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Dr. Gerhard  Fuchs  Md image

Dr. Gerhard Fuchs Md

8700 Beverly Blvd.
Los Angeles CA 90048
310 671-1884
Medical School: Other - 1979
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: A45861
NPI: 1366426363
Taxonomy Codes:
174400000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Gerhard Fuchs is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:50547 Description:Laparo removal donor kidney Average Price:$5,056.29 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1,659.31
HCPCS Code:52353 Description:Cystouretero w/lithotripsy Average Price:$1,386.67 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$407.38
HCPCS Code:52332 Description:Cystoscopy and treatment Average Price:$495.43 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$87.58
HCPCS Code:52310 Description:Cystoscopy and treatment Average Price:$492.72 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$154.54
HCPCS Code:52000 Description:Cystoscopy Average Price:$415.20 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$133.94
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$237.65 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$78.27
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$158.23 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$52.23
HCPCS Code:99202 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$156.56 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$51.61
HCPCS Code:76770 Description:Us exam abdo back wall comp Average Price:$119.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$35.99
HCPCS Code:76775 Description:Us exam abdo back wall lim Average Price:$91.84 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$29.75
HCPCS Code:99212 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$80.76 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$26.44
HCPCS Code:51798 Description:Us urine capacity measure Average Price:$70.55 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$22.21
HCPCS Code:74420 Description:Contrst x-ray urinary tract Average Price:$58.18 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$18.85
HCPCS Code:51736 Description:Urine flow measurement Average Price:$38.27 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$10.53

HCPCS Code Definitions

52332
Cystourethroscopy, with insertion of indwelling ureteral stent (eg, Gibbons or double-J type)
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99212
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused history; A problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are self limited or minor. Typically, 10 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
52310
Cystourethroscopy, with removal of foreign body, calculus, or ureteral stent from urethra or bladder (separate procedure); simple
52000
Cystourethroscopy (separate procedure)
50547
Laparoscopy, surgical; donor nephrectomy (including cold preservation), from living donor
51736
Simple uroflowmetry (UFR) (eg, stop-watch flow rate, mechanical uroflowmeter)
51798
Measurement of post-voiding residual urine and/or bladder capacity by ultrasound, non-imaging
99202
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 20 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
76770
Ultrasound, retroperitoneal (eg, renal, aorta, nodes), real time with image documentation; complete
74420
Urography, retrograde, with or without KUB
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
52353
Cystourethroscopy, with ureteroscopy and/or pyeloscopy; with lithotripsy (ureteral catheterization is included)
76775
Ultrasound, retroperitoneal (eg, renal, aorta, nodes), real time with image documentation; limited

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1669432167
Nephrology
6,308
1669496832
Neurology
3,669
1679585715
Nephrology
945
1649303603
Diagnostic Radiology
484
1891792693
Urology
462
1720008964
Vascular Surgery
439
1215924105
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
369
1952438392
Diagnostic Radiology
289
1679588180
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
267
1598700080
Diagnostic Radiology
257
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Fuchs has made to other doctors

