, subgroup analyses suggested that topical corticosteroids may be beneficial upon early administration (within 2-3 days after starting antibiotics) for more central corneal ulcers with poorer vision at presentation, for invasive Pseudomonas strains, and for non-Nocardia ulcers. These results are discussed within the limitations of the study.
EPITHELIAL DOWNGROWTH IN THE VITREOUS CAVITY AND ON THE RETINA IN ENUCLEATED SPECIMENS AND IN EYES WITH VISUAL POTENTIAL. - Retina (Philadelphia, Pa.)
To report clinical course and visual and anatomical outcomes of six eyes with histopathologically confirmed vitreous cavity and retina epithelial downgrowth.This is a retrospective 15-year review of archived pathologic slides and corresponding medical records of patients with vitreous cavity and retina epithelial downgrowth. Posterior segment epithelial downgrowth was defined as epithelial or goblet cells in the vitreous cavity or on the surface of the retina.Histopathologic diagnosis of epithelial downgrowth was made in 122 patients. Of those, 6 patients (5%) had vitreous cavity and retina epithelial downgrowth. Three patients developed blind painful eye, and epithelial downgrowth was identified in enucleated specimens. The other three eyes with visual potential presented with tractional retinal detachments. Epithelial downgrowth was identified in epiretinal membranes obtained during pars plana vitrectomy. The latter group had more previous surgeries (P = 0.03), and all had keratoprosthesis implantation as their last surgery. All three had pathologic specimens obtained at the time of the keratoprosthesis implantation; no anterior segment epithelial downgrowth was noted in two patients, and one patient had involvement of corneal button, iris, and posterior capsule. Final visual acuity ranged from hand motion to light perception.In the current study, vitreous cavity and retina epithelial downgrowth occurred after multiple intraocular surgeries, including repair of the open globe injuries both in enucleated specimens and in eyes with visual potential. In eyes with visual potential, keratoprosthesis implantation seems to predispose the development of posterior segment epithelial downgrowth.
Contact-Lens-Associated Purpureocillium Keratitis: Risk Factors, Microbiologic Characteristics, Clinical Course, and Outcomes. - Seminars in ophthalmology
To study the risk factors, microbiologic characteristics, clinical course, and outcomes of patients with Purpureocillium keratitis at a tertiary eye care center in south Florida.All medical records during a seven-year period starting January 1, 2007, were reviewed. Twenty-eight culture-proven Purpureocillium keratitis cases with complete medical records presenting to our institution were included in this retrospective, observational case series. Data collected included predisposing factors, therapeutic interventions, treatment duration, and visual outcomes.Twenty patients (71.4%) had a history of soft contact lens use, with only two for therapeutic use. Other identified risk factors were trauma and immunosuppression. Fifteen patients (53.6%) received topical corticosteroid treatment prior to the diagnosis of fungal keratitis. Thirteen patients (46.4%) were on Natamycin treatment prior to Purpureocillium identification. As a group, the average best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at presentation was 1.1 logMAR; upon the final evaluation, it was 1.0 logMAR. The BCVA on last evaluation for the eight patients presenting to our institution within two weeks of onset of symptoms was 0.3 log MAR, and all patients in this group responded to medical management. The final BCVA for 20 patients presenting two weeks after onset of symptoms was 1.2 logMAR. There was a significant difference in the final BCVA between Group 1 and Group 2 (p = 0.004), but no difference in steroid use or previous treatments. Previous steroid use tended to extend time to presentation and was significantly associated with a worse final visual outcome (1.2 versus 0.6 logMAR; p = 0.0474). Previous Natamycin use was significantly associated with a worse final visual outcome (1.4 versus 0.6 logMAR; p = 0.014).Purpureocillium keratitis can have devastating consequences to visual function and even lead to enucleation. Physicians should make every effort to arrive at an earlier microbiological diagnosis, as this is associated with better outcomes and less need for surgical intervention. The first line use of voriconazole is recommended, and steroid use should be avoided, as their previous use is associated with worse visual outcomes.
Unusually delayed presentation of persistent Descemet's membrane tear and detachment after cataract surgery. - Clinical ophthalmology (Auckland, N.Z.)
