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Dr. Scott  Martin  Md image

Dr. Scott Martin Md

900 Cooper Ave Suite 4100
Saginaw MI 48602
989 979-9395
Medical School: Other - 2000
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: 4301091365
NPI: 1366527251
Taxonomy Codes:
207P00000X 207R00000X 207RC0000X 207RI0011X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Scott Martin is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:92980 Description:Insert intracoronary stent Average Price:$1,408.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$809.74
HCPCS Code:78452 Description:Ht muscle image spect mult Average Price:$757.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$469.35
HCPCS Code:93459 Description:L hrt art/grft angio Average Price:$540.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$298.45
HCPCS Code:93458 Description:L hrt artery/ventricle angio Average Price:$480.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$258.48
HCPCS Code:93306 Description:Tte w/doppler complete Average Price:$380.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$200.32
HCPCS Code:93351 Description:Stress tte complete Average Price:$394.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$225.82
HCPCS Code:92960 Description:Cardioversion electric ext Average Price:$288.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$120.64
HCPCS Code:93571 Description:Heart flow reserve measure Average Price:$231.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$89.46
HCPCS Code:93325 Description:Doppler color flow add-on Average Price:$158.96 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$25.91
HCPCS Code:92981 Description:Insert intracoronary stent Average Price:$350.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$230.27
HCPCS Code:J2785 Description:Regadenoson injection Average Price:$156.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$53.04
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$292.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$191.89
HCPCS Code:93320 Description:Doppler echo exam heart Average Price:$136.80 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$50.38
HCPCS Code:93015 Description:Cardiovascular stress test Average Price:$168.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$83.80
HCPCS Code:93312 Description:Echo transesophageal Average Price:$175.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$104.13
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$198.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$130.22
HCPCS Code:93922 Description:Upr/l xtremity art 2 levels Average Price:$135.05 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$70.23
HCPCS Code:99233 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$155.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$98.20
HCPCS Code:99219 Description:Initial observation care Average Price:$184.07 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$127.36
HCPCS Code:93306 Description:Tte w/doppler complete Average Price:$116.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$63.30
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$207.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$155.80
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$150.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$99.50
HCPCS Code:93350 Description:Stress tte only Average Price:$121.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$71.31
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$108.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$68.44
HCPCS Code:A9502 Description:Tc99m tetrofosmin Average Price:$151.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$113.87
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$135.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$100.33
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$99.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$67.92
HCPCS Code:93307 Description:Tte w/o doppler complete Average Price:$75.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$44.97
HCPCS Code:99231 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$60.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$37.43
HCPCS Code:93000 Description:Electrocardiogram complete Average Price:$40.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$18.14
HCPCS Code:93924 Description:Lwr xtr vasc stdy bilat Average Price:$44.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$24.44
HCPCS Code:93016 Description:Cardiovascular stress test Average Price:$41.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$21.60
HCPCS Code:93308 Description:Tte f-up or lmtd Average Price:$44.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$25.32
HCPCS Code:93923 Description:Upr/lxtr art stdy 3+ lvls Average Price:$39.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$21.80
HCPCS Code:93923 Description:Upr/lxtr art stdy 3+ lvls Average Price:$39.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$21.80
HCPCS Code:93227 Description:Ecg monit/reprt up to 48 hrs Average Price:$40.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$25.71
HCPCS Code:93320 Description:Doppler echo exam heart Average Price:$32.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$18.32
HCPCS Code:93228 Description:Remote 30 day ecg rev/report Average Price:$38.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$25.07