Publications

Trends in Body-Mass Index After Donor Nephrectomy. - Journal of endourology / Endourological Society
Abstract The link between obesity and diabetes, hypertension, and eventual kidney dysfunction is well recognized. To evaluate trends in the body-mass index (BMI) of donor nephrectomy patients, the BMI was evaluated in 532 donors over 11 years from 2002 to 2012. Measurements were made preoperatively, at 1 year, and at the present time. The follow-up range varied from 12 months to 11 years dependent on the date of donation. Of the 532 patients queried, 100 patients had long-term results. At 1 year, there was an overall decrease in BMI, however, at anytime after the first year, postoperative BMI trended upward, with more than half of the overweight patients (BMI 25-30), at the time of donation, dipping into the obese range (BMI >30). Given these results and recognizing the attendant risks-especially with the background of a single kidney-we have initiated further lifestyle and nutrition counseling at our center and are considering a more stringent preoperative weight control policy.
Management of stones associated with intrarenal stenosis: infundibular stenosis and caliceal diverticulum. - Journal of endourology / Endourological Society
To review our experience with retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) for management of conditions associated with intrarenal stricture and present a treatment algorithm based on the series.RIRS was offered to all patients with symptomatic intrarenal stenosis regardless of location if stone burden was 2 cm or less. With a combined endourology and lithotripsy table, patients with stones between 2 and 3 cm were also offered RIRS using a combined approach of RIRS and shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). A total of 108 patients with symptomatic stones and caliceal diverticulum or infundibular stenosis were included in the data analysis. A standard technique was used in all cases. Failures or patients not suitable for RIRS were treated with either percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) or laparoscopic surgery.Successful identification and dilation/incision of the stenotic opening was accomplished in 94% of cases. Seventy-five percent of stones were managed with basketing and/or holmium laser ablation. In these patients, 90% were stone free (<2 mm stone fragments). For stones between 2 and 3 cm, the use of holmium laser in combination with SWL provided stone-free rates of 75%. Five percent of patients needed PCNL because of larger stone burden and posterior location.With the appropriate equipment, RIRS provides a valid treatment option for patients with intrarenal strictures. While upper pole and midrenal lesions are ideal, lower pole segments may be approached as well. A treatment algorithm based on the results provides a simplified approach for the minimally invasive management of intrarenal stenosis.
Improving flexible ureterorenoscope durability up to 100 procedures. - Journal of endourology / Endourological Society
Controversy exists in the literature regarding flexible ureterorenoscopy (F-URS) durability, with a variable expected number of uses from a new F-URS. In this study, a tertiary center experience with the use of two consecutive F-URS is reported and suggestions as to how to improve durability further are made.All F-URS performed in the same tertiary care center between July 2009 and February 2011, with two new instruments Flex-X, were reviewed retrospectively. All renal pathology were included. Ureteral cases were excluded. A 9.5F semirigid ureteroscope was always used at the start for a ureteral optical predilation and to explore the upper urinary tract for possible lithotripsy/laser ablation/biopsy. The F-URS was introduced sequentially to explore the remaining calices. Data pertaining to the procedure were collected. The method of sterilization was complete immersion with Cidex®.The instruments were substituted after 113 and 102 procedures, respectively. The first F-URS was used for a total operative time of 79 hours and 10 minutes while the second one was used for 71 hours and 25 minutes (mean 75 hours and 15 min). Procedure duration was 15 to 175 minutes (mean 58 min). The flexible instruments were used for a mean of 42 minutes per procedure (range 13-153 min). The indications for F-URS were therapeutic in 75.4% and diagnostic in 22.8% of the cases. For lower pole calculi, the stone was relocated in 65.2% and managed with the nonflexed flexible instrument 90% of the time. The most common causes of damage of F-URS were: Deflection mechanism impairment, inner sheath damage, and fiberoptic bundle breaks.Increased durability of F-URS was from a variety of factors, a key element of which was the method of sterilization, while routine use of the semirigid instrument initially further contributed significantly to increase the number of F-URS procedures, saving overall costs.