A 51-year-old male who had undergone phacoemulsification in his left eye 11 months prior presented with complaint of sudden onset of blurred vision in the same eye. Review of his clinical course, slit-lamp exam, pachymetry, and specular endothelial microscopy led to the diagnosis of acute hydrops caused by Descemet's membrane dehiscence at the site of the incision. He was initially managed with medical treatment and observation. In the subsequent months of follow-up, the corneal edema and the patient's visual acuity did not improve. Intracameral gas injection was performed 7 months after presentation, but because of persistent corneal edema and nonattached Descemet's membrane, penetrating keratoplasty was performed. Histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis. The patient has had a clear corneal graft since then. Although Descemet's membrane detachment is a rather common complication after intraocular surgery, its unusually delayed presentation can also occur, and should not be confused with pseudophakic bullous keratopathy. Many mechanisms have been studied for the development of early tears and detachments after cataract surgery, but little is known about late presentations. The authors explore possible causes, and highlight the importance of instructing patients to avoid eye rubbing and any other type of trauma to the cornea after intraocular surgery.
Cysticidal activity of antifungals against different genotypes of Acanthamoeba. - Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
Antifungal drugs have been proposed as a novel treatment for Acanthamoeba keratitis. The cysticidal activity of several antifungal compounds was tested against different genotypes of culture collection and clinical isolates of Acanthamoeba. Only voriconazole and posaconazole were found to be cysticidal, with no differences in activity observed between clinical and culture collection isolates.Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Role of the Vision Van, a mobile ophthalmic outpatient clinic, in the Great East Japan Earthquake. - Clinical ophthalmology (Auckland, N.Z.)
The Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011 triggered powerful tsunami waves off the northeastern Pacific coast of Japan that destroyed almost all of the built-up areas along the coast. The study reported here examined the role played by the Vision Van, a mobile outpatient ophthalmological clinic, in providing eye care to disaster evacuees.This was a retrospective case-series study of 2,070 victims (male: 732, female: 1,338) who visited the Vision Van. The subjects' medical records were examined retrospectively and analyzed in terms of age, sex, and date of visit to the Vision Van. Information regarding each patient's chief complaint, diagnosis, medication(s) prescribed, and eyeglasses and contact lenses provided, was also examined.The Vision Van was used to conduct medical examinations on 39 days between April 23 and June 29, 2011. The average number of subjects visiting the Vision Van each day was 53±31 (range: 7-135), with examinations carried out in Miyagi Prefecture and Iwate Prefecture. The most frequent complaint was a need for eye drops (871/2,070 [42.1%]). The second and third most frequent complaints, respectively, were the need for contact lenses (294/2,070 [14.2%]) and eyeglasses (280/2,070 [13.5%]). The most frequent ocular disease diagnosis was cataract (497/2,070 [24.0%]). Eye drops were prescribed to 74.1% of the subjects.Mobile clinics such as the Vision Van provide valuable care, in this case, particularly to individuals who lost or left behind eyeglasses or contact lenses while escaping a natural disaster, and to subjects with chronic eye disease.
Mutation K42E in dehydrodolichol diphosphate synthase (DHDDS) causes recessive retinitis pigmentosa. - Advances in experimental medicine and biology
A single-nucleotide mutation in the gene that encodes DHDDS has been identified by whole exome sequencing as the cause of the non-syndromic recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in a family of Ashkenazi Jewish origin in which three of the four siblings have early onset retinal degeneration. The peripheral retinal degeneration in the affected siblings was evident in the initial examination in 1992 and only one had detectable electroretinogram (ERG) that suggested cone-rod dysfunction. The pigmentary retinal degeneration subsequently progressed rapidly. The identified mutation changes the highly conserved residue Lys42 to Glu, resulting in lower catalytic efficiency. Patterns of plasma transferrin isoelectric focusing gel were normal in all family members, indicating no significant abnormality in protein glycosylation. Dolichols have been shown to influence the fluidity and of the membrane and promote vesicle fusion. Considering that photoreceptor outer segments contain stacks of membrane discs, we believe that the mutation may lead to low dolichol levels in photoreceptor outer segments, resulting in unstable membrane structure that leads to photoreceptor degeneration.
