Docality.com Logo
 
Dr. Sandra  Lee  Md image

Dr. Sandra Lee Md

1 Hatfield Ln
Goshen NY 10924
845 605-5530
Medical School: State University Of New York Downstate Medical Center - 1994
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 201832
NPI: 1366450850
Taxonomy Codes:
207P00000X

Request Appointment Information

Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Sandra Lee is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$509.81 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$165.09
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$335.01 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$108.39
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$330.27 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$107.14
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$220.14 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$72.56
HCPCS Code:81002 Description:Urinalysis nonauto w/o scope Average Price:$32.61 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.62
HCPCS Code:J7613 Description:Albuterol non-comp unit Average Price:$27.73 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$0.06
HCPCS Code:87880 Description:Strep a assay w/optic Average Price:$31.67 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.39

HCPCS Code Definitions

99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
J7613
Albuterol, inhalation solution, fda-approved final product, non-compounded, administered through dme, unit dose, 1 mg

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1407892250
Diagnostic Radiology
54
1629092838
Diagnostic Radiology
38
1508841685
Diagnostic Radiology
21
1841274172
Diagnostic Radiology
18
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Lee has made to other doctors

Publications

Unique features of a global human ectoparasite identified through sequencing of the bed bug genome. - Nature communications
The bed bug, Cimex lectularius, has re-established itself as a ubiquitous human ectoparasite throughout much of the world during the past two decades. This global resurgence is likely linked to increased international travel and commerce in addition to widespread insecticide resistance. Analyses of the C. lectularius sequenced genome (650 Mb) and 14,220 predicted protein-coding genes provide a comprehensive representation of genes that are linked to traumatic insemination, a reduced chemosensory repertoire of genes related to obligate hematophagy, host-symbiont interactions, and several mechanisms of insecticide resistance. In addition, we document the presence of multiple putative lateral gene transfer events. Genome sequencing and annotation establish a solid foundation for future research on mechanisms of insecticide resistance, human-bed bug and symbiont-bed bug associations, and unique features of bed bug biology that contribute to the unprecedented success of C. lectularius as a human ectoparasite.
Ampullary Cancers Harbor ELF3 Tumor Suppressor Gene Mutations and Exhibit Frequent WNT Dysregulation. - Cell reports
The ampulla of Vater is a complex cellular environment from which adenocarcinomas arise to form a group of histopathologically heterogenous tumors. To evaluate the molecular features of these tumors, 98 ampullary adenocarcinomas were evaluated and compared to 44 distal bile duct and 18 duodenal adenocarcinomas. Genomic analyses revealed mutations in the WNT signaling pathway among half of the patients and in all three adenocarcinomas irrespective of their origin and histological morphology. These tumors were characterized by a high frequency of inactivating mutations of ELF3, a high rate of microsatellite instability, and common focal deletions and amplifications, suggesting common attributes in the molecular pathogenesis are at play in these tumors. The high frequency of WNT pathway activating mutation, coupled with small-molecule inhibitors of β-catenin in clinical trials, suggests future treatment decisions for these patients may be guided by genomic analysis.Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Collaborative Modeling of the Benefits and Harms Associated With Different U.S. Breast Cancer Screening Strategies. - Annals of internal medicine
Controversy persists about optimal mammography screening strategies.To evaluate screening outcomes, taking into account advances in mammography and treatment of breast cancer.Collaboration of 6 simulation models using national data on incidence, digital mammography performance, treatment effects, and other-cause mortality.United States.Average-risk U.S. female population and subgroups with varying risk, breast density, or comorbidity.Eight strategies differing by age at which screening starts (40, 45, or 50 years) and screening interval (annual, biennial, and hybrid [annual for women in their 40s and biennial thereafter]). All strategies assumed 100% adherence and stopped at age 74 years.Benefits (breast cancer-specific mortality reduction, breast cancer deaths averted, life-years, and quality-adjusted life-years); number of mammograms used; harms (false-positive results, benign biopsies, and overdiagnosis); and ratios of harms (or use) and benefits (efficiency) per 1000 screens.Biennial strategies were consistently the most efficient for average-risk women. Biennial screening from age 50 to 74 years avoided a median of 7 breast cancer deaths versus no screening; annual screening from age 40 to 74 years avoided an additional 3 deaths, but yielded 1988 more false-positive results and 11 more overdiagnoses per 1000 women screened. Annual screening from age 50 to 74 years was inefficient (similar benefits, but more harms than other strategies). For groups with a 2- to 4-fold increased risk, annual screening from age 40 years had similar harms and benefits as screening average-risk women biennially from 50 to 74 years. For groups with moderate or severe comorbidity, screening could stop at age 66 to 68 years.Other imaging technologies, polygenic risk, and nonadherence were not considered.Biennial screening for breast cancer is efficient for average-risk populations. Decisions about starting ages and intervals will depend on population characteristics and the decision makers' weight given to the harms and benefits of screening.National Institutes of Health.
Calibration and Optimization of p53, WT1, and Napsin A Immunohistochemistry Ancillary Tests for Histotyping of Ovarian Carcinoma: Canadian Immunohistochemistry Quality Control (CIQC) Experience. - International journal of gynecological pathology : official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Pathologists
The Canadian Immunohistochemistry Quality Control provides proficiency testing for immunohistochemistry in Canadian laboratories. Canadian Immunohistochemistry Quality Control Run 42 assessed WT1, Napsin A, and p53; commonly used markers for histotyping ovarian carcinomas. A 42-core tissue microarray, which included the 5 major histotypes of ovarian carcinomas with a subset having known TP53 mutational status, was used for this Canadian Immunohistochemistry Quality Control challenge. Participants included 43 laboratories for p53, 29 for WT1, and 26 for Napsin A. p53 was scored as aberrant if the staining was strong and diffuse or absent. Napsin A and WT1 were scored positive if any tumor cells stained. The reference p53 expression pattern was inferred by TP53 mutation type when available. For WT1, Napsin A, and cases lacking mutational data, the reference staining pattern was based on the majority staining result. The error rate for p53 was 8.8%. Most errors (84%) were due to weak staining. The sensitivity and specificity of aberrant p53 expression for an underlying TP53 mutation was 91.6% and 87.9%, respectively. The error rate for WT1 was 0.76% with all errors occurring in laboratories using the 6F-h2 clone. The average errors for laboratories using 6F-h2 were 2.4 compared with 0 for WT-49. The error rate for Napsin A was 4%. The average errors for laboratories using polyclonal Napsin A were 3 compared with 1.1 for monoclonal Napsin A. Weak p53 staining increases interpretative errors, primarily due to absence of staining in tumors with wild-type TP53. p53 immunohistochemistry correlates strongly with TP53 mutational status. Polyclonal Napsin A and 6F-h2 may lack specificity in comparison to monoclonal Napsin A and WT-49.
Hemichordate genomes and deuterostome origins. - Nature
Acorn worms, also known as enteropneust (literally, 'gut-breathing') hemichordates, are marine invertebrates that share features with echinoderms and chordates. Together, these three phyla comprise the deuterostomes. Here we report the draft genome sequences of two acorn worms, Saccoglossus kowalevskii and Ptychodera flava. By comparing them with diverse bilaterian genomes, we identify shared traits that were probably inherited from the last common deuterostome ancestor, and then explore evolutionary trajectories leading from this ancestor to hemichordates, echinoderms and chordates. The hemichordate genomes exhibit extensive conserved synteny with amphioxus and other bilaterians, and deeply conserved non-coding sequences that are candidates for conserved gene-regulatory elements. Notably, hemichordates possess a deuterostome-specific genomic cluster of four ordered transcription factor genes, the expression of which is associated with the development of pharyngeal 'gill' slits, the foremost morphological innovation of early deuterostomes, and is probably central to their filter-feeding lifestyle. Comparative analysis reveals numerous deuterostome-specific gene novelties, including genes found in deuterostomes and marine microbes, but not other animals. The putative functions of these genes can be linked to physiological, metabolic and developmental specializations of the filter-feeding ancestor.
Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Trial of Yeast-Derived Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Versus Peptide Vaccination Versus GM-CSF Plus Peptide Vaccination Versus Placebo in Patients With No Evidence of Disease After Compl - Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and peptide vaccination (PV) on relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with resected high-risk melanoma.Patients with completely resected stage IV or high-risk stage III melanoma were grouped by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) -A2 status. HLA-A2-positive patients were randomly assigned to receive GM-CSF, PV, both, or placebo; HLA-A2-negative patients, GM-CSF or placebo. Treatment lasted for 1 year or until recurrence. Efficacy analyses were conducted in the intent-to-treat population.A total of 815 patients were enrolled. There were no significant improvements in OS (stratified log-rank P = .528; hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% repeated CI, 0.77 to 1.15) or RFS (P = .131; hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.04) in the patients assigned to GM-CSF (n = 408) versus those assigned to placebo (n = 407). The median OS times with GM-CSF versus placebo treatments were 69.6 months (95% CI, 53.4 to 83.5 months) versus 59.3 months (95% CI, 44.4 to 77.3 months); the 5-year OS probability rates were 52.3% (95% CI, 47.3% to 57.1%) versus 49.4% (95% CI, 44.3% to 54.3%), respectively. The median RFS times with GM-CSF versus placebo were 11.4 months (95% CI, 9.4 to 14.8 months) versus 8.8 months (95% CI, 7.5 to 11.2 months); the 5-year RFS probability rates were 31.2% (95% CI, 26.7% to 35.9%) versus 27.0% (95% CI, 22.7% to 31.5%), respectively. Exploratory analyses showed a trend toward improved OS in GM-CSF-treated patients with resected visceral metastases. When survival in HLA-A2-positive patients who received PV versus placebo was compared, RFS and OS were not significantly different. Treatment-related grade 3 or greater adverse events were similar between GM-CSF and placebo groups.Neither adjuvant GM-CSF nor PV significantly improved RFS or OS in patients with high-risk resected melanoma. Exploratory analyses suggest that GM-CSF may be beneficial in patients with resected visceral metastases; this observation requires prospective validation.© 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.
Copy Number Changes Are Associated with Response to Treatment with Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, and Sorafenib in Melanoma. - Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Copy number alterations have been shown to be involved in melanoma pathogenesis. The randomized phase III clinical trial E2603: carboplatin, paclitaxel, ± sorafenib (CP vs. CPS) offers a large collection of tumor samples to evaluate association of somatic mutations, genomic alterations, and clinical outcomes, prior to current FDA-approved therapies.Copy number and mutational analysis on 119 pretreatment samples was performed.CPS therapy was associated with improved progression-free survival (PFS) compared with CP in patients with tumors with RAF1 (cRAF) gene copy gains (HR, 0.372; P = 0.025) or CCND1 gene copy gains (HR, 0.45; P = 0.035). CPS therapy was associated with improved overall survival (OS) compared with CP in patients with tumors with KRAS gene copy gains (HR, 0.25; P = 0.035). BRAF gene copy gain and MET amplification were more common in samples with V600K versus V600E mutations (P < 0.001), which was validated in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset.We observed improved treatment response with CPS in patients with melanoma whose tumors have RAF1 (cRAF), KRAS, or CCND1 amplification, all of which can be attributed to sorafenib targeting CRAF. These genomic alterations should be incorporated in future studies for evaluation as biomarkers. Clin Cancer Res; 22(2); 374-82. ©2015 AACR.©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
