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Dr. Paul  Kim  Do image

Dr. Paul Kim Do

1011 Reed Ave Suite 300
Wyomissing PA 19610
610 744-4401
Medical School: Kirksville College Of Osteopathic Medicine - 2000
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: OS011219
NPI: 1285853887
Taxonomy Codes:
207RG0100X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Paul Kim is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:45385 Description:Lesion removal colonoscopy Average Price:$1,745.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$282.50
HCPCS Code:45380 Description:Colonoscopy and biopsy Average Price:$1,335.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$204.17
HCPCS Code:45378 Description:Diagnostic colonoscopy Average Price:$1,084.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$180.64
HCPCS Code:G0121 Description:Colon ca scrn not hi rsk ind Average Price:$1,084.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$195.30
HCPCS Code:43239 Description:Upper gi endoscopy biopsy Average Price:$906.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$159.62
HCPCS Code:43235 Description:Uppr gi endoscopy diagnosis Average Price:$831.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$135.82
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$240.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$129.60
HCPCS Code:99221 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$185.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$95.86
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$175.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$100.28
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$140.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$67.71
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$95.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$67.03
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$120.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$99.28

HCPCS Code Definitions

43235
Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, flexible, transoral; diagnostic, including collection of specimen(s) by brushing or washing, when performed (separate procedure)
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
45378
Colonoscopy, flexible, proximal to splenic flexure; diagnostic, with or without collection of specimen(s) by brushing or washing, with or without colon decompression (separate procedure)
43239
Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, flexible, transoral; with biopsy, single or multiple
45385
Colonoscopy, flexible, proximal to splenic flexure; with removal of tumor(s), polyp(s), or other lesion(s) by snare technique
45380
Colonoscopy, flexible, proximal to splenic flexure; with biopsy, single or multiple
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
G0121
Colorectal cancer screening; colonoscopy on individual not meeting criteria for high risk
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99221
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed or comprehensive history; A detailed or comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of low severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1205836228
Diagnostic Radiology
999
1922009570
Diagnostic Radiology
981
1184682023
Family Practice
868
1417936121
Pathology
767
1114005089
Family Practice
719
1427163708
Family Practice
714
1003817651
Diagnostic Radiology
665
1215938261
Diagnostic Radiology
613
1790775153
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
564
1598788689
Internal Medicine
515
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Kim has made to other doctors

Publications

Activation of Protein C and Thrombin Activable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor on Cultured Human Endothelial Cells. - Journal of thrombosis and haemostasis : JTH
When bound to thrombomodulin (TM), thrombin is a potent activator of protein C (PC) and thrombin activable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI). By binding PC and presenting it to the thrombin-TM complex, endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) enhances PC activation. It is unknown whether PC and TAFI compete for the thrombin-TM complex on endothelial cells.To compare PC and TAFI activation on the surface of cultured human endothelial cells in the absence or presence of JRK1535 and/or CTM1009, inhibitory antibodies directed against EPCR and TM, respectively, and to determine whether PC and TAFI compete with each other for activation.PC and TAFI activation on endothelial cells were compared, and the effect of PC on TAFI activation and TAFI on PC activation was determined in the absence or presence of JRK1535 and/or CTM1009.In the absence of antibodies, activation of PC was 4-fold faster than that of TAFI. Blocking EPCR with JRK1535 resulted in a 53-fold decrease in PC activation and no effect on TAFI activation. Blocking TM with CTM1009 inhibited both TAFI and PC activation. Neither TAFI nor PC competed with each other in the absence or presence of JRK1535.PC and TAFI are concurrently activated in a TM-dependent manner and do not compete for the thrombin-TM complex, raising the possibility that they interact with distinct activation complexes. EPCR selectively enhances PC activation so that PC and TAFI activation kinetics become comparable on endothelial cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Return to Sports and Physical Activities After Primary Partial Arthrodesis for Lisfranc Injuries in Young Patients. - Foot & ankle international
