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Dr. Salomao  Faintuch  Md image

Dr. Salomao Faintuch Md

Bidmc 330 Brookline Ave
Boston MA 02215
617 542-2652
Medical School: Other - 1999
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 229713
NPI: 1417989948
Taxonomy Codes:
2085U0001X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Salomao Faintuch is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:35476 Description:Repair venous blockage Average Price:$5,995.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1,711.80
HCPCS Code:36147 Description:Access av dial grft for eval Average Price:$2,949.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$539.66
HCPCS Code:37204 Description:Transcatheter occlusion Average Price:$2,815.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$940.52
HCPCS Code:36247 Description:Ins cath abd/l-ext art 3rd Average Price:$1,014.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$201.15
HCPCS Code:36245 Description:Ins cath abd/l-ext art 1st Average Price:$772.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$153.02
HCPCS Code:36558 Description:Insert tunneled cv cath Average Price:$885.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$276.71
HCPCS Code:36148 Description:Access av dial grft for proc Average Price:$911.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$304.07
HCPCS Code:75978 Description:Repair venous blockage Average Price:$622.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$207.83
HCPCS Code:36556 Description:Insert non-tunnel cv cath Average Price:$376.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$125.52
HCPCS Code:36569 Description:Insert picc cath Average Price:$286.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$95.20
HCPCS Code:74177 Description:Ct abd & pelv w/contrast Average Price:$271.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$90.53
HCPCS Code:36584 Description:Replace picc cath Average Price:$209.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$69.80
HCPCS Code:75894 Description:X-rays transcath therapy Average Price:$204.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$68.29
HCPCS Code:75726 Description:Artery x-rays abdomen Average Price:$173.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$57.92
HCPCS Code:75984 Description:Xray control catheter change Average Price:$109.32 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$36.49
HCPCS Code:93970 Description:Extremity study Average Price:$104.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$34.74
HCPCS Code:93880 Description:Extracranial study Average Price:$92.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$30.78
HCPCS Code:99144 Description:Mod cs by same phys 5 yrs + Average Price:$75.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$25.98
HCPCS Code:93930 Description:Upper extremity study Average Price:$71.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$23.60
HCPCS Code:93923 Description:Upr/lxtr art stdy 3+ lvls Average Price:$68.43 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$22.86
HCPCS Code:93971 Description:Extremity study Average Price:$68.38 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$22.86
HCPCS Code:99211 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$65.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$21.73
HCPCS Code:77001 Description:Fluoroguide for vein device Average Price:$58.06 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$19.39
HCPCS Code:75774 Description:Artery x-ray each vessel Average Price:$55.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$18.32
HCPCS Code:76937 Description:Us guide vascular access Average Price:$46.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$15.44

HCPCS Code Definitions

93930
Duplex scan of upper extremity arteries or arterial bypass grafts; complete bilateral study
93923
Complete bilateral noninvasive physiologic studies of upper or lower extremity arteries, 3 or more levels (eg, for lower extremity: ankle/brachial indices at distal posterior tibial and anterior tibial/dorsalis pedis arteries plus segmental blood pressure measurements with bidirectional Doppler waveform recording and analysis, at 3 or more levels, or ankle/brachial indices at distal posterior tibial and anterior tibial/dorsalis pedis arteries plus segmental volume plethysmography at 3 or more levels, or ankle/brachial indices at distal posterior tibial and anterior tibial/dorsalis pedis arteries plus segmental transcutaneous oxygen tension measurements at 3 or more levels), or single level study with provocative functional maneuvers (eg, measurements with postural provocative tests, or measurements with reactive hyperemia)
75984
Change of percutaneous tube or drainage catheter with contrast monitoring (eg, genitourinary system, abscess), radiological supervision and interpretation
36148
Introduction of needle and/or catheter, arteriovenous shunt created for dialysis (graft/fistula); additional access for therapeutic intervention (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
36147
Introduction of needle and/or catheter, arteriovenous shunt created for dialysis (graft/fistula); initial access with complete radiological evaluation of dialysis access, including fluoroscopy, image documentation and report (includes access of shunt, injection[s] of contrast, and all necessary imaging from the arterial anastomosis and adjacent artery through entire venous outflow including the inferior or superior vena cava)
35476
Transluminal balloon angioplasty, percutaneous; venous
36584
Replacement, complete, of a peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC), without subcutaneous port or pump, through same venous access
36247
Selective catheter placement, arterial system; initial third order or more selective abdominal, pelvic, or lower extremity artery branch, within a vascular family
36558
Insertion of tunneled centrally inserted central venous catheter, without subcutaneous port or pump; age 5 years or older
36245
Selective catheter placement, arterial system; each first order abdominal, pelvic, or lower extremity artery branch, within a vascular family
36556
