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Dr. Anitha  Rajamanickam  Md image

Dr. Anitha Rajamanickam Md

9500 Euclid Ave
Cleveland OH 44195
800 232-2273
Medical School: Other - 2000
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 35086070
NPI: 1225126600
Taxonomy Codes:
207R00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Anitha Rajamanickam is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$429.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$193.79
HCPCS Code:99239 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$232.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$101.50
HCPCS Code:99233 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$227.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$99.01
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$158.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$68.99

HCPCS Code Definitions

99233
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99239
Hospital discharge day management; more than 30 minutes
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1497879555
Internal Medicine
171
1902803612
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
89
1437102084
Diagnostic Radiology
32
1396784641
Diagnostic Radiology
26
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Rajamanickam has made to other doctors

Publications

Histopathological Evidence of Adventitial or Medial Injury Is a Strong Predictor of Restenosis During Directional Atherectomy for Peripheral Artery Disease. - Journal of endovascular therapy : an official journal of the International Society of Endovascular Specialists
To investigate the impact on restenosis rates of deep injury to the adventitial layer during directional atherectomy.Between 2007 and 2010, 116 consecutive patients (mean age 69.6 years; 56 men) with symptomatic femoropopliteal stenoses were treated with directional atherectomy at a single center. All patients had claudication and TASC A/B lesions in the superficial femoral or popliteal arteries. Histopathology analysis of atherectomy specimens was performed to identify adventitial injury. Clinical follow-up included physical examination and duplex ultrasound scans at 3, 6, and 12 months in all patients. The primary endpoint was the duplex-documented 1-year rate of restenosis, which was determined by a peak systolic velocity ratio <2.4. Patients were dichotomized by the presence or absence of adventitial or medial cuts as evaluated by histopathology.Adventitial injury were identified in 62 (53%) of patients. There were no differences in baseline demographic and clinical features (p>0.05), lesion length (58.7±12.8 vs 56.2±13.6 mm, p=0.40), or vessel runoff (1.9±0.6 vs 2.0±0.6, p=0.37) between patients with and without adventitial injury, respectively. The overall 1-year incidence of restenosis was 57%, but the rate was significantly higher (p<0.0001) in patients with adventitial or medial injury (97%, 60/62) as compared with those without (11%, 6/54).Lack of adventitial injury after atherectomy for femoropopliteal stenosis is strongly related to patency at 1 year.© The Author(s) 2015.
Optical coherence tomography assessment of the mechanistic effects of rotational and orbital atherectomy in severely calcified coronary lesions. - Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions : official journal of the Society for Cardiac Angiography & Interventions
This study sought to assess the mechanistic effect of rotational atherectomy (RA) and orbital atherectomy (OA) on heavily calcified coronary lesions and subsequent stent placement using optical coherence tomography (OCT).RA and OA are two main approaches to ablate coronary calcium. While small case reports have described the mechanistic effect of RA in calcified coronary lesions, there has been no imaging study to assess the effect of OA on coronary artery architecture and/or compare the effects of two atherectomy devices.This study analyzed 20 consecutive patients with OCT imaging performed after atherectomy and after stent implantation, RA (n = 10) and OA (n = 10).Postatherectomy OCT analysis identified tissue modification with deep dissections in around a third of lesions after RA and OA; however, post OA dissections ("lacunae") were significantly deeper (1.14 vs. 0.82 mm, P = 0.048). Post OA/RA lesions with dissections had significantly higher percentage of lipid rich plaques and smaller calcification arcs as compared to plaques without dissections. Stents after OA were associated with a significantly lower percent of stent strut malapposition than post RA stents (4.36 vs. 8.02%, P = 0.038).Although the incidence of dissections was comparable between RA and OA cases, OA resulted in deeper tissue modifications (lacunae) as shown by OCT imaging. The finding might provide an explanation for a better stent apposition after OA as compared to RA. Their impact on long-term outcome needs to be determined. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Impact of severe mitral regurgitation on postoperative outcomes after noncardiac surgery. - The American journal of medicine
Preoperative cardiac risk assessment scoring systems traditionally do not include valvular regurgitation as a criterion for adverse outcome prediction. We sought to determine the impact of significant mitral regurgitation on postoperative outcomes after planned noncardiac surgeries.Patients with significant mitral regurgitation (moderate-severe or severe) undergoing noncardiac surgery were identified using surgical and echocardiographic databases at the Cleveland Clinic. The mechanism of mitral regurgitation was identified and classified as ischemic or nonischemic. By using propensity score analysis, we obtained 4 matched controls (patients undergoing noncardiac surgery without mitral regurgitation) for each case. The primary outcome was defined as a composite of 30-day mortality, myocardial infarction, heart failure, and stroke. Secondary outcomes included 30-day mortality, myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, and atrial fibrillation.A total of 298 cases and 1172 controls were included in the study. The incidence of primary outcome was significantly higher among patients with mitral regurgitation (22.2%) compared with controls (16.4%, P=.02). Analysis of the secondary outcomes revealed significant differences in perioperative heart failure (odds ratio, 1.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-2.0) and perioperative myocardial infarction (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-7.3). Of patients with mitral regurgitation, those with ischemic mitral regurgitation had significantly more events than those with nonischemic mitral regurgitation (39.2% vs 13.3%, P<.001).Patients undergoing noncardiac surgery with significant ischemic mitral regurgitation are at higher risk of a composite adverse postoperative outcome, including short-term mortality, heart failure, myocardial infarction, and stroke.Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Impact of aortic stenosis on postoperative outcomes after noncardiac surgeries. - Circulation. Cardiovascular quality and outcomes
