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Dr. Jane  Chiu  Md image

Dr. Jane Chiu Md

22101 Moross Rd Pb2 Suite 50
Detroit MI 48236
313 437-7774
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 4301103277
NPI: 1225478944
Taxonomy Codes:
207R00000X

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Publications

Exposing operations of power in supervisory relationships. - Family process
Through a poststructural lens, we examine how power may show itself in relationships between supervisees and supervisors, producing both helpful and harmful effects. Drawing from our own experiences, as well as conversations with other members of our supervisory group, we demonstrate how privileged discourses around professional status, gender, and race may bring about difficulties including a sense of doubt, worry, inadequacy, and a fear of speaking up. We also illustrate how these difficulties can be addressed in a manner that may lessen their influence, while increasing supervisees' sense of agency.
Curcumin prevents diabetes-associated abnormalities in the kidneys by inhibiting p300 and nuclear factor-kappaB. - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.)
Diabetic nephropathy is a debilitating disease that leads to end-stage renal failure in the Western world. Hyperglycemia is the initiating factor in several chronic diabetic complications which mediates increased oxidative stress and eventually the increased production of vasoactive factors and extracellular matrix proteins. We hypothesized that curcumin, a potent antioxidant, might be beneficial in preventing the development of diabetic nephropathy because this compound has been shown to inhibit p300, a histone acetyltransferase that plays a role in regulating gene expression through its interaction with the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB.To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with streptozotocin to induce diabetes. These animals were subsequently treated with curcumin for a period of 1 mo.Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that diabetes-induced upregulation of vasoactive factors (endothelial nitric oxide synthase and endothelin-1), transforming growth factor-beta1 and extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin and extradomain-B-containing fibronectin) in the kidneys. These changes were associated with increased oxidative stress, mesangial expansion, and p300 and nuclear factor-kappaB activity that were prevented with curcumin treatment.These beneficial effects of curcumin were mediated through the inhibition of p300 and nuclear factor-kappaB.
Curcumin prevents diabetes-associated abnormalities in the kidneys by inhibiting p300 and nuclear factor-kappaB. - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.)
Diabetic nephropathy is a debilitating disease that leads to end-stage renal failure in the Western world. Hyperglycemia is the initiating factor in several chronic diabetic complications which mediates increased oxidative stress and eventually the increased production of vasoactive factors and extracellular matrix proteins. We hypothesized that curcumin, a potent antioxidant, might be beneficial in preventing the development of diabetic nephropathy because this compound has been shown to inhibit p300, a histone acetyltransferase that plays a role in regulating gene expression through its interaction with the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB.To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with streptozotocin to induce diabetes. These animals were subsequently treated with curcumin for a period of 1 mo.Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that diabetes-induced upregulation of vasoactive factors (endothelial nitric oxide synthase and endothelin-1), transforming growth factor-beta1 and extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin and extradomain-B-containing fibronectin) in the kidneys. These changes were associated with increased oxidative stress, mesangial expansion, and p300 and nuclear factor-kappaB activity that were prevented with curcumin treatment.These beneficial effects of curcumin were mediated through the inhibition of p300 and nuclear factor-kappaB.
PARP mediates structural alterations in diabetic cardiomyopathy. - Journal of molecular and cellular cardiology
Diabetic cardiomyopathy is characterized by structural alterations such as cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, necrosis and focal fibrosis. Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damage may play an important role in this pathogenetic process. Recent studies have shown that poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is activated in response to oxidative stress and cellular damage as well, plays a role in gene expression. This study investigated mechanisms of diabetes-induced, PARP-mediated development of structural alterations in the heart. Two models of diabetic complications were used to determine the role of PARP in oxidative stress, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in the heart. PARP-1 knockout (PARP(-/-)) mice and their respective controls were fed a 30% galactose diet while male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with streptozotocin and subsequently treated with PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide (ABA). The in vivo experiments were verified in in vitro models which utilized both neonatal cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. Our results indicate that hyperhexosemia caused upregulation of extracellular matrix proteins in association with increased transcriptional co-activator p300 levels, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and increased oxidative stress. These pathogenetic changes were not observed in the PARP(-/-) mice and diabetic rats treated with ABA. Furthermore, these changes appear to be influenced by histone deacetylases. Similar results were obtained in isolated cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. This study has elucidated for the first time a PARP-dependent, p300-associated pathway mediating the development of structural alterations in the diabetic heart.
Oxidative stress-induced, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-dependent upregulation of ET-1 expression in chronic diabetic complications. - Canadian journal of physiology and pharmacology
