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Dr. Scott  Adams  Phd image

Dr. Scott Adams Phd

611 Broadway Rm 629B
New York NY 10012
646 472-2976
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 016647
NPI: 1356537518
Taxonomy Codes:
103TC0700X

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Publications

Urinary Cadmium and Risk of Invasive Breast Cancer in the Women's Health Initiative. - American journal of epidemiology
Cadmium is a widespread heavy metal pollutant that may act as an exogenous estrogenic hormone. Environmental cadmium exposure has been associated with risk of breast cancer in retrospective studies. We prospectively assessed the relationship between cadmium exposure, evaluated by creatinine-normalized urinary cadmium concentration, and invasive breast cancer among 12,701 postmenopausal women aged ≥50 years in a Women's Health Initiative study of bone mineral density. After a median of 13.2 years of follow-up (1993-2010), 508 cases of invasive breast cancer and 1,050 comparison women were identified for a case-cohort analysis. Multivariable Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Risk of breast cancer was not associated with urinary cadmium parameterized either in quartiles (comparing highest quartile with lowest, hazard ratio = 0.80, 95% confidence interval: 0.56, 1.14;Pfor trend = 0.20) or as a log-transformed continuous variable (per 2-fold higher urinary cadmium concentration, hazard ratio = 0.94, 95% confidence interval: 0.86, 1.03). We did not observe an association between urinary cadmium and breast cancer risk in any subgroup examined, including never smokers and women with body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) less than 25. Results were consistent in both estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative tumors. Our results do not support the hypothesis that environmental cadmium exposure is associated with risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
Cancer Stage in American Indians and Alaska Natives Enrolled in Medicaid. - American journal of preventive medicine
Nationally, a greater proportion of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) are diagnosed with advanced-stage cancers compared with non-Hispanic whites. The reasons for observed differences in stage at diagnosis between AI/ANs and non-Hispanic whites remain unclear.Medicaid, Indian Health Service Care Systems, and state cancer registry data for California, Oregon, and Washington (2001-2008, analyzed in 2014-2015) were linked to identify AI/ANs and non-Hispanic whites diagnosed with invasive breast, cervical, colorectal, lung, or prostate cancer. Logistic regression was used to estimate ORs and 95% CIs for distant disease versus local or regional disease, in AI/ANs compared with non-Hispanic white case patients.A similar proportion of AI/AN (31.2%) and non-Hispanic white (35.5%) patients were diagnosed with distant-stage cancer in this population (AOR=1.03, 95% CI=0.88, 1.20). No significant differences in stage at diagnosis were found for any individual cancer site. Among AI/ANs, Indian Health Service Care Systems eligibility was not associated with stage at diagnosis.In contrast to the general population of the U.S., among Medicaid enrollees, AI/AN race is not associated with later stage at diagnosis. Cancer survival disparities associated with AI/AN race that have been observed in the broader population may be driven by factors associated with income and health insurance that are also associated with race, as income and insurance status are more homogenous within the Medicaid population than within the broader population.Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.
Racial Patterns of Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Incidence and Survival in the United States. - Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
To compare incidence and survival of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) subtypes among US racial/ethnic groups.Patients with PTCL (age ≥ 15 years; 2000 to 2012) were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries. Race/ethnicity was categorized as non-Hispanic white, black, Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic white, or American Indian/Alaskan native. Age-standardized annual incidence rates and incidence rate ratios were estimated with 95% CIs, and case-case odds ratios were estimated by race/ethnicity using polytomous regression. Survival was estimated from SEER follow-up data with Cox regression.Thirteen thousand one hundred seven patients with PTCL were identified. Annual PTCL incidence was highest in blacks and lowest in Native Americans. Compared with non-Hispanic whites, blacks had a higher incidence of PTCL not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS), anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and a lower incidence of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL); Asians/Pacific Islanders had a higher incidence of AITL, extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma and NK-cell leukemia (ENKCL), and ATLL and a lower incidence of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma; Hispanics had a higher incidence of AITL and ENKCL; and Native Americans had a lower incidence of PTCL-NOS (all P < .05). The ratio of ENKCL to PCTL-NOS among Native Americans, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic whites was approximately three- to four-fold the same ratio among non-Hispanic whites. Survival varied significantly by race/ethnicity (P < .001), with blacks in particular experiencing shorter survival for most subtypes.Striking variation in incidence, proportions of PTCL subtypes, and survival was observed. Aspects of these PTCL subtype patterns, such as for ENKCL and ATLL, were similar to corresponding global populations. Despite the small population size and limited number of Native American patients, PTCL subtype frequencies in this group were distinct but most similar to Hispanic whites. Survival disparities were evident, especially for blacks compared with non-Hispanic whites.© 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.