HCPCS Code:93018 Description:Cardiovascular stress test Average Price:$25.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$14.66
HCPCS Code:J0280 Description:Aminophyllin 250 MG inj Average Price:$10.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$0.49
HCPCS Code:93010 Description:Electrocardiogram report Average Price:$15.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$8.35
HCPCS Code:93321 Description:Doppler echo exam heart Average Price:$14.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$7.35

HCPCS Code Definitions

93923
Complete bilateral noninvasive physiologic studies of upper or lower extremity arteries, 3 or more levels (eg, for lower extremity: ankle/brachial indices at distal posterior tibial and anterior tibial/dorsalis pedis arteries plus segmental blood pressure measurements with bidirectional Doppler waveform recording and analysis, at 3 or more levels, or ankle/brachial indices at distal posterior tibial and anterior tibial/dorsalis pedis arteries plus segmental volume plethysmography at 3 or more levels, or ankle/brachial indices at distal posterior tibial and anterior tibial/dorsalis pedis arteries plus segmental transcutaneous oxygen tension measurements at 3 or more levels), or single level study with provocative functional maneuvers (eg, measurements with postural provocative tests, or measurements with reactive hyperemia)
93016
Cardiovascular stress test using maximal or submaximal treadmill or bicycle exercise, continuous electrocardiographic monitoring, and/or pharmacological stress; supervision only, without interpretation and report
J2785
Injection, regadenoson, 0.1 mg
93010
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; interpretation and report only
93015
Cardiovascular stress test using maximal or submaximal treadmill or bicycle exercise, continuous electrocardiographic monitoring, and/or pharmacological stress; with supervision, interpretation and report
93000
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; with interpretation and report
93306
Echocardiography, transthoracic, real-time with image documentation (2D), includes M-mode recording, when performed, complete, with spectral Doppler echocardiography, and with color flow Doppler echocardiography
A9502
Technetium tc-99m tetrofosmin, diagnostic, per study dose
78452
Myocardial perfusion imaging, tomographic (SPECT) (including attenuation correction, qualitative or quantitative wall motion, ejection fraction by first pass or gated technique, additional quantification, when performed); multiple studies, at rest and/or stress (exercise or pharmacologic) and/or redistribution and/or rest reinjection
99233
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
93018
Cardiovascular stress test using maximal or submaximal treadmill or bicycle exercise, continuous electrocardiographic monitoring, and/or pharmacological stress; interpretation and report only
93227
External electrocardiographic recording up to 48 hours by continuous rhythm recording and storage; review and interpretation by a physician or other qualified health care professional
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
93228
External mobile cardiovascular telemetry with electrocardiographic recording, concurrent computerized real time data analysis and greater than 24 hours of accessible ECG data storage (retrievable with query) with ECG triggered and patient selected events transmitted to a remote attended surveillance center for up to 30 days; review and interpretation with report by a physician or other qualified health care professional
93924
Noninvasive physiologic studies of lower extremity arteries, at rest and following treadmill stress testing, (ie, bidirectional Doppler waveform or volume plethysmography recording and analysis at rest with ankle/brachial indices immediately after and at timed intervals following performance of a standardized protocol on a motorized treadmill plus recording of time of onset of claudication or other symptoms, maximal walking time, and time to recovery) complete bilateral study
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99219
Initial observation care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission to "observation status" are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99231
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused interval history; A problem focused examination; Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is stable, recovering or improving. Typically, 15 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
92960
Cardioversion, elective, electrical conversion of arrhythmia; external
93922
Limited bilateral noninvasive physiologic studies of upper or lower extremity arteries, (eg, for lower extremity: ankle/brachial indices at distal posterior tibial and anterior tibial/dorsalis pedis arteries plus bidirectional, Doppler waveform recording and analysis at 1-2 levels, or ankle/brachial indices at distal posterior tibial and anterior tibial/dorsalis pedis arteries plus volume plethysmography at 1-2 levels, or ankle/brachial indices at distal posterior tibial and anterior tibial/dorsalis pedis arteries with, transcutaneous oxygen tension measurement at 1-2 levels)
93307