First collaborative experience with thulium laser ablation of localized upper urinary tract urothelial tumors using retrograde intra-renal surgery. - Archivio italiano di urologia, andrologia : organo ufficiale [di] Società italiana di ecografia urologica e nefrologica / Associazione ricerche in urologia
Thulium laser ablation (TLA) outcomes with blinded performance evaluation after retrograde intra-renal surgical (RIRS) treatment of upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinomas (UUT-TCC).A UUT-TCC patient cohort undergoing RIRS-TLA by an international endoscopic surgical collaboration in a European center (April 2005-July 2009), underwent outcomes evaluation. All 4 surgeons were blinded and independently scored both TLA and Holmium:YAG laser ablation performance aspects annually using a Likert scoring system (0-10).All patients (n = 59, median age 66 years, 9 with solitary kidney) had complete UUT inspection. Presenting lesion(s) were intra-renal (n = 30, 51%), ureteral (n = 13, 22%), and combined (n = 16, 27%). Single-stage TLA sufficed in 81.4% (tumors < 1.5 cm). Significant recurrence free survival differences occurred according to primary tumor size >/< 1.5 cm and multi-focality, but location made no difference. Median Likert scores were i) fiber-tip stability --5.5/8.75, p = 0.016; ii) reduced bleeding--5/8.5, p = 0.004; iii)fiber-tip precision--5.5/8.5, p = 0.003; iv) mucosal perforation reduction--3.5/7.5, p = 0.001; v) ablation efficiency tumors < 1.5 cm--6/9, p = 0.017; tumors > 1.5 cm--6.75/6.75, p = 1, and vi) overall efficiency--6/7.5, p = 0.09, for Holmium:YAG and TLA, respectively.The Thulium laser delivered non-inferior recurrence free survival to RIRS-UUT-TCC Holmium:YAG laser ablation, but better median parameter performance scores in fiber-tip stability, precision, reduced bleeding and mucosal perforation reduction in expert ratings. Despite improved photothermal coagulation, and endo-visualization for tumors < 1.5 cm, both ablation and overall efficiency remained challenging for larger tumors with both existing laser technologies.
A comparison of running suture versus figure-8 sutures as the initial step in achieving hemostasis during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. - Journal of endourology / Endourological Society
During laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, the importance of the initial suture placed under warm ischemic conditions cannot be underestimated. Inadequate hemostasis may lead to further surgical complications. Our goal was to determine which method of suture ligation (running vs figure-8 interrupted) provides better initial hemostasis when performing partial nephrectomy in an ex-vivo porcine model.Deep partial nephrectomy defects were cut in the lateral aspect of six porcine kidneys. The renal artery was cannulated, and the kidneys were perfused from a water reservoir. The level (cm H(2)O) at which parenchymal leakage occurred was measured and recorded in three situations: No parenchymal suture; running suture along the base of the defect; and interrupted figure-8 sutures placed in parallel along the base of the defect.Six kidneys were studied. Using interrupted figure-8 sutures, the mean leak pressure was 56.7 cm H(2)O (over baseline). Using a running suture, the mean leak pressure was 147.5 cm H(2)O (over baseline). Mean values were compared using two-tailed t test and found to be statistically significant (P = 0.05).In an ex-vivo porcine kidney model, use of a running suture along the base of a renal tumor defect (simulating that which is seen during partial nephrectomy) appears to allow for better initial hemostatic control, as compared with interrupted figure-8 sutures placed in parallel.
Percutaneous biopsy of renal cell carcinoma underestimates nuclear grade. - Urology
To assess the accuracy of renal biopsy for predicting the final nuclear grade and histologic subtype. Small renal masses can be safely observed in select patients who are poor surgical candidates. Renal biopsy may help identify patients who are candidates for observation.A total of 81 patients (29 female, 52 male) underwent percutaneous biopsy of their renal mass with ultrasound or computed tomography guidance. Percutaneous 18-gauge biopsy cores were obtained, and all patients subsequently underwent radical nephrectomy or partial nephrectomy. Preoperative biopsy results were compared with postoperative specimens.The mean tumor size was 5.3 cm (range, 1-17). Overall, biopsy correctly identified 71 of 81 (88%) histologic subtypes. The preoperative biopsy correctly identified 62 of 64 (97%) clear cell renal carcinomas, 9 of 10 (90%) papillary carcinomas, 0 of 3 (0%) chromophobe carcinomas, and 1 of 2 (50%) oncocytomas. The final pathologies for 2 nondiagnostic biopsies were clear cell renal carcinoma and inflammatory pseudotumor. For 67 tumors, the pathologists assigned a nuclear grade for both the biopsy and the final specimen. The biopsy correctly identified 29 of 67 (43%) final nuclear grades. The biopsy underestimated the nuclear grade in 37 of 67 (55%) cases. In 7 of 67 (10%) cases, the biopsy nuclear grade increased by 2 when compared with the final grade. The biopsy rarely overestimated the nuclear grade; 1 case (1%) that was assigned a grade 2 on biopsy was assigned a grade 1 after nephrectomy.Core biopsies for renal masses underestimate nuclear grade in most cases; however, histologic subtype is more reliably assessed, particularly for clear cell renal tumors.Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Urolithiasis in adults with congenital megaureter. - Canadian Urological Association journal = Journal de l'Association des urologues du Canada