A novel rat contact lens model for Fusarium keratitis. - Molecular vision
The aim of this study was to develop and characterize a new contact lens-associated fungal keratitis rat model and to assess the ability of non-invasive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to detect pathological changes in vivo in fungal keratitis.We used SD-OCT to image and measure the cornea of Sprague Dawley rats. Fusarium infection was initiated in the rat eye by fitting Fusarium solani-soaked contact lenses on the experimental eye, while the control animals received contact lenses soaked in sterile saline. The fungal infection was monitored with periodic slit-lamp examination and in vivo SD-OCT imaging of the rat eye, and confirmed by histology, counting of viable fungi in the infected rat cornea, and PCR with specific primers for Fusarium sp.We imaged and measured the rat cornea with SD-OCT. Custom-made contact lenses were developed based on the OCT measurements. Incubation of contact lenses in a F. solani suspension resulted in biofilm formation. We induced contact lens-associated Fusarium keratitis by fitting the rat eyes for 4 h with the Fusarium-contaminated contact lenses. The SD-OCT images of the cornea correlated well with the slit-lamp and histopathological results and clearly defined clinical signs of infection, namely, increased corneal thickening, loss of epithelial continuity, hyper-reflective areas representing infiltrates, and endothelial plaques characteristic of fungal infection. Moreover, in three cases, SD-OCT detected the infection without any clear findings on slit-lamp examination. Infection was confirmed with histological fungal staining, PCR, and microbiological culture positivity.We developed a highly reproducible rat contact lens model and successfully induced contact lens-associated Fusarium keratitis in this model. The clinical presentation of contact lens-associated Fusarium keratitis in the rat model is similar to the human condition. SD-OCT is a valuable tool that non-invasively revealed characteristic signs of the fungal infection and could provide sensitive, objective monitoring in fungal keratitis.
Endophthalmitis caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans after cataract surgery. - Retina (Philadelphia, Pa.)
To report Achromobacter xylosoxidans as a cause of both acute-onset and delayed-onset postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery.A noncomparative consecutive case series of patients with culture-proven A. xylosoxidans endophthalmitis between 1970 and 2012. Cataract surgery and intraocular lens placement were performed in all patients before endophthalmitis. Positive cultures were obtained from the vitreous, capsular bag, and/or the removed intraocular lens.The clinical diagnosis was confirmed in four patients with positive cultures. Two patients with endophthalmitis had a preliminary culture report of Pseudomonas species. In addition to receiving intravitreal antibiotics, all patients underwent capsulectomy and intraocular lens removal at the time of pars plana vitrectomy. Visual acuity at last follow-up was 20/40 or better in 2 (50%) of the 4 patients, but the remaining 2 patients were 20/200 or worse.A. xylosoxidans may be a cause of acute, recurrent, and delayed-onset postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Complete capsulectomy and intraocular lens removal can be considered in recurrent and recalcitrant patients.
Emerging 8-methoxyfluoroquinolone resistance among methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates recovered from patients with endophthalmitis. - Journal of clinical microbiology
Fluoroquinolones remain the most commonly used antimicrobials for the prevention and management of bacterial endophthalmitis. Coagulase-negative staphylococci are the most frequently recovered pathogens. Increasing resistance among this group has paralleled the presence of methicillin resistance. From 2005 to 2010, we recovered 38 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus epidermidis (MSSE) isolates from endophthalmitis patients at our institute, including 15 (39.5%) isolates resistant to gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin, members of the C-8-methoxyfluoroquinolones family. Mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDR) of gyrA and parC were determined and correlated with fluoroquinolone MICs based on Etests of these 15 MSSE isolates. High-level resistance (MIC, >32 μg/ml) to gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin was documented for 46.7% of the MSSE isolates, and low-level resistance (MIC, 2 to 4 μg/ml) was determined for 53.3%. The MICs for ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and ofloxacin were >32 μg/ml for all isolates. The amino acid substitution Ser84Phe in gyrA was found among all isolates. A second mutation in gyrA (Glu88Lys) resulted in high-level resistance to moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin. Almost all (92.8%) isolates presented double point mutations in the parC gene at codons 80 and 84 with different combinations. Eighty-seven percent of the patients had prior exposure to topical 8-methoxyfluoroquinolones. Prior exposure to the 8-methoxyfluoroquinolones may contribute to the selection of MSSE strains containing multiple mutations in the QRDRs of gyrA and parC that results in low- and high-level resistance to these agents.

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