Echocardiography, transthoracic, real-time with image documentation (2D), includes M-mode recording, when performed, complete, without spectral or color Doppler echocardiography
93306
Echocardiography, transthoracic, real-time with image documentation (2D), includes M-mode recording, when performed, complete, with spectral Doppler echocardiography, and with color flow Doppler echocardiography
93320
Doppler echocardiography, pulsed wave and/or continuous wave with spectral display (List separately in addition to codes for echocardiographic imaging); complete
93312
Echocardiography, transesophageal, real-time with image documentation (2D) (with or without M-mode recording); including probe placement, image acquisition, interpretation and report
93308
Echocardiography, transthoracic, real-time with image documentation (2D), includes M-mode recording, when performed, follow-up or limited study
J0280
Injection, aminophyllin, up to 250 mg
93923
Complete bilateral noninvasive physiologic studies of upper or lower extremity arteries, 3 or more levels (eg, for lower extremity: ankle/brachial indices at distal posterior tibial and anterior tibial/dorsalis pedis arteries plus segmental blood pressure measurements with bidirectional Doppler waveform recording and analysis, at 3 or more levels, or ankle/brachial indices at distal posterior tibial and anterior tibial/dorsalis pedis arteries plus segmental volume plethysmography at 3 or more levels, or ankle/brachial indices at distal posterior tibial and anterior tibial/dorsalis pedis arteries plus segmental transcutaneous oxygen tension measurements at 3 or more levels), or single level study with provocative functional maneuvers (eg, measurements with postural provocative tests, or measurements with reactive hyperemia)
93571
Intravascular Doppler velocity and/or pressure derived coronary flow reserve measurement (coronary vessel or graft) during coronary angiography including pharmacologically induced stress; initial vessel (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
93351
Echocardiography, transthoracic, real-time with image documentation (2D), includes M-mode recording, when performed, during rest and cardiovascular stress test using treadmill, bicycle exercise and/or pharmacologically induced stress, with interpretation and report; including performance of continuous electrocardiographic monitoring, with supervision by a physician or other qualified health care professional
93321
Doppler echocardiography, pulsed wave and/or continuous wave with spectral display (List separately in addition to codes for echocardiographic imaging); follow-up or limited study (List separately in addition to codes for echocardiographic imaging)
93320
Doppler echocardiography, pulsed wave and/or continuous wave with spectral display (List separately in addition to codes for echocardiographic imaging); complete
93325
Doppler echocardiography color flow velocity mapping (List separately in addition to codes for echocardiography)
93350
Echocardiography, transthoracic, real-time with image documentation (2D), includes M-mode recording, when performed, during rest and cardiovascular stress test using treadmill, bicycle exercise and/or pharmacologically induced stress, with interpretation and report
93459
Catheter placement in coronary artery(s) for coronary angiography, including intraprocedural injection(s) for coronary angiography, imaging supervision and interpretation; with left heart catheterization including intraprocedural injection(s) for left ventriculography, when performed, catheter placement(s) in bypass graft(s) (internal mammary, free arterial, venous grafts) with bypass graft angiography
93458
Catheter placement in coronary artery(s) for coronary angiography, including intraprocedural injection(s) for coronary angiography, imaging supervision and interpretation; with left heart catheterization including intraprocedural injection(s) for left ventriculography, when performed

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1427140227
Diagnostic Radiology
3,691
1194796102
Diagnostic Radiology
2,295
1700833514
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
2,145
1770553265
Diagnostic Radiology
2,082
1356396634
Internal Medicine
1,797
1124131719
Internal Medicine
1,601
1780784934
Internal Medicine
1,560
1275616849
Interventional Radiology
1,435
1255436309
Infectious Disease
1,406
1780654343
Diagnostic Radiology
1,396
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Martin has made to other doctors

Publications

Is Subtalar Joint Cartilage Resection Necessary for Tibiotalocalcaneal Arthrodesis via Intramedullary Nail? A Multicenter Evaluation. - The Journal of foot and ankle surgery : official publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with intramedullary nailing is traditionally performed with formal preparation of both the subtalar and ankle joints. However, we believe that subtalar joint preparation is not necessary to achieve satisfactory outcomes in patients undergoing tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with a retrograde intramedullary nail. The primary aim of the present retrospective study was to evaluate the outcomes of patients who had undergone tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with an intramedullary nail without formal subtalar joint cartilage resection. A multicenter medical record review was performed to identify consecutive patients. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale, and osseous union at the tibiotalar joint was defined as bony trabeculation across the arthrodesis site on all 3 radiographic views. Progression of joint deterioration was evaluated across time at the subtalar joint, using a modified grading system developed by Takakura et al. Forty consecutive patients (aged 61.9 ± 12.9 years; 17 men) met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Compared with the pain reported preoperatively (6.4 ± 2.7), a statistically significant decline was seen in the pain experienced after surgery (1.2 ± 1.8; p < .001). The mean time to consolidated arthrodesis at the ankle joint was 3.8 ± 1.5 months. A statistically significant increase in deterioration at the subtalar joint was observed across time [t(36) = -6.200, p < .001]. Compared with previously published data of subtalar joint cartilage resection, the present study has demonstrated a similar decline in pain, with a high rate of union, and also a decrease in operative time when preparation of the subtalar joint was not performed.Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Psychosocial Mediators of the Fitness-Depression Relationship within Adolescents. - Journal of physical activity & health
A lot of evidence showed that boys and girls are at high risk of developing major or minor depression in adolescence. Increases in physical fitness have been associated with lower levels of depressive symptomatology, yet the mechanisms that underlie (or mediate) this relationship have not been thoroughly examined.528 boys (Mage = 12.33 years) and 507 girls (Mage = 12.32 years) drawn from a suburban school district participated. Self-report measures were used to assess the mediators (body satisfaction and social physique anxiety) and the outcome (depression); the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER) in conjunction with age, Body Mass Index [BMI], and sex were used to determine an objective estimate of cardiorespiratory fitness. Path analyses were used to test the proposed models.The effects of fitness on depressive symptomatology were mediated through body satisfaction and social physique anxiety; 25% to 35% of the depression variance was explained.Boys' and girls' depression scores were based on the extent that their fitness levels improved their body satisfaction and lowered their social physique anxiety; body satisfaction was particularly important for girls. Thus, early adolescents' psychological well-being may be enhanced through improvements in aerobic functioning.
Functional Genomic Screening Reveals Splicing of the EWS-FLI1 Fusion Transcript as a Vulnerability in Ewing Sarcoma. - Cell reports
Ewing sarcoma cells depend on the EWS-FLI1 fusion transcription factor for cell survival. Using an assay of EWS-FLI1 activity and genome-wide RNAi screening, we have identified proteins required for the processing of the EWS-FLI1 pre-mRNA. We show that Ewing sarcoma cells harboring a genomic breakpoint that retains exon 8 of EWSR1 require the RNA-binding protein HNRNPH1 to express in-frame EWS-FLI1. We also demonstrate the sensitivity of EWS-FLI1 fusion transcripts to the loss of function of the U2 snRNP component, SF3B1. Disrupted splicing of the EWS-FLI1 transcript alters EWS-FLI1 protein expression and EWS-FLI1-driven expression. Our results show that the processing of the EWS-FLI1 fusion RNA is a potentially targetable vulnerability in Ewing sarcoma cells.Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Frankliniella fusca resistance to neonicotinoid insecticides: an emerging challenge for cotton pest management in the Eastern United States. - Pest management science
Over the past two decades, neonicotinoid seed treatments have become the primary method to manage tobacco thrips, Frankliniella fusca Hinds, on seedling cotton. Because this insect is highly polyphagous and the window of insecticide exposure is short, neonicotinoid resistance was expected to pose a minimal risk. However, reports of higher than expected F. fusca seedling damage in seed-treated cotton fields throughout the Mid-South and Southeastern U.S. production regions suggested neonicotinoid resistance had developed. To document this change, F. fusca populations from 86 different locations in the Eastern U.S. were assayed in 2014 and 2015 for imidacloprid and thiamethoxam resistance to determine the extent of the issue in the region.Approximately 57% and 65% of the F. fusca populations surveyed had reduced imidacloprid and thiamethoxam sensitivity, respectively. Survivorship in diagnostic bioassays was significantly different at both the state- and regional-scales. Multiple dose bioassays conducted on 37 of the populations documented up to 55- and 39-fold resistance ratios for imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, respectively.Estimates of neonicotinoid resistance indicate an emerging issue for management of F. fusca in the Eastern U.S. Significant variation in survivorship within states and regions indicated that finer-scale surveys were needed to determine factors (genetic, insecticide use) driving resistance evolution.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Anticancer Effects of Mesothelin-targeted Immunotoxin Therapy are Regulated by Tyrosine Kinase DDR1. - Cancer research
