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Dr. Millie  Das  Md image

Dr. Millie Das Md

875 Blake Wilbur Drive Stanford Cancer Center
Stanford CA 94305
650 986-6000
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: A92503
NPI: 1225182322
Taxonomy Codes:
207R00000X 207RX0202X

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Publications

Dovitinib and erlotinib in patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: A drug-drug interaction. - Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
Erlotinib is a FDA approved small molecule inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor and dovitinib is a novel small molecule inhibitor of fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. This phase 1 trial was conducted to characterize the safety and determine the maximum tolerated dose of erlotinib plus dovitinib in patients with previously treated metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.Escalating dose cohorts of daily erlotinib and dovitinib dosed 5 days on/2 days off, starting after a 2-week lead-in of erlotinib alone, were planned. A potential pharmacokinetic interaction was hypothesized as dovitinib induces CYP1A1/1A2. Only cohort 1 (150 mg erlotinib+300 mg dovitinib) and cohort -1 (150 mg erlotinib+200mg dovitinib) enrolled. Plasma concentrations of erlotinib were measured pre- and post-dovitinib exposure.Two of three patients in cohort 1 had a DLT (grade 3 transaminitis and grade 3 syncope). Two of 6 patients in cohort -1 had a DLT (grade 3 pulmonary embolism and grade 3 fatigue); thus, the study was terminated. Erlotinib exposure (average Cmax 2308±698 ng/ml and AUC 0-24 41,030±15,577 ng×h/ml) approximated previous reports in the six patients with pharmacokinetic analysis. However, erlotinib Cmax and AUC0-24 decreased significantly by 93% (p=0.02) and 97% (p<0.01), respectively, during dovitinib co-administration.This small study demonstrated considerable toxicity and a significant pharmacokinetic interaction with a marked decrease in erlotinib exposure in the presence of dovitinib, likely mediated through CYP1A1/1A2 induction. Given the toxicity and the pharmacokinetic interaction, further investigation with this drug combination will not be pursued.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Angiogenesis and lung cancer: ramucirumab prolongs survival in 2(nd)-line metastatic NSCLC. - Translational lung cancer research
In the REVEL trial, ramucirumab, a monoclonal antibody to VEGFR-2, improved overall survival in combination with docetaxel compared to docetaxel alone in the second-line setting of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Along with bevacizumab and nintedanib, ramucirumab is the third anti-angiogenic agent that has yielded positive overall survival results in a phase III trial of patients with advanced NSCLC. Given the lack of effective therapies in the relapsed setting and the disappointing results of many other VEGF-targeted agents in lung cancer, the results from REVEL are encouraging. One of the major remaining hurdles is the identification of reliable predictive biomarkers in order to predict which patients are most likely to benefit from anti-angiogenic therapies. Despite the positive results seen in REVEL, the exact role of ramucirumab in the treatment paradigm of lung cancer remains to be seen given the modest survival benefit of 1.4 months and the lack of predictive biomarkers at this time.
ERCC1 expression in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) using a novel detection platform correlates with progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving platinum chemotherapy. - Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
To utilize a novel circulating tumor cell (CTC) technology to quantify ERCC1 expression on CTCs and determine whether ERCC1 expression levels predict efficacy of platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).ERCC1 expression was measured in 17 metastatic NSCLC patients who received platinum-based therapy and had ≥2 intact CTCs with acceptable ERCC1 expression assay results. ERCC1 levels were determined from average expression on individual CTCs in each sample. Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated from the date of therapy initiation.PFS decreased with increasing ERCC1 expression (p<0.04, F-test, linear regression). Lack of ERCC1 expression was associated with longer PFS (266 days versus 172 days, log-rank, p<0.02) in a Kaplan-Meier analysis using ERCC expression level of 1 as a cutoff (range 0-30). The difference in survival was statistically significant with a hazard ratio of 4.20 (95% CI 1.25-14.1, p<0.02, log-rank). PFS was also observed to decrease with increased cytokeratin (CK) expression (p<0.01 long-rank (Cox regression) and F-test (linear regression)). The hazard ratio is 4.38 (95% CI 1.76-10.9) for each log-change in CK value until progression was noted on imaging.Low expression of ERCC1 on CTCs correlates with PFS in patients with metastatic NSCLC receiving platinum-based therapy.Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Targeting VEGF in lung cancer. - Expert opinion on therapeutic targets
