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Dr. Daniel  Glicklich  Md image

Dr. Daniel Glicklich Md

Mmc - Dept. Of Medicine 111 East 210Th Street
Bronx NY 10467
718 205-5159
Medical School: Albert Einstein College Of Medicine Of Yeshiva University - 1978
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 139525
NPI: 1326123191
Taxonomy Codes:
207RN0300X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Daniel Glicklich is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:50200 Description:Renal biopsy perq Average Price:$1,568.82 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$163.56
HCPCS Code:99205 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$595.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$226.26
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$506.32 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$148.54
HCPCS Code:90935 Description:Hemodialysis one evaluation Average Price:$238.87 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$80.69
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$275.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$118.69
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$228.12 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$77.48
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$180.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$80.56
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$213.86 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$119.09
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$156.48 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$84.87

HCPCS Code Definitions

50200
Renal biopsy; percutaneous, by trocar or needle
90935
Hemodialysis procedure with single evaluation by a physician or other qualified health care professional
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99205
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 60 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1003868365
Diagnostic Radiology
2,570
1477613032
Diagnostic Radiology
1,895
1447257514
Diagnostic Radiology
1,441
1306847603
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
1,307
1043210297
Nephrology
1,244
1245267889
Diagnostic Radiology
1,144
1225075989
Diagnostic Radiology
1,026
1316037989
General Surgery
978
1902885486
Endocrinology
947
1902829401
Endocrinology
873
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Glicklich has made to other doctors