The Role of Physician Recommendations and Public Policy in Human Papillomavirus Vaccinations. - Applied health economics and health policy
Immunization rates for human papillomavirus (HPV) infections remain low among teenagers despite strong evidence of the effectiveness of vaccines. Physician recommendations of the vaccine are far from universal. Several states have enacted policies that mandate HPV vaccination or distribute educational materials.To provide policy makers, physicians, and researchers information on the relative importance of physician recommendations and early state-level policies to promote HPV vaccinations among targeted age groups.We first use probit models to determine the strongest correlates of immunization in a nationally representative US sample of teenagers. We then use instrumental variable probit models to determine the direct role that physician recommendations play in vaccination using plausibly exogenous physician encounters that are likely not the result of more health-conscious parents seeking out information on the vaccine.We show that children in the targeted age range who are more likely to encounter physicians for reasons other than seeking out the vaccine, such as through mandatory wellness exams or previous asthma diagnoses, are significantly more likely to get the vaccine. There is no consistent evidence that the state policies we analyze have been effective.Encouraging recommendations by physicians may be the most effective path toward increasing HPV vaccination. State-level mandates and policies are yet to exhibit effectiveness.
Evaluation of Speech Amplification Devices in Parkinson's Disease. - American journal of speech-language pathology / American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of selected speech amplification devices in individuals with hypophonia and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD).This study compared the effectiveness of seven devices (ADDvox, BoomVox, ChatterVox, Oticon Amigo, SoniVox, Spokeman, and Voicette) to unamplified speech for 11 participants with PD during conversation in 65-dB SPL multitalker noise, using experience ratings collected from participant questionnaires and speech performance measures (i.e., speech-to-noise ratio [SNR], speech intensity, and intelligibility) obtained from audio recordings.Compared with unamplified speech, device use increased SNR by 1.07-4.73 dB SPL and speech intensity by 1.1-5.1 dB SPL, and it significantly increased transcribed intelligibility from 13.8% to 58.9%. In addition, the type of device used significantly affected speech performance measures (e.g., BoomVox was significantly higher than most of the other devices for SNR, speech intensity, and intelligibility). However, experience ratings did not always correspond to performance measures.This study found preliminary evidence of improved speech performance with device use for individuals with PD. A tentative hierarchy is suggested for device recommendations. Future research is needed to determine which measures will predict long-term device acceptance in PD.
Racial Patterns of Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Incidence and Survival in the United States. - Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
To compare incidence and survival of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) subtypes among US racial/ethnic groups.Patients with PTCL (age ≥ 15 years; 2000 to 2012) were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries. Race/ethnicity was categorized as non-Hispanic white, black, Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic white, or American Indian/Alaskan native. Age-standardized annual incidence rates and incidence rate ratios were estimated with 95% CIs, and case-case odds ratios were estimated by race/ethnicity using polytomous regression. Survival was estimated from SEER follow-up data with Cox regression.Thirteen thousand one hundred seven patients with PTCL were identified. Annual PTCL incidence was highest in blacks and lowest in Native Americans. Compared with non-Hispanic whites, blacks had a higher incidence of PTCL not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS), anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and a lower incidence of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL); Asians/Pacific Islanders had a higher incidence of AITL, extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma and NK-cell leukemia (ENKCL), and ATLL and a lower incidence of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma; Hispanics had a higher incidence of AITL and ENKCL; and Native Americans had a lower incidence of PTCL-NOS (all P < .05). The ratio of ENKCL to PCTL-NOS among Native Americans, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic whites was approximately three- to four-fold the same ratio among non-Hispanic whites. Survival varied significantly by race/ethnicity (P < .001), with blacks in particular experiencing shorter survival for most subtypes.Striking variation in incidence, proportions of PTCL subtypes, and survival was observed. Aspects of these PTCL subtype patterns, such as for ENKCL and ATLL, were similar to corresponding global populations. Despite the small population size and limited number of Native American patients, PTCL subtype frequencies in this group were distinct but most similar to Hispanic whites. Survival disparities were evident, especially for blacks compared with non-Hispanic whites.© 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.
Urinary heavy metals in Hispanics 40-85 years old in Doña Ana County, New Mexico. - Archives of environmental & occupational health