VEGF promotes tumor angiogenesis and is an important target in various malignancies, including NSCLC.Here, the authors review the data that led to the approval of bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against VEGF, in the treatment of lung cancer. The authors also review the key results from a number of Phase II and Phase III trials involving other anti-angiogenic agents being studied in NSCLC, including small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors against the VEGF-receptor and vascular-disrupting agents (VDAs).Results from ongoing studies and the identification of reliable biomarkers remain critical goals in understanding the exact role of these anti-angiogenic agents in the treatment paradigm of NSCLC.
Results from a single institution phase II trial of concurrent docetaxel/carboplatin/radiotherapy followed by surgical resection and consolidation docetaxel/carboplatin in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. - Clinical lung cancer
The optimal treatment of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial. We hypothesized that using a trimodality approach in selected patients with stage IIIA/IIIB disease would be both feasible and efficacious with reasonable toxicity.We enrolled 13 patients with resectable stage III NSCLC on a prospective phase II trial of trimodality therapy. Induction treatment consisted of weekly docetaxel 20 mg/m(2) and weekly carboplatin at an area under curve (AUC) of 2 concurrent with 45 Gy thoracic radiotherapy. Resection was performed unless felt to be unsafe or if patients had progressive disease. Postoperative consolidation consisted of docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) and carboplatin at an AUC of 6 every 3 weeks for 3 cycles with growth factor support.All patients responded to induction chemoradiotherapy as measured by total gross tumor volume reductions of 43% on average (range, 27%-64%). Twelve patients underwent resection of the tumor and involved nodes, yielding a resectability rate of 92%. The primary endpoint of 2-year overall survival (OS) was 72% (95% confidence interval [CI], 36%-90%), and 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 36% (95% CI, 9%-64%). The maximal toxicity observed per patient was grade II in 5 patients (38%); grade III in 7 patients (54%); grade IV in 1 patient (8%); and grade V in none.This trimodality approach resulted in promising outcomes with reasonable toxicity in carefully selected patients with stage III NSCLC at a single institution.Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.
Alternatives to surgery for early stage non-small cell lung cancer-ready for prime time? - Current treatment options in oncology
Surgery is the standard of care for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with lobectomy being the most oncologically sound resection. Medically inoperable patients and high-risk surgical candidates require effective alternatives to surgery; even operable patients may opt for less invasive options if they are proven to achieve similar outcomes to surgery. Minimally invasive local treatment modalities including dose-intensified conformal radiation therapy, most notably stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR; also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy), and thermal ablation methods such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA) are emerging as promising treatment options whose roles in the treatment of early stage lung cancer are being defined. Early clinical experience and a rapidly growing body of prospective clinical trials, primarily in medically inoperable patients, are demonstrating encouraging effectiveness and safety outcomes in some cases approaching historical results with surgery. Given the very poor prognosis of the medically inoperable patient population, these alternatives to surgery, particularly SABR, are starting to be considered appropriate first-line therapy in properly selected patients, and prospective cooperative group trials to evaluate and optimize RFA and SABR in specific patient subsets are being conducted. For operable patients, prospective multi-center and cooperative groups trials of SABR are ongoing or completed, and international randomized trials of SABR vs. surgery have been initiated. Thus, promising alternatives to surgery for early stage NSCLC are ready for prime time evaluation in the setting of clinical trials, and participation in ongoing trials for both operable and medically inoperable patients is strongly encouraged.

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