Recombinant immunotoxins (RITs) have been highly successful in cancer therapy due in part to the high cancer-specific expression of cell-surface antigens such as mesothelin which is overexpressed in mesothelioma, ovarian, lung, breast, and pancreatic cancers, but is limited in normal cells. RG7787 is a clinically optimized RIT consisting of a humanized anti-mesothelin Fab fused to domain III of Pseudomonas exotoxin A in which immunogenic B cell epitopes are silenced. To enhance the therapeutic efficacy of RITs, we conducted a kinome RNAi sensitization screen which identified discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen-activated tyrosine kinase, as a potential target. The collagen/DDR1 axis is implicated in tumor-stromal interactions and potentially affects tumor response to therapy. Therefore, we investigated the effects of DDR1 on RIT. Knockdown of DDR1 by siRNA or treatment with inhibitor, 7rh, greatly enhanced the cytotoxic activity of RG7787 in several cancer cell lines. Investigation into the mechanism of action showed DDR1 silencing was associated with decreased expression of several ribosomal proteins and enhanced inhibition of protein synthesis. Conversely, induction of DDR1 expression or collagen-stimulated DDR1 activity protected cancer cells from RG7787 killing. Moreover, the combination of RG7787 and DDR1 inhibitor caused greater shrinkage of tumor xenografts than either agent alone. These data demonstrate that DDR1 is a key modulator of RIT activity and represents a novel therapeutic strategy to improve targeting of mesothelin-expressing cancers.Copyright © 2015, American Association for Cancer Research.
Microchip-based electrochemical detection using a 3-D printed wall-jet electrode device. - The Analyst
Three dimensional (3-D) printing technology has evolved dramatically in the last few years, offering the capability of printing objects with a variety of materials. Printing microfluidic devices using this technology offers various advantages such as ease and uniformity of fabrication, file sharing between laboratories, and increased device-to-device reproducibility. One unique aspect of this technology, when used with electrochemical detection, is the ability to produce a microfluidic device as one unit while also allowing the reuse of the device and electrode for multiple analyses. Here we present an alternate electrode configuration for microfluidic devices, a wall-jet electrode (WJE) approach, created by 3-D printing. Using microchip-based flow injection analysis, we compared the WJE design with the conventionally used thin-layer electrode (TLE) design. It was found that the optimized WJE system enhances analytical performance (as compared to the TLE design), with improvements in sensitivity and the limit of detection. Experiments were conducted using two working electrodes - 500 μm platinum and 1 mm glassy carbon. Using the 500 μm platinum electrode the calibration sensitivity was 16 times higher for the WJE device (as compared to the TLE design). In addition, use of the 1 mm glassy carbon electrode led to limit of detection of 500 nM for catechol, as compared to 6 μM for the TLE device. Finally, to demonstrate the versatility and applicability of the 3-D printed WJE approach, the device was used as an inexpensive electrochemical detector for HPLC. The number of theoretical plates was comparable to the use of commercially available UV and MS detectors, with the WJE device being inexpensive to utilize. These results show that 3-D-printing can be a powerful tool to fabricate reusable and integrated microfluidic detectors in configurations that are not easily achieved with more traditional lithographic methods.
Aurora B kinase is a potent and selective target in MYCN-driven neuroblastoma. - Oncotarget
Despite advances in multimodal treatment, neuroblastoma (NB) is often fatal for children with high-risk disease and many survivors need to cope with long-term side effects from high-dose chemotherapy and radiation. To identify new therapeutic targets, we performed an siRNA screen of the druggable genome combined with a small molecule screen of 465 compounds targeting 39 different mechanisms of actions in four NB cell lines. We identified 58 genes as targets, including AURKB, in at least one cell line. In the drug screen, aurora kinase inhibitors (nine molecules) and in particular the AURKB-selective compound, barasertib, were the most discriminatory with regard to sensitivity for MYCN-amplified cell lines. In an expanded panel of ten NB cell lines, those with MYCN-amplification and wild-type TP53 were the most sensitive to low nanomolar concentrations of barasertib. Inhibition of the AURKB kinase activity resulted in decreased phosphorylation of the known target, histone H3, and upregulation of TP53 in MYCN-amplified, TP53 wild-type cells. However, both wild-type and TP53 mutant MYCN-amplified cell lines arrested in G2/M phase upon AURKB inhibition. Additionally, barasertib induced endoreduplication and apoptosis. Treatment of MYCN-amplified/TP53 wild-type neuroblastoma xenografts resulted in profound growth inhibition and tumor regression. Therefore, aurora B kinase inhibition is highly effective in aggressive neuroblastoma and warrants further investigation in clinical trials.
