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Dr. Gwyneth  Mccawley  Md image

Dr. Gwyneth Mccawley Md

300 Pasteur Dr Room A343
Stanford CA 94305
650 236-6469
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: A119230
NPI: 1396046595
Taxonomy Codes:
2084N0400X

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Publications

Cancer in obese women: potential protective impact of bariatric surgery. - Journal of the American College of Surgeons
The use of bariatric surgery has been increasing over the last several years in response to the obesity epidemic, and the objective of this study was to report on the types of cancer in morbidly obese women undergoing bariatric surgery and compare these with types of cancer in obese women without surgery.A retrospective, observational study was conducted. The bariatric surgery database identified women who underwent operations between 1990 and 2006 at the University of Virginia. Medical records and the institution's and state's cancer registries were searched for demographics and cancer data. Morbidly obese patients not undergoing bariatric surgery were used for comparison.There were 1,482 women who had bariatric surgery, and 53 of these (3.6%) were diagnosed with cancer. The most common cancer site was the breast (n = 15, 28.3%) followed by the endometrium (n = 9, 17%) and the cervix (n = 6, 11.3%). The mean age at cancer diagnosis was 39.4 years. Most cancers (n = 34, 64.1%) were diagnosed before the bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery patients with cancer were older than noncancer patients at time of surgery (mean age 44.7 versus 41.6 years; p=0.019), but otherwise did not differ significantly with regard to race, body mass index, or comorbid conditions. Compared with a control group of 3,495 morbidly obese women who had not undergone bariatric surgery, the surgery patients had fewer cancers (3.6% versus 5.8%, p=0.002), were younger (41.7 versus 46.9 years, p < 0.001), and were younger at cancer diagnosis (45.0 versus 56.8 years, p < 0.001). The most frequent cancers in the control obese women were endometrial, ovarian, and breast cancer. Both groups of obese women with endometrial, breast, ovarian, and colorectal cancers were younger at diagnosis compared with Virginia Cancer Registry means.Breast and endometrial cancers remain the most common types in obese women and may occur at young ages; bariatric surgery may decrease cancer development in obese women.
Lexical acquisition in progressive aphasia and frontotemporal dementia. - Cognitive neuropsychology
We investigated the characteristics of language difficulty in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) by exposing these patients to a new verb in a naturalistic manner and then assessing acquisition of the grammatical, semantic, and thematic matrix information associated with the new word. We found that FTD patients have difficulty relative to healthy seniors in their acquisition of the new verb, but that progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), semantic dementia (SD), and social/dysexecutive variant (SOC/EXEC) subgroups of FTD demonstrate relatively distinct impairment profiles. Specifically, PNFA patients showed relative difficulty assigning the new verb to its correct grammatical form class, reflecting compromised processing of the associated grammatical information. SD patients were impaired at associating the new word with its pictorial representation, suggesting impaired processing of the new verb's semantic attributes. SOC/EXEC patients showed their greatest difficulty judging violations of the new word's associated thematic roles, implying that limited executive resources underlie in part the difficulty in integrating grammatical and semantic information into a coherent thematic matrix. Similar impairment profiles were seen during a follow-up session one week after the initial evaluation. These deficits in lexical acquisition reflect the breakdown of a language-processing system that consists of highly interactive but partially dissociable grammatical, semantic, and resource-based components, leading to relatively distinct language-processing deficits in each subgroup of patients with FTD.

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