Preoperative management of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) who need noncardiac surgery (NCS) remains controversial. We sought to determine the impact of AS on the postoperative outcomes after NCS.Patients undergoing NCS with moderate AS (valve area: 1.0-1.5 cm(2)) or severe AS (valve area: <1.0 cm(2)) were identified using the surgical and the echocardiographic databases. Using propensity score analysis, we obtained 4 matched control patients without AS for each patient with AS undergoing NCS. The propensity score matching used the 6 revised cardiac risk index criteria, in addition to age and sex. Primary outcome was a composite of 30-day mortality and postoperative myocardial infarction. We matched 634 patients with AS undergoing NCS to 2536 controls. There were 244 patients with severe AS and 390 patients with moderate AS. Thirty-day mortality was 2.1% for AS patients compared with 1.0% in non-AS controls (P=0.036). Postoperative myocardial infarction was more frequent in patients with AS compared with controls (3.0% versus 1.1%; P=0.001). Combined primary outcome was significantly worse for both moderate and severe AS patients compared with respective controls (4.4% versus 1.7%; P=0.002; and 5.7% versus 2.7%; P=0.02, respectively). High-risk surgery, symptomatic severe AS, coexisting mitral regurgitation, and preexisting coronary disease were significant predictors of primary outcome in patients with AS.Presence of AS adversely affects postoperative outcomes among patients undergoing NCS, evidenced by a higher 30-day mortality and postoperative myocardial infarction after NCS.
Thiazolidinediones and risk of heart failure in patients with or at high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis and meta-regression analysis of placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials. - American journal of cardiovascular drugs : drugs, devices, and other interventions
Recent meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) demonstrated a higher risk of heart failure (HF) with the use of thiazolidinediones (TZDs). However, this effect may have been diluted by including active controls. Also, it is uncertain whether the risk of HF is similar with rosiglitazone and pioglitazone.This study quantified the risks of HF with the use of TZDs in patients with or at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), and evaluated differential effects by type of TZD. Secondarily, we evaluated risks of peripheral edema.We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of placebo-controlled RCTs evaluating the effect of rosiglitazone or pioglitazone on investigator-reported HF and edema. Articles published before 31 December 2009 were searched in MEDLINE, The Web of Science, and Scopus, and the data were extracted by three investigators. RCTs with ≥100 patients and ≥3 months of follow-up were included. We quantified the effect of TZDs as odds ratios (ORs) by using the Mantel-Haenzel and alternative models. We further evaluated the risk of serious/severe HF, and the effect of several trial characteristics on HF risk by subgroup analysis and meta-regression analysis.29 trials (n = 20 254) were evaluated. TZDs were significantly associated with HF (TZD 360/6807 [5.3%] vs placebo 234/6328 [3.7%], OR 1.59; 95% CI 1.34, 1.89; p < 0.00001). The risk of HF was higher with rosiglitazone than with pioglitazone (2.73 [95% CI 1.46, 5.10] vs 1.51 [1.26, 1.81]; p = 0.06). TZDs were associated with a similar risk of serious/severe HF (OR 1.47; 95% CI 1.16, 1.87; p = 0.002). Use of TZDs was also associated with edema (OR 2.04; 95% CI 1.85, 2.26; p < 0.00001). HF and edema risks were consistent using Peto and random effects models. Risks of HF were significantly high for the subgroups of trials including patients with or at high risk for type 2 DM, and for the subgroup of trials with ≥12 months of follow-up. Meta-regression analysis showed that trials with lower overall baseline risk had higher HF risks.In placebo-controlled trials of adult patients with or at high risk for type 2 DM, TZD therapy is significantly and consistently associated with a higher risk of HF. The risk of serious/severe HF is also increased with the use of TZDs. HF risks are similar to those of meta-analyses combining active- and placebo-controlled trials. The benefit/risk profile of TZDs should be considered when treating diabetic patients with or without prior HF.
Chronic diarrhea and abdominal pain: pin the pinworm. - Journal of hospital medicine
Enterobius vermicularis is the most common helminthic infection in the US. It is usually considered an innocuous parasite that at the most causes perianal itching. We report a case of an 84-year-old female patient from an assisted living facility who presented with symptoms of colitis for 2 months. On detailed history and exam, she was found to have E. vermicularis infection. All her symptoms resolved dramatically within 2 days after a single dose of albendazole. We want to emphasize the importance of including parasitic infections such as E. vermicularis in the differential diagnoses of patients presenting with symptoms of colitis.

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9500 Euclid Ave Cleveland, OH 44195
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