Insertion of non-tunneled centrally inserted central venous catheter; age 5 years or older
75978
Transluminal balloon angioplasty, venous (eg, subclavian stenosis), radiological supervision and interpretation
36569
Insertion of peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC), without subcutaneous port or pump; age 5 years or older
74177
Computed tomography, abdomen and pelvis; with contrast material(s)
75894
Transcatheter therapy, embolization, any method, radiological supervision and interpretation
75726
Angiography, visceral, selective or supraselective (with or without flush aortogram), radiological supervision and interpretation
75774
Angiography, selective, each additional vessel studied after basic examination, radiological supervision and interpretation (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
76937
Ultrasound guidance for vascular access requiring ultrasound evaluation of potential access sites, documentation of selected vessel patency, concurrent realtime ultrasound visualization of vascular needle entry, with permanent recording and reporting (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
77001
Fluoroscopic guidance for central venous access device placement, replacement (catheter only or complete), or removal (includes fluoroscopic guidance for vascular access and catheter manipulation, any necessary contrast injections through access site or catheter with related venography radiologic supervision and interpretation, and radiographic documentation of final catheter position) (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
93880
Duplex scan of extracranial arteries; complete bilateral study
93970
Duplex scan of extremity veins including responses to compression and other maneuvers; complete bilateral study
93971
Duplex scan of extremity veins including responses to compression and other maneuvers; unilateral or limited study
99211
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, that may not require the presence of a physician or other qualified health care professional. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are minimal. Typically, 5 minutes are spent performing or supervising these services.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1730161142
Nephrology
629
1497735500
Internal Medicine
573
1184653891
Nephrology
521
1184661134
Nephrology
504
1104895556
Nephrology
429
1053358747
Diagnostic Radiology
378
1740288943
Nephrology
342
1023042835
Internal Medicine
330
1013943026
Diagnostic Radiology
270
1710933411
Nephrology
270
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Faintuch has made to other doctors

Publications

Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Cirrhotic Patients with Portal Hypertension: Relevance of Hagen-Poiseuille's Law. - Liver cancer
Hepatic decompensation in cirrhosis heralds an accelerated course with poor survival. An increase in hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG), rather than surrogate tests of liver function, appears to be the sole predictor of decompensation after surgical resection. We propose that hepatic sinusoidal walls become less elastic as cirrhosis progresses. Decompensation signals the development of increased vessel wall rigidity. The pressure-flow characteristics then become subject to Hagen-Poiseuille's law, which applies only to rigid, cylindrical vessels. Thereafter, HVPG rises exponentially (by a factor inversely proportional to the fourth power of the net radius of functional sinusoidal vessels, 1/r(4), at any given hepatic blood flow rate. This review attempts to correlate liver stiffness, risk of decompensation and outcomes from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with cirrhosis.We compare the complexity of autoregulation in the normal elastic liver, which has a unique dual blood supply, with that in the rigid cirrhotic liver. We also review, in the context of background liver cirrhosis, the management of HCC which is in essence, a solid mass of unorganized cells that exacerbates liver stiffness. We discuss the differential effects of various therapeutic modalities such as liver transplantation, loco-regional therapy and drugs on HCC outcomes, based on their effects on HVPG.Increased hepatic artery supply, or the hepatic artery buffer response, may be the only available method for autoregulation or maintenance of hepatic blood flow in the cirrhotic liver. In HCC, loco-regional therapies, including partial resection of the cirrhotic liver, can exacerbate portal hypertension by increasing blood flow within the remnant organ. We conclude that studies of HVPG reduction as part of HCC management may be beneficial and are warranted.
Utility of liver biopsy in predicting clinical outcomes after percutaneous angioplasty for hepatic venous obstruction in liver transplant patients. - World journal of hepatology
To determine utility of transplant liver biopsy in evaluating efficacy of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for hepatic venous obstruction (HVOO).Adult liver transplant patients treated with PTA for HVOO (2003-2013) at a single institution were reviewed for pre/post-PTA imaging findings, manometry (gradient with right atrium), presence of HVOO on pre-PTA and post-PTA early and late biopsy (EB and LB, < or > 60 d after PTA), and clinical outcome, defined as good (no clinical issues, non-HVOO-related death) or poor (surgical correction, recurrent HVOO, or HVOO-related death).Fifteen patients meeting inclusion criteria underwent 21 PTA, 658 ± 1293 d after transplant. In procedures with pre-PTA biopsy (n = 19), no difference was seen between pre-PTA gradient in 13/19 procedures with HVOO on biopsy and 6/19 procedures without HVOO (8 ± 2.4 mmHg vs 6.8 ± 4.3 mmHg; P = 0.35). Post-PTA, 10/21 livers had EB (29 ± 21 d) and 9/21 livers had LB (153 ± 81 d). On clinical follow-up (392 ± 773 d), HVOO on LB resulted in poor outcomes and absence of HVOO on LB resulted good outcomes. Patients with HVOO on EB (3/7 good, 4/7 poor) and no HVOO on EB (2/3 good, 1/3 poor) had mixed outcomes.Negative liver biopsy greater than 60 d after PTA accurately identifies patients with good clinical outcomes.
