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Dr. Sharon  Shaw  Od image

Dr. Sharon Shaw Od

4150 Clement St
San Francisco CA 94121
415 214-4810
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 10809T
NPI: 1215055132
Taxonomy Codes:
152W00000X

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Publications

Merging leadership and innovation to secure a large health system. - Journal of healthcare protection management : publication of the International Association for Hospital Security
In this article the security system executive for a 13-hospital system spells out how partnering with capable and motivated vendors and gaining the cooperation of other departments enabled him to convert disparate security systems with equipment from multiple manufacturers into a cost-effective centralized system.
Novel hydrophobically modified asymmetric RNAi compounds (sd-rxRNA) demonstrate robust efficacy in the eye. - Journal of ocular pharmacology and therapeutics : the official journal of the Association for Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics
The major challenges of developing an RNAi therapeutic include efficient delivery to and entry into the cell type of interest. Conventional ("naked" and chemically stabilized) small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been used in the eye in the past but they demonstrated limited clinical efficacy. Here we investigated a recently developed class of small, hydrophobic, asymmetric RNAi compounds. These compounds, termed "self-delivering rxRNAs" (sd-rxRNA(®)), are extensively modified, have a small duplex region of <15 base pairs, contain a fully phosphorothioated single-stranded tail, and readily enter cells and tissues without the requirement for a delivery vehicle.We compared sd-rxRNA compounds with stabilized siRNAs in vitro (in ARPE-19 cells) and in vivo (intravitreal injection in mouse and rabbit eyes). Specifically, we investigated the retinal uptake, distribution, efficacy, and preliminary safety of sd-rxRNAs.Treatment with sd-rxRNAs resulted in uniform cellular uptake and full retina penetration in both animal models while no detectable cellular uptake was observed with stabilized siRNAs either in vitro or in vivo. Further, both in vitro and in vivo delivery (without any transfection reagent or formulation) resulted in a significant reduction of the targeted mRNA levels, which lasted 14-21 days in vivo. Retinal morphology and function were unaltered following a single administration of sd-rxRNAs.These data support the potential of developing sd-rxRNAs as a therapeutic for ocular disease.
Factors influencing the use of outcome measures in physical therapy practice. - Physiotherapy theory and practice
Use of outcome measures in physical therapy practice is central to evaluating the effectiveness of treatment interventions, providing accountability and addressing quality of physical therapy programs. There is limited discussion on barriers and facilitators to using outcome measures in physical therapy practice. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence a physical therapist when deciding to use outcome measures in clinical practice. