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Dr. Ario  Barzin  Md, image

Dr. Ario Barzin Md,

3200 Kearney Street
Fremont CA 94538
510 901-1222
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: A100978
NPI: 1356537633
Taxonomy Codes:
208200000X

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Publications

Breast reconstruction national trends and healthcare implications. - The breast journal
Breast reconstruction improves quality-of-life of breast cancer patients. Different reconstructive options exist, yet commentary in the plastic surgery literature suggests that financial constraints are limiting access to autologous reconstruction (AR). This study follows national trends in breast reconstruction and identifies factors associated with reconstructive choices. Data were obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 1998 to 2008. Patients were categorized as having either implant or ARs. Bivariate and multivariate regression analysis identified variables associated with receiving implants versus AR. Physician fee schedules were analyzed using national average Medicare physician reimbursement rates. From 1998 to 2008, 324,134 breast reconstructions were performed. Reconstructions increased 4% per year. The proportion of implant reconstructions increased 11% per year, whereasARs decreased 5% per year (p < 0.05). Our model showed that the odds of having implant-based versus AR were significantly associated with age, disease severity, payer type, hospital teaching status, and year of surgery. Year of surgery was the strongest predictor of implant reconstruction; patients receiving breast reconstructive surgery in 2009 were three times more likely to have implant breast reconstructive surgery compared with similar patients in 2002. Medicare reimbursement steadily declined for AR over a similar time frame. From 1998 to 2008, autologous breast reconstruction has significantly declined, parallel to a decrease in physician reimbursement. Our data found no significant change in patient characteristics supporting the lack of choice of AR. Further research is warranted to better understand this shift to implant reconstruction and to ensure future access of these complex reconstructive procedures.© 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Adverse events following digital replantation in the elderly. - The Journal of hand surgery
The decision to proceed with digital replantation in the elderly can be challenging. In addition to success of the replanted part, perioperative morbidity and mortality must be considered. The purpose of this study was to compare adverse events in patients less than 65 years of age compared with those 65 years and older after digital replantation. We hypothesize that there is an increased incidence of mortality and sentinel adverse events in patients aged 65 and older.We obtained data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample over a 10-year period from 1998 to 2007. Replantation was identified using International Classification of Diseases-9 procedure codes for finger and thumb reattachment (84.21 and 84.22). Adverse events were identified using Patient Safety Indicators (PSI) to identify adverse events occurring during hospitalization. We used the Charlson index to study medical comorbidities and bivariate statistics.During the study period 15,413 finger and thumb replantations were performed in the United States, with 616 performed on patients age 65 and older. The overall in-hospital mortality was 0.04% with no statistical difference when factoring age. For the entire group, the percentage of PSI was 0.6%, the most common being postoperative deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolus. Overall, there was no difference in PSI between the 2 groups. The older group had a higher rate of transfusion, 4% versus 8% (p < .05) and were more likely to have a nonroutine disposition (ie, nursing home) (p < .001). We found no correlation between the Charlson index and PSI.This study found no difference in sentinel perioperative complications or mortality when comparing replantation patients under 65 years of age and those age 65 and older. Age alone should not be an absolute contraindication to finger replantation. Instead, the patient's functional demands, type of injury, general state of health, and rehabilitative potential should drive the decision of whether to proceed with replantation.Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Supercharged jejunum flap for total esophageal reconstruction: single-surgeon 3-year experience and outcomes analysis. - Plastic and reconstructive surgery
Esophageal reconstruction after total esophagectomy remains a formidable task irrespective of the conduit chosen. Historically, the gastric pull-up and colonic interposition have served as primary choices for such defects. However, where the stomach and colon are unavailable or unsuitable, the jejunum serves as a reliable alternative for the reconstruction of total esophageal defects.The authors performed an outcomes analysis of a single surgeon's surgical technique and experience. Patients who received supercharged pedicled jejunum flaps for reconstruction of total esophageal defects over a 3-year period were included in this study. Data were collected prospectively evaluating operative technique, length of hospital stay, operative time, complications, postoperative diet, and quality-of-life outcomes analysis.Five patients underwent supercharged pedicled jejunal flap surgery during this study period. All flaps had complete viability and no microvascular complications. One patient had a radiographic anastomotic leak detected by barium swallow that was reexplored and closed primarily and reinforced with a pectoralis advancement flap with subsequent resolution. All patients are currently tolerating a regular diet and there are no symptoms of reflux or dumping. No conduit strictures or redundancy has been found to date, and there has been no need for reoperation in the long term.The supercharged jejunum flap is a reliable alternative to the gastric pull-up and colonic interposition for total esophageal reconstruction. In our experience, the key maneuver in this technique is a substernal tunnel for the jejunal conduit and exposure of recipient vessels and the esophageal stump by means of a manubriectomy, clavicle resection, partial first rib resection and, occasionally, a second rib resection.
Multiple magnet ingestion as a source of severe gastrointestinal complications requiring surgical intervention. - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine
To raise awareness of the dangers associated with magnet ingestion in children.Case report and review of the literature.Tertiary care children's hospital. Patient Four-year-old boy with minimal physical findings but with a clinical history and imaging suggesting complications from multiple magnet ingestion. Intervention Laparoscopic removal of magnets and repair of magnet-induced enterotomies. Outcome Measure Clinical course.Full recovery after surgical intervention.Ingestion of multiple magnets can cause minimal initial physical examination findings but result in significant complications, including bowel perforation, volvulus, ischemia, and death. Early surgical intervention can prevent significant morbidity and mortality. Clinical vigilance should be exercised in these cases and early surgical consultation with an aggressive surgical approach is recommended. Parents should be warned against the dangers of children's toys that contain these powerful magnets.
Skeletal muscle GLUT1 transporter protein expression and basal leg glucose uptake are reduced in type 2 diabetes. - The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
To investigate the role of skeletal muscle tissue expression of the glucose transporter protein GLUT1 in mediating glucose disposal in the basal (fasting) state, skeletal muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were obtained from lean and obese nondiabetics and type 2 diabetic subjects. Basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptakes were measured. Basal whole body glucose uptake was measured using isotope dilution, and arteriovenous catheterization limb balance was used to determine leg muscle glucose uptake. Basal (noninsulin-stimulated) whole body glucose uptake was higher in the type 2 group compared with the controls (2.26 +/- 0.17 vs. 1.83 +/- 0.15 mg/kg.min; P < 0.05). However, basal leg muscle glucose uptake was reduced in diabetic subjects (1.53 +/- 0.56 vs. 3.89 +/- 0.83 mg/100 ml.min; P < 0.025) despite basal hyperglycemia (230 +/- 13 vs. 94 +/- 2 mg/dl; P < 0.0005). Skeletal muscle GLUT1 protein expression was lower in the type 2 subjects (57 +/- 12 vs. 91 +/- 11 arbitrary units/10 microg protein; P < 0.05), although GLUT1 mRNA levels did not differ. In summary, 1) skeletal muscle tissue GLUT1 protein expression is reduced in type 2 diabetes and could contribute to impaired basal leg glucose uptake; and 2) elevated rates of basal whole body glucose uptake in type 2 diabetes are due to uptake in tissues other than skeletal muscle.

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