Research regarding outcomes in sports and physical activities after primary partial arthrodesis for Lisfranc injuries has been sparse. The purposes of this study were to assess various sports and physical activities in young patients following primary partial arthrodesis for Lisfranc injuries and to compare these with clinical outcomes.Patients who underwent primary partial arthrodesis for a Lisfranc injury were identified by a retrospective registry review. Thirty-eight of 46 eligible patients (83%) responded for follow-up at a mean of 5.2 (range, 1.0 to 9.3) years with a mean age at surgery of 31.8 (range, 16.8 to 50.3) years. Physical activity participation was assessed with a new sports-specific, patient-administered questionnaire. Clinical outcomes were assessed with the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS).Patients participated in 29 different and 155 total physical activities preoperatively, and 27 different and 145 total physical activities postoperatively. Preoperatively, 47.1% were high impact, and postoperatively, 44.8% were high impact. The most common activities were walking, bicycling, running, and weightlifting. Compared to preoperatively, difficulty was the same in 66% and increased in 34% of physical activities. Participation levels were improved in 11%, the same in 64%, and impaired in 25% of physical activities. Patients spent on average 4.2 (range, 0.0 to 19.8) hours per week exercising postoperatively. In regard to return to physical activity, 97% of respondents were satisfied with their operative outcome. Mean postoperative FAOS subscores were significantly worse for patients who had increased physical activity difficulty.Most patients were able to return to their previous physical activities following primary partial arthrodesis for a Lisfranc injury, many of which were high-impact. However, the decreased participation or increase in difficulty of some activities suggests that some patients experienced postoperative limitations in exercise. Future studies could compare sports outcomes between primary partial arthrodesis and open reduction internal fixation for Lisfranc injuries.Level IV, retrospective case series.© The Author(s) 2015.
CXCR-4 Targeted, Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) Emitting Nanoprobes for Enhanced Deep Tissue Imaging and Micrometastatic Cancer Lesion Detection. - Small (Weinheim an der Bergstrasse, Germany)
Realizing the promise of precision medicine in cancer therapy depends on identifying and tracking cancerous growths to maximize treatment options and improve patient outcomes. This goal of early detection remains unfulfilled by current clinical imaging techniques that fail to detect lesions due to their small size and suborgan localization. With proper probes, optical imaging techniques can overcome this by identifying the molecular phenotype of tumors at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. In this study, the first use of nanophotonic short wave infrared technology is proposed to molecularly phenotype small lesions for more sensitive detection. Here, human serum albumin encapsulated rare-earth nanoparticles (ReANCs) with ligands for targeted lesion imaging are designed. AMD3100, an antagonist to CXCR4 (a classic marker of cancer metastasis) is adsorbed onto ReANCs to form functionalized ReANCs (fReANCs). fReANCs are able to preferentially accumulate in receptor positive lesions when injected intraperitoneally in a subcutaneous tumor model. fReANCs can also target subtissue microlesions at a maximum depth of 10.5 mm in a lung metastatic model of breast cancer. Internal lesions identified with fReANCs are 2.25 times smaller than those detected with ReANCs. Thus, an integrated nanoprobe detection platform is presented, which allows target-specific identification of subtissue cancerous lesions.© 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
Comparison of Outcomes for Normal Saline and an Antiseptic Solution for Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy with Instillation. - Plastic and reconstructive surgery
Negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation is an adjunctive treatment that uses periodic instillation of a solution and negative pressure for a wide diversity of wounds. A variety of solutions have been reported, with topical antiseptics as the most frequently chosen option. The objective of this study was to compare the outcomes of normal saline versus an antiseptic solution for negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation for the adjunctive treatment of infected wounds.This was a prospective, randomized, effectiveness study comparing 0.9% normal saline versus 0.1% polyhexanide plus 0.1% betaine for the adjunctive treatment of infected wounds that required hospital admission and operative débridement. One hundred twenty-three patients were eligible, with 100 patients randomized for the intention-to-treat analysis and 83 patients for the per-protocol analysis. The surrogate outcomes measured were number of operative visits, length of hospital stay, time to final surgical procedure, proportion of closed or covered wounds, and proportion of wounds that remained closed or covered at the 30-day follow-up.There were no statistically significant differences in the demographic profiles in the two cohorts except for a larger proportion of male patients (p = 0.004). There was no statistically significant difference in the surrogate outcomes with the exception of the time to final surgical procedure favoring normal saline (p = 0.038).The authors' results suggest that 0.9% normal saline may be as effective as an antiseptic (0.1% polyhexanide plus 0.1% betaine) for negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation for the adjunctive inpatient management of infected wounds.Therapeutic, II.