Exposure to As, Cd, Pb, and U among older Hispanic adults residing in underserved communities in southern New Mexico was investigated. Personal information was obtained by standardized interview from 188 adults aged 40-85 years. Urinary metal concentrations were measured and compared to results from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES). Urinary As and U in study participants significantly (p < .05) exceeded NHANES reference values. Elevated urinary As concentration was significantly associated with older age, Latin American birthplace, clinic site, private-well drinking water, higher self-rated health, and diabetes. Higher urinary Cd was significantly associated with older age, clinic site, female sex, agricultural work, and current cigarette smoking. No personal characteristics were significantly associated with urinary Pb or U. Our results suggest elevated levels of As and U in this population.
Radium-223 dichloride therapy in breast cancer with osseous metastases. - BMJ case reports
Osseous metastases occur frequently in patients with breast cancer. Few options exist for bone targeted therapy for hormone refractory patients with breast cancer with progressive bone metastases. We present a case of breast cancer with osseous metastases but no visceral metastases. The patient had been treated with surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and hormonal therapy, but still had extensive symptomatic osseous metastases. She received radium-223 dichloride, a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for castration resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases. She tolerated the therapy well with no significant adverse effects. She had an excellent response with significant pain relief obviating need for regular analgaesics. Her tumour markers also dropped significantly. Osseous metastases assessed with F-18 fluorodeoxy glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT) and F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF) bone PET/CT) scans at baseline, after two and six cycles, also showed interval improvement in the lesions. Radium-223 dichloride could potentially be a safe and useful therapeutic option in this setting.2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.
Genetic variation in metallothionein and metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 in relation to urinary cadmium, copper, and zinc. - Toxicology and applied pharmacology
Metallothionein (MT) proteins play critical roles in the physiological handling of both essential (Cu and Zn) and toxic (Cd) metals. MT expression is regulated by metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1). Hence, genetic variation in the MT gene family and MTF1 might influence excretion of these metals.321 women were recruited in Seattle, WA and Las Cruces, NM and provided demographic information, urine samples for measurement of metal concentrations by mass spectrometry and creatinine, and blood or saliva for extraction of DNA. Forty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MTF1 gene region and the region of chromosome 16 encoding the MT gene family were selected for genotyping in addition to an ancestry informative marker panel. Linear regression was used to estimate the association of SNPs with urinary Cd, Cu, and Zn, adjusted for age, urinary creatinine, smoking history, study site, and ancestry.Minor alleles of rs28366003 and rs10636 near the MT2A gene were associated with lower urinary Cd, Cu, and Zn. Minor alleles of rs8044719 and rs1599823, near MT1A and MT1B, were associated with lower urinary Cd and Zn, respectively. Minor alleles of rs4653329 in MTF1 were associated with lower urinary Cd.These results suggest that genetic variation in the MT gene region and MTF1 influences urinary Cd, Cu, and Zn excretion.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Peritoneal Equilibration Test and Patient Outcomes. - Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN
Although a peritoneal equilibration test yields data on three parameters (4-hour dialysate/plasma creatinine, 4- to 0-hour dialysate glucose, and 4-hour ultrafiltration volume), all studies have focused on the prognostic value of dialysate/plasma creatinine for patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Because dialysate 4- to 0-hour glucose and ultrafiltration volume may be superior in predicting daily ultrafiltration, the likely mechanism for the association of peritoneal equilibration test results with outcomes, we hypothesized that they are superior to dialysate/plasma creatinine for risk prediction.We examined unadjusted and adjusted associations of three peritoneal equilibration test parameters with all-cause mortality, technique failure, and hospitalization rate in 10,142 patients on peritoneal dialysis treated between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2011 in 764 dialysis facilities operated by a single large dialysis organization in the United States, with a median follow-up period of 15.8 months; 87% were treated with automated peritoneal dialysis.Demographic and clinical parameters explained only 8% of the variability in dialysate/plasma creatinine. There was a linear association between dialysate/plasma creatinine and mortality (adjusted hazards ratio per 0.1 unit higher, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.13) and hospitalization rate (adjusted incidence rate ratio per 0.1 unit higher, 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.06). Dialysate/plasma creatinine and dialysate glucose were highly correlated (r=-0.84) and yielded similar risk prediction. Ultrafiltration volume was inversely related with hospitalization rate but not with all-cause mortality. None of the parameters were associated with technique failure. Adding 4- to 0-hour dialysate glucose, ultrafiltration volume, or both did not result in any improvement in risk prediction with dialysate/plasma creatinine alone.This analysis from a large contemporary cohort treated primarily with automated peritoneal dialysis validates dialysate/plasma creatinine as a robust predictor of outcomes in patients treated with peritoneal dialysis.Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

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