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Dr. Michael  Macken  Md image

Dr. Michael Macken Md

251 E Huron St Northwestern Memorial Hospital
Chicago IL 60611
312 262-2000
Medical School: Other - 1990
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: 36102617
NPI: 1336110550
Taxonomy Codes:
2084N0400X 2084N0600X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Michael Macken is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:95951 Description:EEG monitoring/videorecord Average Price:$1,654.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$336.74
HCPCS Code:95939 Description:C motor evoked upr&lwr limbs Average Price:$700.46 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$122.79
HCPCS Code:95920 Description:Intraop nerve test add-on Average Price:$672.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$113.26
HCPCS Code:95813 Description:Eeg over 1 hour Average Price:$472.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$90.70
HCPCS Code:95861 Description:Muscle test 2 limbs Average Price:$430.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$83.28
HCPCS Code:95819 Description:Eeg awake and asleep Average Price:$298.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$57.50
HCPCS Code:95816 Description:Eeg awake and drowsy Average Price:$298.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$58.21
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$385.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$145.69
HCPCS Code:95938 Description:Somatosensory testing Average Price:$273.36 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$46.57
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$295.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$111.89
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$205.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$75.14

HCPCS Code Definitions

99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
95951
Monitoring for localization of cerebral seizure focus by cable or radio, 16 or more channel telemetry, combined electroencephalographic (EEG) and video recording and interpretation (eg, for presurgical localization), each 24 hours
95861
Needle electromyography; 2 extremities with or without related paraspinal areas
95819
Electroencephalogram (EEG); including recording awake and asleep
95938
Short-latency somatosensory evoked potential study, stimulation of any/all peripheral nerves or skin sites, recording from the central nervous system; in upper and lower limbs
95939
Central motor evoked potential study (transcranial motor stimulation); in upper and lower limbs
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
95813
Electroencephalogram (EEG) extended monitoring; greater than 1 hour
95816
Electroencephalogram (EEG); including recording awake and drowsy

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1528047487
Diagnostic Radiology
458
1124041603
Neurosurgery
392
1649286618
Neurology
358
1427047000
Neurology
302
1205840501
Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation
282
1114933660
Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation
256
1154339729
Internal Medicine
249
1447300298
Neurology
175
1073558276
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
161
1538198833
Internal Medicine
158
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Macken has made to other doctors

Publications

Psychogenic gelastic seizures in a patient with hypothalamic hamartoma. - Epileptic disorders : international epilepsy journal with videotape
Gelastic seizures are classically associated with hypothalamic hamartoma. The most effective treatment for gelastic epilepsy is surgery, although confirming that a hypothalamic hamartoma is an epileptic lesion prior to surgical intervention is challenging. Here, we report the case of a patient with a hypothalamic hamartoma who was diagnosed with psychogenic non-epileptic gelastic seizures using video-EEG monitoring. [Published with video sequences].
Ictal central apnea as a predictor for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. - Epilepsy & behavior : E&B
Epidemiological evidence associating ictal hypoventilation during focal seizures with a heightened risk for subsequent sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is lacking. We describe a patient with temporal lobe epilepsy with two focal seizures recorded in the epilepsy monitoring unit that were associated with central apnea lasting 57 and 58 seconds. During these events, she demonstrated oxygen desaturation down to 68 and 62%. The patient subsequently died at home from autopsy-confirmed SUDEP. The family was not alerted of any seizure activity by the auditory alarm system in her room nor by sleeping in the adjacent room with open doors. This case emphasizes the fact that ictal hypoxia and SUDEP may occur in seizures without noticeable convulsive activity. The report gives credibility to the growing body of literature suggesting that epilepsies affecting the autonomic nervous system may predispose to SUDEP independent of the effects of a secondary generalized convulsion.Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Aphasic status epilepticus: electroclinical correlation. - Epilepsia
Aphasic status epilepticus (ASE) in otherwise awake patients is a rare phenomenon. We present a series of nine consecutive patients with ASE to characterize clinical, electrophysiologic, and imaging findings.Nine patients in ASE were identified between July 2006 and December 2009 at our institution. Each was evaluated by the neurology service and monitored with video-electroencephalography (EEG) for at least 24 h. Thorough, repeated language testing was correlated with EEG findings.All nine patients were right-handed with subacute or chronic left hemispheric lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All patients had mixed aphasia, three presenting with persistent aphasia from onset and six with episodic speech impairment, which became persistent in five of the six. The initial 30-min EEG demonstrated electrographic seizure in only five patients (56%), despite the presence of aphasia during the recording. Left hemispheric periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDS) were seen in two patients, and left hemispheric slowing in two patients. Continuous video-EEG monitoring confirmed electrographic seizure activity in all nine patients. Peak electrographic seizure frequency varied from continuous to once every 2 h and was not associated with fluctuations in the speech deficit. EEG seizures resolved abruptly in three patients and gradually over up to 4 days in six patients. Clinical improvement was delayed in eight of the nine patients, and four patients retained some aphasia at discharge, 2-4 days after EEG seizure resolution.Standard EEG is sensitive for detection of abnormalities in the dominant hemisphere in patients with ASE. However, continuous EEG is necessary to confirm the diagnosis and monitor treatment, since clinical symptoms do not correlate with electrographic seizure activity and do not provide sufficient information to guide treatment decisions.Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.
Mimetic automatisms expressing a negative affect in two patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. - Epilepsy & behavior : E&B
Ictal automatisms of fear or sadness, of which the patient is unaware and which are not preceded by a corresponding emotion, have not been well characterized. Of 557 patients admitted for video/EEG monitoring, 2 (0.36%) were identified who had automatisms of fear and sadness. One patient was found to have a sudden ictal expression of sadness of which he was not aware. The second patient showed a sudden fearful expression, followed by oral automatisms, staring, and amnesia for the event. Both patients had left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. The patient with ictal fear underwent further invasive monitoring and became seizure free after a limited mesial temporal resection. The mesial temporal structures not only mediate emotional experiences, but can also activate stereotyped expressions of fear or sadness without the patient's awareness, arguing for an efferent pathway for expressing negative affects within the mesial temporal lobe.Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Ictal kissing: a release phenomenon in non-dominant temporal lobe epilepsy. - Epileptic disorders : international epilepsy journal with videotape
A variety of ictal automatisms with strong emotional elements have been described. Ictal kissing has not been well characterized and may provide useful clinical information and insight into the mechanisms of stereotyped ictal behaviour.Three of 220 patients (1.4%) admitted for video EEG monitoring between 7/2006 and 6/2009 with ictal kissing were identified. Clinical, neurophysiological and imaging data were reviewed and correlated.All patients were right-handed women with a longstanding history and findings consistent with right temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Multiple habitual events were recorded for each patient, characterized by staring, oral automatisms and amnesia. In addition, partial preservation of responsiveness and speech were seen during seizures in all three patients. The first two patients showed kissing behaviour triggered by interactions during seizure testing. The last patient had six seizures overnight and developed spontaneous kissing behaviour in the ictal and post-ictal period of her later events, associated with hyperorality and sexual disinhibition.Our series supports the findings of two prior cases, of one male and one female, which reported IK behaviour associated with TLE and lateralizing to the non-dominant hemisphere. This behaviour has not been described in simple partial seizures or seen with electrical cortical stimulation suggesting that it represents a release phenomenon rather than activation of distinct symptomatogenic cortex. This is also supported by the fact that ictal kissing can occur within the spectrum of seizure-induced Kluver-Bucy syndrome and may extend into the post-ictal period.

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251 E Huron St Northwestern Memorial Hospital Chicago, IL 60611
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