Cell-Free DNA Modulates Clot Structure and Impairs Fibrinolysis in Sepsis. - Arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology
Sepsis is characterized by systemic activation of inflammation and coagulation in response to infection. In sepsis, activated neutrophils extrude neutrophil extracellular traps composed of cell-free DNA (CFDNA) that not only trap pathogens but also provide a stimulus for clot formation. Although the effect of CFDNA on coagulation has been extensively studied, much less is known about the impact of CFDNA on fibrinolysis. To address this, we (1) investigated the relationship between CFDNA levels and fibrinolytic activity in sepsis and (2) determined the mechanisms by which CFDNA modulates fibrinolysis.Plasma was collected from healthy and septic individuals, and CFDNA was quantified. Clot lysis assays were performed in plasma and purified systems, and lysis times were determined by monitoring absorbance. Clot morphology was assessed using scanning electron microscopy. Clots formed in plasma from septic patients containing >5 µg/mL CFDNA were dense in structure and resistant to fibrinolysis, a phenomenon overcome by deoxyribonuclease addition. These effects were recapitulated in control plasma supplemented with CFDNA. In a purified system, CFDNA delayed fibrinolysis but did not alter tissue-type plasminogen activator-induced plasmin generation. Using surface plasmon resonance, CFDNA bound plasmin with a Kd value of 4.2±0.3 µmol/L, and increasing concentrations of CFDNA impaired plasmin-mediated degradation of fibrin clots via the formation of a nonproductive ternary complex between plasmin, CFDNA, and fibrin.Our studies suggest that the increased levels of CFDNA in sepsis impair fibrinolysis by inhibiting plasmin-mediated fibrin degradation, thereby identifying CFDNA as a potential therapeutic target for sepsis treatment.© 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
Provider and Nonprovider Sources of Mental Health Help in the Military and the Effects of Stigma, Negative Attitudes, and Organizational Barriers to Care. - Psychiatric services (Washington, D.C.)
This study examined sources of help (providers or nonproviders) used by soldiers for mental health problems. Differences in perceived barriers to care by type of help used were also assessed.Active-duty soldiers from four brigade combat teams (N=3,380) were surveyed in 2008-2009. Items assessed posttraumatic stress disorder; depression; anxiety; help needed because of a stress, emotional, alcohol, or family problem; stigma; negative attitudes toward care; and organizational barriers. Participants reported receipt of help in the past three months from providers (mental health or medical professionals or an Army resource hotline) or nonproviders (fellow soldier, medic, chaplain, or chain of command).Nearly a third (31%) were identified as being in need of mental health care. Of those, 5% reported using nonprovider help exclusively, 14% used provider help exclusively, and 7% used both types. Stigma was rated significantly lower as a barrier among those who used help exclusively from providers than among those who did not use help from any source; however, no significant differences in stigma scores were found between those who used help from nonproviders and those who did not use help from any source. Soldiers who used help from nonproviders were more likely than those who used help from providers to perceive organizational barriers.Results show that soldiers may view nonproviders as alternative sources of mental health help, suggesting that the Army should ensure that such resources are adequately trained and integrated into the mental health community so that soldiers can receive the help they need.
Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Exocytosis and Gamma-Aminobutyric Acidergic Interneuron Synapse by the Schizophrenia Susceptibility Gene Dysbindin-1. - Biological psychiatry
Genetic variations in dystrobrevin binding protein 1 (DTNBP1 or dysbindin-1) have been implicated as risk factors in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The encoded protein dysbindin-1 functions in the regulation of synaptic activity and synapse development. Intriguingly, a loss of function mutation in Dtnbp1 in mice disrupted both glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic transmission in the cerebral cortex; pyramidal neurons displayed enhanced excitability due to reductions in inhibitory synaptic inputs. However, the mechanism by which reduced dysbindin-1 activity causes inhibitory synaptic deficits remains unknown.We investigated the role of dysbindin-1 in the exocytosis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) from cortical excitatory neurons, organotypic brain slices, and acute slices from dysbindin-1 mutant mice and determined how this change in BDNF exocytosis transsynaptically affected the number of inhibitory synapses formed on excitatory neurons via whole-cell recordings, immunohistochemistry, and live-cell imaging using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy.A decrease in dysbindin-1 reduces the exocytosis of BDNF from cortical excitatory neurons, and this reduction in BDNF exocytosis transsynaptically resulted in reduced inhibitory synapse numbers formed on excitatory neurons. Furthermore, application of exogenous BDNF rescued the inhibitory synaptic deficits caused by the reduced dysbindin-1 level in both cultured cortical neurons and slice cultures.Taken together, our results demonstrate that these two genes linked to risk for schizophrenia (BDNF and dysbindin-1) function together to regulate interneuron development and cortical network activity. This evidence supports the investigation of the association between dysbindin-1 and BDNF in humans with schizophrenia.Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Moberg Osteotomy Shifts Contact Pressure Plantarly in the First Metatarsophalangeal Joint in a Biomechanical Model. - Foot & ankle international
A proximal phalangeal dorsiflexion osteotomy (Moberg osteotomy) is commonly used to treat hallux rigidus, but the mechanical explanation for its effectiveness is unclear. The purpose of our study was to test the effect of a Moberg osteotomy on first metatarsophalangeal joint contact mechanics.Ten cadaveric first ray specimens were dissected, with the medial band of the plantar aponeurosis preserved at its origin, and placed in a custom testing apparatus. Forefoot loads during mid-stance with the first metatarsal positioned at 10 degrees were simulated using a custom-made loading jig while contact mechanics were acquired with a thin pressure-sensitive sensor. A Moberg osteotomy was performed starting 9 mm distal to the proximal phalanx with excision of a 3-mm wedge of bone and fixated with a 2-mm Kirschner wire. The effect of the Moberg osteotomy was tested by reapplying the forefoot loads and acquiring the joint pressures. The center of pressure, peak pressure, and contact area were calculated. Paired t tests were performed to determine if the Moberg osteotomy affected joint contact mechanics.The Moberg osteotomy shifted the center of contact pressure on the proximal phalanx surface more plantarly (P < .01). However, the Moberg osteotomy did not affect the peak pressure (P = .62) or the joint contact area (P = .96).There were no differences in peak pressure or first MTPJ contact area, but a plantar shift in the center of pressure occurred after the Moberg osteotomy.The plantar cartilage, which is often spared from arthritic changes, may be preferentially loaded and the potential edge loading following cheilectomy may be avoided with the Moberg osteotomy secondary to the plantar shift of center of pressure.© The Author(s) 2015.
Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation: past, present, and future. - Surgical technology international
Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi) is a novel treatment option that provides the combination of negative pressure with intermittent instillation of a solution. Standard Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is an established adjunctive treatment option that offers the ability to promote granulation tissue in wounds. However, there is limited evidence for its utility in the environment of active or senescent infection. Wounds that are acutely infected or that contain deleterious biofilm are a challenging problem, which require an intensive multimodal approach including antibiosis, surgical intervention, and local wound care. Adjunctive application of NPWTi can potentially expedite clearance of infection and wound closure. Although this technology has been commercially available for over a decade, its adoption has been limited. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in this therapy with emerging evidence from animal models as well as human clinical studies. There are remaining questions regarding NPWTi including the selection of the optimal instillation solution and device settings. This article discusses the past development, current knowledge, and future direction of NPWTi.