The primary presentation of congenital megaureter in adults is rare. Development of urolithiasis may lead to this unusual underlying diagnosis. Urinary tract stones can form either within the dilated ureteral segment or in a part of the upper urinary tract proximal to the abnormal ureteral segment. We report two cases of nephrolithiasis that occurred in adults found to have segmental megaureter. The first case is that of a 58-year-old man who presented with left lower quadrant pain. Computed tomography scan revealed a 2-cm stone in the distal left ureter within an area of isolated segmental distal ureteral dilation. The second case is a 48-year-old man who developed recurrent renal urolithiasis associated with isolated distal megaureter.Although a rare condition in adults, congenital megaureter may present when kidney stones develop as a result of the ureteral abnormality. Typically, stones will develop within the dilated segment of ureter. Atypically, stones may develop away from the site of the underlying abnormality. Congenital megaureter is a diagnosis that urologists and radiologists need to consider in the setting of isolated distal ureteral dilation, as the diagnosis of adult megaureter may require more involved surgical measures to prevent recurrence of adverse symptoms.
Enlargement of accessory spleen after splenectomy can mimic a solitary adrenal tumor. - Urology
We report on a 72-year-old woman who had previously undergone splenectomy and subsequently presented with an incidental 5-cm adrenal mass. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed, and the mass was identified to be an accessory spleen. Remaining accessory splenic tissue may undergo compensatory hypertrophy after splenectomy. When a biochemically inactive, well-marginated ovoid adrenal mass is identified in a postsplenectomy patient, consideration should be given to the presence of accessory spleen. In such cases, radionuclide imaging with technetium sulfur colloid may provide information that would confirm the presence of accessory normal tissue and would therefore support observation rather than surgical resection.2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Adrenal metastasis with inferior vena cava tumor thrombus through adrenal vein. - Urology
A 69-year-old woman was evaluated for anemia. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a large right renal mass. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 12-cm renal mass and a separate 7.5-cm ipsilateral adrenal mass, with a tumor thrombus extending through the adrenal vein and into the inferior vena cava. Right radical nephrectomy/adrenalectomy with caval tumor thrombectomy was performed, and both lesions were diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma. We report on an unusual case of a large renal cell carcinoma with metastasis to the adrenal gland and vena caval extension by way of the adrenal venous system, without renal vein thrombus.
Delayed hematuria secondary to bleeding papilla--potential complication of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. - Urology
The complications of partial nephrectomy include hemorrhage, urinary leak, infection, formation of urinary fistula, and the development of renal insufficiency. We report a unique case of a patient who was found to have necrotic-appearing, bleeding, renal papillae after undergoing laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. A 66-year-old man was diagnosed with a left-sided, solid, enhancing, 2.5-cm, exophytic renal mass. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy was performed, and the warm ischemia time was 31 minutes. He recovered uneventfully from surgery, but he started having episodes of gross hematuria approximately 5 months later. Computed tomography scan showed changes consistent with previous partial nephrectomy but no other abnormality. Ureterorenoscopy allowed us to identify several necrotic-appearing papillae in the same kidney that had undergone laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. A papilla in the lower pole was actively bleeding, and it was successfully obliterated using neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser technology. Papillary necrosis can be a rare complication of laparoscopic or open partial nephrectomy. Additional study and close follow-up of patients who undergo partial nephrectomy is warranted.

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8700 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048
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