Publications

Drug therapy of apparent treatment-resistant hypertension: focus on mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. - Drugs
Apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (aTRH) is defined as blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mmHg despite three different antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic. aTRH is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events, including stroke, chronic renal failure, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, aortic aneurysm, atrial fibrillation, and sudden death. Preliminary studies of renal nerve ablation as a therapy to control aTRH were encouraging. However, these results were not confirmed by the Symplicity 3 trial. Therefore, attention has refocused on drug therapy. Secondary forms of hypertension and associated conditions such as obesity, sleep apnea, and primary aldosteronism are common in patients with aTRH. The pivotal role of aldosterone in the pathogenesis of aTRH in many cases is well recognized. For patients with aTRH, the Joint National Committee-8, the European Society of Hypertension, and a recent consensus conference recommend that a diuretic, ACE inhibitor, or angiotensin receptor blocker and calcium channel blocker combination be used to maximally tolerated doses before starting a 'fourth-line' drug such as a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist. Although the best fourth-line drug for aTRH has not been extensively investigated, a number of studies summarized here show that an MR antagonist is effective in reducing BP when added to the standard multi-drug regimen.
Cardiovascular risk assessment before and after kidney transplantation. - Cardiology in review
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in dialysis patients and the most common cause of death and allograft loss among kidney transplant recipients. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with an increased incidence and prevalence of a wide range of CVDs including coronary artery disease, stroke, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, sudden cardiac death, pulmonary hypertension, and valvular heart disease. CVD risk factors are very common in patients with ESRD, and most patients have multiple risk factors. Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with ESRD, as a successful transplant improves longevity and quality of life, primarily by decreasing the incidence and severity of CVD. Correction of the uremic state and improved glomerular filtration rate seem to be the major mechanism of this benefit. Transplant candidates should undergo cardiovascular assessment, usually echocardiography and exercise stress testing, and may require formal cardiology consultation. Higher risk candidates, including those aged >50 years, hypertension, diabetes, established coronary artery disease or peripheral vascular disease, left ventricular hypertrophy, and dialysis duration >1 year, should have repeat cardiovascular assessment every 1-2 years. Transplant candidates and recipients should have individualized treatment for CVD and risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. Special consideration should be given for statin therapy, as its use is associated with decreased cardiovascular death in dialysis and transplant patients. Prospective randomized, controlled trials are needed to determine the optimal approach to diagnosis and treat CVD in the transplant candidate and recipient population.
The role of nonpharmacologic device interventions in the management of drug-resistant hypertension. - Current atherosclerosis reports
Resistant systemic hypertension in patients is defined as the inability to control blood pressure despite taking at least three antihypertensive drugs, one of which is a diuretic. Two nonpharmacologic approaches are being evaluated in resistant hypertensive patients. First, the Rheos® Baroreflex Hypertension Therapy system is an implantable device that activates the carotid baroreflex through electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus wall. Sustained and clinically lower blood pressure has been observed in patient clinical trials. The second approach is a catheter-based strategy which denervates the renal afferent and efferent autonomic nervous system. This strategy has also been shown to be effective in drug-resistant patients, and has also been shown to decrease renin production, preserve renal function, improve glucose tolerance, and reduce left ventricular hypertrophy. Both carotid sinus stimulation and renal denervation are now being evaluated in clinical trials for the long-term control of hypertension.
Pretransplant anti-HLA-Cw and anti-HLA-DP antibodies in sensitized patients. - Human immunology
We investigated the prevalence and the strength of anti-HLA-Cw and DP antibodies and clinical outcomes in kidney transplant recipients with isolated donor-specific anti-HLA-Cw antibodies. Patients on the waiting list were screened by Luminex single antigen beads (One Lambda). The strength of antibodies was determined by mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) values of the beads. Of the 1069 patients on the waiting list, 251 (24%) were sensitized with calculated panel reactive antibody >0%. The frequency and the median MFI values of anti-HLA antibodies to Cw (56%, 4955) and DP (35%, 2945) were lower than anti-HLA-A (79%, 10,194), B (86%, 11,235), DR (66%, 7866) and DQ (69%, 8283) (p<0.01). Among three major sensitizing events, only previous transplant was associated with development of all anti-HLA antibodies and history of pregnancy was associated only with development of anti-HLA-A antibodies. Eight patients with donor-specific anti-HLA-Cw antibodies received transplantation. During a median 6 months of follow-up (range 3-24 months), patient and graft survival was 100% without any acute rejection. In summary, the prevalence and the strength of anti-HLA-Cw and HLA-DP were lower compared to anti-HLA-A, B, DR, and DQ antibodies and previous organ transplantation was the main sensitizing event in our cohort of patients.Copyright © 2012 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Lack of effect in desensitization with intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab in highly sensitized patients. - Transplantation
We conducted a prospective cohort study in highly sensitized kidney transplant candidates with a calculated panel reactive antibody (cPRA) greater than 50% and on the deceased-donor waiting list for more than 5 years to investigate the effects of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and rituximab treatment.Desensitization protocol included two doses of IVIG (2 g/kg, max 120 g each dose) and a single dose of rituximab (375 mg/m(2)). Patients were followed up monthly by Luminex single antigen beads. Whole blood gene expression profiles were studied by Affymetrix Human 1.0 ST GeneChips before and after treatment.Forty patients were eligible for desensitization treatment. Thirteen of these patients agreed to participate, and 11 completed the treatment. After a mean follow-up of 334 ± 82 days, two desensitized patients (18%) received a kidney transplant compared with 14 patients (52%) in the nondesensitized group. Comparing with 14 patients who received transplants without any desensitization treatment, desensitized patients showed higher class I (99% vs. 80%) and class II (98% vs. 69%) cPRA levels and more unacceptable antigens (32 vs. 8). Desensitization treatment did not lead to any significant reduction in patients' class I and II cPRA levels and any change in the mean number of unacceptable antigens or their mean fluorescence intensity values. Whole blood gene expression analysis by microarrays demonstrated down-regulation of immunoglobulin and B-cell-associated transcripts after treatment.These results suggested that pretransplant desensitization with IVIG and rituximab was not successful in highly sensitized kidney transplant candidates with cPRA levels higher than 90%.