Do Patients With a Failed Metal-on-metal Hip Implant With a Pseudotumor Present Differences in Their Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Subpopulations? - Clinical orthopaedics and related research
Early adverse tissue reactions around metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements, especially pseudotumors, are a major concern. Because the causes and pathomechanisms of these pseudotumors remain largely unknown, clinical monitoring of patients with MoM bearings is challenging.The purpose of this study was to compare the lymphocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood from patients with a failed MoM hip implant with and without a pseudotumor and patients with a well-functioning MoM hip implant without a pseudotumor. Potential differences in the systemic immune response are expected to reflect local differences in the periprosthetic tissues.Consenting patients who underwent a revision of a failed MoM hip implant at The Ottawa Hospital (TOH) from 2011 to 2014, or presented with a well-functioning MoM hip implant for a postoperative clinical followup at TOH from 2012 to 2013, were recruited for this study, unless they met any of the exclusion criteria (including diagnosed conditions that can affect peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations). Patients with a failed implant were divided into two groups: those with a pseudotumor (two hip resurfacings and five total hip arthroplasties [THAs]) and those without a pseudotumor (10 hip resurfacings and two THAs). Patients with a well-functioning MoM hip implant (nine resurfacings and three THAs) at 5 or more years postimplantation and who did not have a pseudotumor as demonstrated sonographically served as the control group. Peripheral blood subpopulations of T cells (specifically T helper [Th] and cytotoxic T [Tc]), B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, memory T and B cells as well as type 1 (expressing interferon-γ) and type 2 (expressing interleukin-4) Th and Tc cells were analyzed by flow cytometry after immunostaining. Serum concentrations of cobalt and chromium were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.The mean percentages of total memory T cells and, specifically, memory Th and memory Tc cells were lower in patients with a failed MoM hip implant with a pseudotumor than in both patients with a failed implant without a pseudotumor and patients with a well-functioning implant without a pseudotumor (memory Th cells: 29% ± 5% [means ± SD] versus 55% ± 17%, d = 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.2, 2.5] and versus 48% ± 14%, d = 1.6, 95% CI [1.0, 2.2], respectively; memory Tc cells: 18% ± 5% versus 45% ± 14%, d = 2.3, 95% CI [1.5, 3.1] and versus 41% ± 12%, d = 2.3, 95% CI [1.5, 3.1], respectively; p < 0.001 in all cases). The mean percentage of memory B cells was also lower in patients with a failed MoM hip implant with a pseudotumor than in patients with a well-functioning implant without a pseudotumor (12% ± 8% versus 29% ± 16%, d = 1.3, 95% CI [0.7, 1.8], p = 0.025). In addition, patients with a failed MoM hip implant with a pseudotumor had overall lower percentages of type 1 Th cells than both patients with a failed implant without a pseudotumor and patients with a well-functioning implant without a pseudotumor (5.5% [4.9%-5.8%] [median with interquartile range] versus 8.7% [6.5%-10.2%], d = 1.4, 95% CI [0.8, 2.0] and versus 9.6% [6.4%-11.1%], d = 1.6, 95% CI [1.0, 2.2], respectively; p ≤ 0.010 in both cases). Finally, serum cobalt concentrations in patients with a failed MoM hip implant with a pseudotumor were overall higher than those in patients with a well-functioning implant without a pseudotumor (5.8 µg/L [2.9-17.0 µg/L] versus 0.9 µg/L [0.6-1.3 µg/L], d = 2.2, 95% CI [1.4, 2.9], p < 0.001).Overall, results suggest the presence of a type IV hypersensitivity reaction, with a predominance of type 1 Th cells, in patients with a failed MoM hip implant with a pseudotumor.The lower percentages of memory T cells (specifically Th and Tc) as well as type 1 Th cells in peripheral blood of patients with a failed MoM hip implant with a pseudotumor could potentially become diagnostic biomarkers for the detection of pseudotumors. Although implant design (hip resurfacing or THA) did not seem to affect the results, as suggested by the scatter of the data with respect to this parameter, future studies with additional patients could include the analysis of implant design in addition to correlations with histological analyses of specific Th subsets in periprosthetic tissues.

Map & Directions

1011 Reed Ave Suite 300 Wyomissing, PA 19610
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