Patient Perspectives on the Learning Health System: The Importance of Trust and Shared Decision Making. - The American journal of bioethics : AJOB
We conducted focus groups to assess patient attitudes toward research on medical practices in the context of usual care. We found that patients focus on the implications of this research for their relationship with and trust in their physicians. Patients view research on medical practices as separate from usual care, demanding dissemination of information and in most cases, individual consent. Patients expect information about this research to come through their physician, whom they rely on to identify and filter associated risks. In general, patients support this research, but worry that participation in research involving randomization may undermine individualized care that acknowledges their unique medical histories. These findings suggest the need for public education on variation in practice among physicians and the need for a collaborative approach to the governance of research on medical practices that addresses core values of trust, transparency, and partnership.
Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines Predict Relapse-Free Survival after One Month of Interferon-α but Not Observation in Intermediate Risk Melanoma Patients. - PloS one
E1697 was a phase III trial of adjuvant interferon (IFN)-α2b for one month (Arm B) versus observation (Arm A) in patients with resected melanoma at intermediate risk. We evaluated the levels of candidate serum cytokines, the HLA genotype, polymorphisms of CTLA4 and FOXP3 genes and the development of autoantibodies for their association with relapse free survival (RFS) in Arm A and Arm B among 268 patients with banked biospecimens.ELISA was used to test 5 autoantibodies. Luminex/One Lambda LABTypeRSSO was used for HLA Genotyping. Selected CTLA4 and FOXP3 Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and microsatellites were tested for by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sixteen serum cytokines were tested at baseline and one month by Luminex xMAP multiplex technology. Cox Proportional Hazards model was applied and the Wald test was used to test the marginal association of each individual marker and RFS. We used the Lasso approach to select the markers to be included in a multi-marker Cox Proportional Hazards model. The ability of the resulting models to predict one year RFS was evaluated by the time-dependent ROC curve. The leave-one-out method of cross validation (LOOCV) was used to avoid over-fitting of the data.In the multi-marker modeling analysis conducted in Arm B, one month serum IL2Rα, IL-12p40 and IFNα levels predicted one year RFS with LOOCV AUC = 82%. Among the three markers selected, IL2Rα and IFNα were the most stable (selected in all the cross validation cycles). The risk score (linear combination of the 3 markers) separated the RFS curves of low and high risk groups well (p = 0.05). This model did not hold for Arm A, indicating a differential marker profile in Arm B linked to the intervention (adjuvant therapy).Early on-treatment proinflammatory serum markers (IL2Rα, IL-12p40, IFNα) significantly predict RFS in our cohort of patients treated with adjuvant IFN-α2b and warrant further study.
Lucilia cuprina genome unlocks parasitic fly biology to underpin future interventions. - Nature communications
Lucilia cuprina is a parasitic fly of major economic importance worldwide. Larvae of this fly invade their animal host, feed on tissues and excretions and progressively cause severe skin disease (myiasis). Here we report the sequence and annotation of the 458-megabase draft genome of Lucilia cuprina. Analyses of this genome and the 14,544 predicted protein-encoding genes provide unique insights into the fly's molecular biology, interactions with the host animal and insecticide resistance. These insights have broad implications for designing new methods for the prevention and control of myiasis.

Map & Directions

1 Hatfield Ln Goshen, NY 10924
View Directions In Google Maps

Nearby Doctors

1 Hatfield Ln
Goshen, NY 10924
845 945-5128
7 Coates Dr Suite 4A
Goshen, NY 10924
845 946-6125
2 Fletcher St
Goshen, NY 10924
845 948-8806
36 Glen Dr
Goshen, NY 10924
845 949-9607
30 Hatfield Ln Suite 208
Goshen, NY 10924
845 940-0994
2 Fletcher St
Goshen, NY 10924
845 948-8806
888 Pulaski Highway
Goshen, NY 10924
845 512-2298
110 Wells Farm Rd
Goshen, NY 10924
845 917-7553
1 Hatfield Ln Suite 3
Goshen, NY 10924
845 945-5128
2527 Route 17M
Goshen, NY 10924
845 944-4402