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Dr. Pamela  Allweiss  Md image

Dr. Pamela Allweiss Md

228 N Upper St
Lexington KY 40507
859 331-1112
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 22777
NPI: 1396047171
Taxonomy Codes:
207RE0101X

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Publications

Chronic conditions and household preparedness for public health emergencies: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2006-2010. - Prehospital and disaster medicine
Individuals with chronic conditions often experience exacerbation of those conditions and have specialized medical needs after a disaster. Less is known about the level of disaster preparedness of this particular population and the extent to which being prepared might have an impact on the risk of disease exacerbation. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between self-reported asthma, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes and levels of household disaster preparedness.Data were analyzed from 14 US states participating in the 2006-2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a large state-based telephone survey. Chi-square statistics and adjusted prevalence ratios were calculated.After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, as compared to those without each condition, persons with cardiovascular disease (aPR = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01-1.17) and diabetes (aPR = 1.13; 95% CI, 1.05-1.22) were slightly more likely to have an evacuation plan and individuals with diabetes (aPR = 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02-1.05) and asthma (aPR = 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04) were slightly more likely to have a 3-day supply of prescription medication. There were no statistically significant differences in the prevalence for all other preparedness measures (3-day supply of food and water, working radio and flashlight, willingness to leave during a mandatory evacuation) between those with and those without each chronic condition.Despite the increased morbidity and mortality associated with chronic conditions, persons with diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and asthma were generally not more prepared for natural or man-made disasters than those without each chronic condition.
Addressing diabetes and depression in the school setting; the role of school nurses. - NASN school nurse (Print)
What Can School Nurses Do to Address Diabetes and Depression in the School Setting? 1. Remember that depression and diabetes are common comorbidities. If you see signs of depression, remember to obtain the appropriate consent and approvals for students under the age of 18 before screening. 2. Remember that depression can interfere with self-management skills and may make diabetes worse--so connect students to community resources to help them reduce the risk of complications. 3. Remember that depression and risk-taking behaviors are common in adolescents with diabetes. Have educational materials ready and available to help students in need.
Advancing workplace health protection and promotion for an aging workforce. - Journal of occupational and environmental medicine / American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
To explore issues related to the aging workforce, including barriers to integrating health protection and promotion programs, and provide recommendations for best practices to maximize contributions by aging workers.Workgroups reviewed literature and case studies to develop consensus statements and recommendations for a national approach to issues related to older workers.Consensus statements and actions steps were identified for each of the Summit goals and call-to-action statements were developed.A national dialogue to build awareness of integrated health protection and promotion for the aging workforce is needed. Workers will benefit from improved health and performance; employers will realize a more engaged and productive workforce; and the nation will gain a vital, competitive workforce.
Diabetes and oral disease: implications for health professionals. - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
"Diabetes and Oral Disease: Implications for Health Professionals" was a one-day conference convened by the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine, the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the New York Academy of Sciences on May 4, 2011 in New York City. The program included an examination of the bidirectional relationship between oral disease and diabetes and the interprofessional working relationships for the care of people who have diabetes. The overall goal of the conference was to promote discussion among the healthcare professions who treat people with diabetes, encourage improved communication and collaboration among them, and, ultimately, improve patient management of the oral and overall effects of diabetes. Attracting over 150 members of the medical and dental professions from eight different countries, the conference included speakers from academia and government and was divided into four sessions. This report summarizes the scientific presentations of the event.© 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.
Integrating complementary and alternative medicine instruction into health professions education: organizational and instructional strategies. - Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
A few years ago, the National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine funded a program called the Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Education Project. Grantees were 14 medical and nursing schools and the American Medical Student Association, which funded six additional medical schools. Grants were awarded in cohorts of five per year in 2000, 2001, and 2002-2003. The R25 grant recipients identified several major themes as crucial to the success of integrating CAM into health professions curricula. The rationale for integrating CAM curricula was in part to enable future health professionals to provide informed advice as patients dramatically increase the use of CAM. Success of new CAM education programs relied on leadership, including top-down support from institutions' highest administrators. Formal and informal engagement of key faculty and opinion leaders raised awareness, interest, and participation in programs. A range of faculty development efforts increased CAM-teaching capacity. The most effective strategies for integration addressed a key curriculum need and used some form of evidence-based practice framework. Most programs used a combination of instructional delivery strategies, including experiential components and online resources, to address the needs of learners while promoting a high level of ongoing interest in CAM topics. Institutions noted several benefits, including increased faculty development activities, the creation of new programs, and increased cross- and inter-university collaborations. Common challenges included the need for qualified faculty, crowded and changing curricula, a lack of defined best practices in CAM, and post-grant sustainability of programs.

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228 N Upper St Lexington, KY 40507
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