The risk of acute kidney injury with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. - Journal of nephrology
Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) have been used for almost 40 years as a safe and effective alternative to surgical shunts, mostly in the setting of portal hypertension. Well described procedural complications include hepatic encephalopathy, hemorrhage, liver infarction and failure. The risk of post procedural acute kidney injury (AKI) associated with intraprocedural intravenous contrast administration has not been evaluated. Using a retrospective chart review of all consecutive patients undergoing a TIPS procedure as part of routine clinical care between 2001 and 2011, we examined whether the volume of administered intravenous contrast was associated with AKI. Of 163 patients who had a TIPS procedure, 16 % developed AKI as defined by a 0.3 mg/dl increase in serum creatinine within 48 h of the procedure. In adjusted analysis, a 50 ml increase of intravenous contrast was associated with a 1.27 (95 % CI 1.01-1.60), p = 0.04 increased risk of AKI. Baseline serum creatinine was also associated with post procedural AKI; a 0.1 mg/dl increase in creatinine was associated with a 1.17 (1.04-1.31), p = 0.008 risk. In patients with underlying kidney dysfunction, a 50 ml increase of intravenous contrast was associated with a 1.63 (1.20-2.31), p = 0.003 adjusted risk of AKI. In conclusion, intravenous contrast administered during a TIPS procedure is associated with an increased risk of AKI, particularly in patients with impaired renal function at baseline.
Hepatic capsular avulsion after video-assisted thoracic biopsy of the lung. - The Annals of thoracic surgery
We report a life-threatening subcapsular hepatic hemorrhage after VATS, successfully treated with Gelfoam embolization of the right hepatic artery. The postprocedure course was complicated by infarction of the right hepatic lobe.Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Hagen-Poiseuille's law: The link between cirrhosis, liver stiffness, portal hypertension and hepatic decompensation. - World journal of hepatology
The onset of hepatic decompensation in cirrhosis heralds an accelerated downhill course with poor outcome. The sole predictor of this decompensation in cirrhosis is increased hepatic vein to portal vein gradient hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG). Surrogate markers of liver function or hepatic reserve appear to be less relevant. The hepatic sinusoids become less elastic and more rigid as liver fibrosis and cirrhosis progress. We propose that the Hagen-Poiseuille's law, which applies to rigid, but not elastic vessels, determines the pressure-flow characteristics in the sinusoids. In the rigid cirrhotic liver, HVPG rises dramatically with any change in net surface area or radius, r(4) of the vasculature that follows surgical resection. This review relates liver stiffness to the risk of decompensation in patients with cirrhosis. The liver has a unique dual blood supply comprising a low pressure portal vein and high pressure hepatic artery. We compare the complexity of autoregulation in the normal elastic liver with that in the rigid cirrhotic liver. Therapeutic modalities to reduce portal pressure may reduce the risk of hepatic decompensation and improve outcomes in cirrhosis.
Superselective splenic artery embolization for the management of splenic laceration following colonoscopy. - Acta radiologica short reports
Splenic injury is a rare complication following colonoscopy with fewer than 100 reported cases worldwide to date. We describe a case of splenic laceration presenting 5 days following diagnostic colonoscopy. Although hemodynamically stable, active contrast extravasation on contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography predicted likely failure of conservative management. Splenic artery angiography confirmed active extravasation from the lower splenic pole and the patient was successfully treated with super selective coil embolization of a lower pole splenic artery branch. This is the eighth reported case of endovascular treatment of splenic injury following colonoscopy. To our knowledge, however, superselective splenic artery embolization has not been previously reported to treat this rare endoscopic complication.