Transfer Hydrogenation Employing Ethylene Diamine Bisborane in Water and Pd- and Ru-Nanoparticles in Ionic Liquids. - Molecules (Basel, Switzerland)
Herein we demonstrate the use of ethylenediamine bisborane (EDAB) as a suitable hydrogen source for transfer hydrogenation reactions on C-C double bonds mediated by metal nanoparticles. Moreover, EDAB also acts as a reducing agent for carbonyl functionalities in water under metal-free conditions.
Athletes' Expectations About Sport Injury Rehabilitation: A Cross-Cultural Study. - Journal of sport rehabilitation
Athletes enter injury rehabilitation with certain expectations about the recovery process, outcomes, and the professional providing treatment. Their expectations influence the effectiveness of the assistance received and affect the overall rehabilitation process. Expectations may vary depending on numerous factors such as sport experience, gender, sport-type and cultural background. Unfortunately, limited information is available on athletes' expectations about sport injury rehabilitation.To examine possible differences in athletes' expectations about sport injury rehabilitation based on their country of residence and type of sport (physical contact versus non-physical contact).A cross-sectional design.Recreational, collegiate, and professional athletes from the United States (US), United Kingdom (UK) and Finland were surveyed.Of the 1209 athletes ranging from 12 to 80 years of age (Mage = 23.46 ± 7.91), of which 529 US [80%], 253 UK [86%], and 199 Finnish [82%] provided details of their geographical location, were included in the final analyses.The Expectations about Athletic Training (EAAT) questionnaire was used to determine athletes' expectations about personal commitment, facilitative conditions, and the expertise of the sports medicine professional (Clement et al., 2012).3x2 MANCOVA revealed significant main effects for country (p = .0001, ηp2 = .055) and sport type (p = .0001, ηp2 = .023). Specifically, US athletes were found to have higher expectations of personal commitment and facilitative conditions than their UK and Finnish counterparts. Athletes participating in physical contact sports had higher expectations of facilitative conditions and the expertise of the sports medicine professional (SMP) as compared to athletes participating in non-physical contact sports.SMPs, especially those in the US, should consider the sport and environment when providing services. In addition, SMPs need to highlight and demonstrate their expertise during the rehabilitation process, especially for those who compete in physical contact sports.
Trajectories and correlates of reasons for abstaining or limiting drinking during adolescence. - Addictive behaviors
Our aim was to enhance understanding of the trajectory of reasons for abstaining and limiting drinking (RALD) over the course of adolescence and how RALD levels or trajectories may differ based on lifetime experience with alcohol and/or gender.Participants were 1023 middle school students (52% female) who completed online surveys at baseline and five follow-ups over a 3-year period, assessing lifetime sip and full drink of alcohol and RALD. Hierarchical linear models were used to estimate change over time in total RALD and RALD subscales (upbringing, performance/control). Between-person (gender and drinking status) correlates of average RALD and change in RALD over time were considered.RALD total and subscale scores significantly decreased over time (ages 10.5-16.5). Drinking experience in both milestones (sip, full drink) was found to be a significant moderator of change in RALD over time; decline was fastest among adolescents reporting lifetime experience with drinking. Boys reported lower RALD, though the pace of change in RALD across time did not differ by gender.This was the first study to report prospective changes in the cognitive domain of RALD among young adolescents. That change over time in RALD is moderated by drinking experience suggests an increased risk among those with earlier drinking experience. Findings highlight the importance of considering sipping, not just consumption of a full drink, as a pivotal developmental milestone. Prevention efforts that target RALD are implicated and parent-based intervention strategies may be beneficial.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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