Effect of risedronate on bone in renal transplant recipients. - Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN
Bisphosphonates may prevent or treat the bone loss promoted by the immunosuppressive regimens used in renal transplantation. Risedronate is a commonly used third-generation amino-bisphosphonate, but little is known about its effects on the bone health of renal transplant recipients. We randomly assigned 42 new living-donor kidney recipients to either 35 mg of risedronate weekly or placebo for 12 months. We obtained bone biopsies at the time of renal transplant and after 12 months of protocol treatment. Treatment with risedronate did not affect bone mineral density (BMD) in the overall cohort. In subgroup analyses, it tended to preserve BMD in female participants but did not significantly affect the BMD of male participants. Risedronate did associate with increased osteoid volume and trabecular thickness in male participants, however. There was no evidence for the development of adynamic bone disease. In summary, further study is needed before the use of prophylactic bisphosphonates to attenuate bone loss can be recommended in renal transplant recipients.
Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor use soon after renal transplantation: a randomized, double-blinded placebo-controlled safety study. - Clinical transplantation
Activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) followed by increased inflammatory cytokines may be important in the pathogenesis of chronic allograft dysfunction. As many renal transplant recipients show chronic changes on biopsy within the first year, early RAS blockade with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) could be beneficial. However, it remains unclear that early ACEI use is safe. We conducted a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to assess the safety of enalapril 5 mg during the early post-transplant period. Subjects took the study medication for six months. Primary endpoints were serum potassium (K) >5.9 mEq/L and 30% increase in baseline creatinine. A total of 53 subjects were randomized, and of them, 27 received the study drug. Twenty-nine subjects, 14 ACEI and 15 controls, completed the six-month protocol without reaching an endpoint. Patients on ACEI had higher K and higher BUN at six months. Serum creatinine, hematocrit, and urinary protein were not different. There was no difference in urinary TGF-β1. Twenty-four subjects reached study endpoints. When the common clinical endpoints of elevated creatinine and hyperkalemia were combined, ACEI group had significantly increased endpoints vs. control (10/13, 77% vs. 5/11, 45%, p < 0.05). We conclude that ACEI use in the early post-transplant period can be safe but patients must be carefully selected and monitored for elevations in serum creatinine and potassium. Whether early ACEI is beneficial in preserving allograft function requires further study.© 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
Successful transplantation of a donor kidney with diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis and crescents--a case report. - Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association
Pre-existing diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (DPGN) in a potential deceased kidney donor has been considered a contraindication for transplantation. We report a case of a patient who underwent a successful deceased donor renal transplantation from a donor with history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) whose baseline biopsy revealed DPGN. Although the histology was relatively benign in the procurement kidney biopsy done by frozen section, the final light microscopy available after transplantation showed diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis, WHO class IV, with 44% crescents. The post-transplant course was complicated by delayed allograft function requiring haemodialysis for the first week. A repeat biopsy performed after 4 months of transplant showed resolution of the proliferative lesions in the glomeruli with disappearance of the crescents. At 5.5 years of follow-up, the patient's creatinine has been stable at 2.0 mg/dL (176.8 μmol/L), but he has persistent proteinuria.
Adenovirus nephritis and obstructive uropathy in a renal transplant recipient: case report and literature review. - NDT plus
We report an unusual case of adenoviral nephritis in a 45-year-old woman who presented with fever, gross haematuria, acute kidney injury and obstructive uropathy 17 months following renal transplantation. Adenoviral nephritis was confirmed with immunohistochemistry. We identified 10 other published cases of adenoviral nephritis proven by immunohistochemistry. Obstructive uropathy has been reported only once before in a renal transplant recipient with adenoviral nephritis. Contrary to other reports, this case series shows that renal function may not always recover to baseline following the acute adenoviral disease. Adenoviral nephritis should be considered in the renal transplant patient with fever, haematuria, acute kidney injury and hydronephrosis in both the early and late post-transplant periods.
Human and murine kidneys show gender- and species-specific gene expression differences in response to injury. - PloS one
The incidence of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) is approximately 50% higher in men than women. In order to understand the molecular basis of this gender disparity, we examined sex specific gene expression patterns in control and diseased, human and murine kidney samples. Using the Affymetrix platform we performed comprehensive gene expression analysis on 42 microdissected human kidney samples (glomeruli and tubules). We identified 67 genes with gender biased expression in healthy human kidneys and 24 transcripts in diseased male and female human kidneys. Similar analysis performed in mice using male and female control and doxorubicin induced nephrotic syndrome kidneys identified significantly larger number of differentially expressed transcripts. The majority of genes showing gender biased expression either in diseased human and murine kidneys were different from those differentially expressed in healthy kidneys. Only 9 sexually dimorphic transcripts were common to healthy human and murine kidneys and five showed differential regulation in both human and murine diseased kidneys. In humans, sex biased genes showed statistical enrichment only to sex chromosomes while in mice they were enriched to sex chromosomes and various autosomes. Thus we present a comprehensive analysis of gender biased genes in the kidney. We show that sexually dimorphic genes in the kidney show species specific regulation. Our results also indicate that male and female kidneys respond differently to injury. These studies could provide the basis for the development of new treatment strategies for men and women with kidney disease.

Map & Directions

Mmc - Dept. Of Medicine 111 East 210Th Street Bronx, NY 10467
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