Radiofrequency ablation for breast cancer. - Techniques in vascular and interventional radiology
Although breast-conserving therapy or mastectomy remains the gold standard for breast cancer treatment, minimally invasive alternatives to surgery are becoming more attractive for select patient populations. Advances in technology, reduced morbidity, improved cosmesis, and the ability to provide treatment in an outpatient setting are some of the advantages of image-guided therapy. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been investigated because of its relatively low cost, low morbidity, and favorable technical success rates (76%-100% in published series). Image guidance during ablation involves the use of real-time ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging to target the tumor and monitor the adequacy of ablation. Tumor size, location, histologic type, and reliable visualization under ultrasound (or other imaging modalities) are important to determine patient eligibility and procedural planning. In patients with localized breast cancer who decline surgery or are not candidates for surgery, RFA alone, or in combination with hormonal therapy, or followed by conventional radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy may prove to be viable treatment options. In patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease, RFA may be suitable for palliation of larger symptomatic tumors. Additional studies with long-term patient follow-up are necessary to better understand response to RFA and to determine its future role in the treatment algorithm for breast cancer.Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Preparation for percutaneous ablation procedures. - Techniques in vascular and interventional radiology
Percutaneous tumor ablation is now commonly used to treat a wide range of focal tumors. Patients eligible for ablation often have complex medical problems that preclude them from receiving other treatments. The interventional radiologist needs to perform a careful clinical evaluation of each patient before the procedure to determine which patients are suitable candidates for treatment and to identify patients who may be at a higher risk for complications. The clinical consultation also provides an opportunity to prepare the patient for the ablation and to appropriately plan the procedure. In this article, we discuss key components of the consultation and concepts regarding patient evaluation and preparation for a tumor ablation procedure.Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Do colorectal cancer resections improve diabetes in long-term survivors? A case-control study. - Surgical endoscopy
A clinical study was designed that aimed to analyze whether resection of the large bowel in cancer patients might benefit diabetes mellitus.This prospective case-control study included retrospective information. Patients (n = 247) included diabetic and euglycemic groups with colorectal cancer operations (n = 60), cancer gastrectomy (n = 72), exclusive chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer (n = 46), and noncancer clinical controls (n = 69). Follow-up periods were, respectively, 79.2 ± 27.4, 86.8 ± 25.1, 70.0 ± 26.3, and 85.1 ± 18.2 months (NS). Diabetes groups included patients with prediabetes.Diabetes remission, defined as conversion from diabetes to prediabetes or from this condition to normal, was documented in, respectively, 32.4 % (11 of 34), 41.2 % (14 of 34), 7.1 % (1 of 14), and 7.7 % (3 of 39) in the four cohorts (P = 0.004). Within the same period, progression of euglycemic participants to diabetes occurred in 30.8 % (8 of 26), 63.2 % (24 of 38), 25.0 (8 of 32), and 20.0 % (6 of 30) (P = 0.028). Diabetes amelioration was associated with weight loss in gastrectomy patients but not in the other groups. Dietary intake, estimated in the two surgical populations, did not predict outcome.Diabetes amelioration after colorectal interventions was demonstrated, but progression of euglycemic patients toward prediabetes was not changed in comparison with nonsurgical controls. It is speculated that reshaping of the bowel microbiome or hormone changes after colorectal interventions underlay the improvement in diabetes. Body weight fluctuations could not be incriminated in this investigation.
Embolization therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia: influence of embolization particle size on gland perfusion. - Journal of magnetic resonance imaging : JMRI
To assess the influence of embolic size on the therapy response of prostatic arterial embolization (PAE) based on perfusional changes seen on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Twelve beagles underwent PAE, four dogs with each particle size: A: 100-300 μm; B: 300-500 μm; and C: 500-700 μm. Prior to and 1 month after the embolization all dogs underwent prostate DCE MRI.After embolization, time to maximal perfusion intensity for prostate parenchyma increased in B (188 vs. 135 sec, P = 0.023) and C (200 vs. 120 sec, P = 0.001), while it did not change for A (139 vs. 124 sec, P = 0.39). The maximal relative intensity increased after embolization in C (3.84 vs. 2.38, P < 0.001), while it did not change for A (2.50 vs. 2.44, P = 0.36) and B (3.23 vs. 2.9, P = 0.21). The extent of visualized intraprostatic urethral wall increased after embolization in B compared with A and C, 239.5 ± 138.1% vs. 56.1 ± 34.3, P = 0.04. Enhancement changes correlated with prostate volume changes: prostate volumes in A decreased less as compared with B and C (77 ± 34% vs. 56 ± 14%), P = 0.02.The enhancement and morphological data are useful to monitor response to therapy after embolization. Embolization with 300-500 and 500-700 μm particle may provide better results than with 100-300 μm particles in a canine model.Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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Bidmc 330 Brookline Ave Boston, MA 02215
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