Hyperglycemia in diabetes induces increased endothelin-1 (ET-1) production in the retina, kidney, and heart that may lead to hemodynamic impairment, permeability alteration, and increased extracellular matrix (ECM) protein production. Chronically elevated blood glucose levels may cause oxidative stress in these target tissues of diabetic complications. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a nuclear enzyme activated by DNA strand breaks due to oxidative stress. We investigated the role of PARP in regulating ET-1 expression and ET-1-induced abnormalities in the targets organs of diabetic complications. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with streptozotocin to induce diabetes. Once diabetes was established, half of the diabetic rats were randomly chosen to receive PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide for 4 months. In a second set of experiments, PARP-/- mice and their controls were fed for 2 months with either a normal rodent diet or a 30% galactose diet to induce a normoinsulinemic hyperhexosemic state. Tissues harvested at the conclusion of both experiments were then subjected to real-time RT-PCR analysis for mRNA expression and immunohistochemical assessment of oxidative stress. In both experiments, the hyperhexosemic state upregulated expression of ET-1 mRNA in the retina, kidney, and heart. Furthermore, upregulation of ET-1-dependent ECM transcripts, such as fibronectin and extradomain B-containing fibronectin, was noted in all tissues. These tissues also demonstrated oxidative stress, as evidenced by the presence of nuclei positive for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. In contrast, inhibition of PARP, either through a chemical means in the diabetic rats or by genetic manipulation in the galactose-fed animals, prevented both oxidative stress and hyperhexosemia-induced upregulation of these genes. These results suggest that, in diabetes, oxidative stress and PARP activation may produce their effects through ET-1. Hence, blockade of such pathways may constitute potential adjuvant treatment modalities in chronic diabetic complications.
Regulation of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in diabetes at the transcriptional level. - American journal of physiology. Endocrinology and metabolism
Diabetic cardiomyopathy, structurally characterized by cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and increased extracellular matrix (ECM) protein deposition, eventually leads to heart failure. We investigated the role of transcriptional coactivator p300 and its interaction with myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) in diabetes-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to variable levels of glucose. Cardiomyocytes were analyzed with respect to their size. mRNA expression of p300, MEF2A, MEF2C, atrial natriuretic polypeptide (ANP), brain natriuretic polypeptide (BNP), angiotensinogen (ANG), cAMP-responsive element binding protein-binding protein (CBP), and protein analysis of MEF2 were done with or without p300 blockade. We investigated the hearts of STZ-induced diabetic rats and compared them with age- and sex-matched controls after 1 and 4 mo of followup with or without treatment with p300 blocker curcumin. The results were that cardiomyocytes, exposed to 25 mM glucose for 48 h, showed cellular hypertrophy and augmented mRNA expression of ANP, BNP, and ANG, molecular markers of cardiac hypertrophy. Glucose caused a duration-dependent increase of mRNA and protein expression in MEF2A and MEF2C and transcriptional coactivator p300. Curcumin, a p300 blocker, and p300 siRNA prevented these abnormalities. Similarly, ANP, BNP, and ANG mRNA expression was significantly higher in the hearts of diabetic rats compared with the controls, in association with increased p300, MEF2A, and MEF2C expression. Treatment with p300 blocker curcumin prevented diabetes-induced upregulation of these transcripts. We concluded that data from these studies demonstrate a novel glucose-induced epigenetic mechanism regulating gene expression and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in diabetes.
PARP activation and the alteration of vasoactive factors and extracellular matrix protein in retina and kidney in diabetes. - Diabetes/metabolism research and reviews
The development of diabetic complications is associated with increased oxidative stress which may damage DNA leading to the activation of nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). PARP overactivation may further exacerbate the oxidative state of the cell through its consumption of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. In diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, early characteristic features include increased production of vasoactive factors such as endothelin 1 (ET-1) and increased synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as fibronectin (FN) and its splice variant extra domain B containing (EDB(+)) FN. We investigated the role of PARP in the development of diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy.Two models of diabetic complications were used. PARP-1 knockout mice and their respective wild type controls were fed a 30% galactose diet for 2 months. The rats were given injections of PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide (30 mg/kg/day).Analysis of the retinal and kidney tissues showed hyperhexosemia-induced oxidative stress and increased expression of ET-1, FN and EDB(+) FN in association with increased transcriptional co-activator p300 along with p300-dependent transcription factors, myocyte enhancing factors 2A and 2C. Furthermore, we showed increased PARP expression in the kidneys and retina of the diabetic rats. PARP blockade in both animal models prevented these hyperhexosemia-induced effects.These findings suggests that hyperhexosemia and diabetes causes upregulation of ET-1, FN and EDB(+) FN at the transcriptional level in the retina and kidney via a signaling pathway mediated by PARP and an epigenetic mechanism involving p300 and MEF2 transcription factors. Understanding these mechanisms is important in identifying novel treatment targets.
Diabetes-induced extracellular matrix protein expression is mediated by transcription coactivator p300. - Diabetes
Increased fibronectin expression is a key feature of diabetic angiopathy. We have previously shown that nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) mediates fibronectin expression in endothelial cells and in organs affected by diabetes complications. p300, a transcription coactivator, may regulate NF-kappaB activity via poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation. Hence, we examined the role of p300 in fibronectin expression in diabetes. High glucose induced fibronectin expression in the endothelial cells, which was associated with increased p300, PARP activity, and NF-kappaB activation. This p300 alteration is mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase and protein kinase C and B. We then used p300 small interfering RNA (siRNA) and showed decreased fibronectin and PARP expression, as well as NF-kappaB activation, in the endothelial cells. Examination of the heart tissues of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice revealed increased fibronectin and p300 mRNA. Intravenous injection of p300 siRNA resulted in decreased p300 levels and normalized fibronectin expression in the heart. We further investigated retinal tissues from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats treated with intravitreal p300 siRNA injection. Similar to the heart, p300 siRNA inhibited fibronectin expression in the retina of the diabetic animals. These results indicate that transcriptional coactivator p300 may regulate fibronectin expression via PARP and NF-kappaB activation in diabetes.

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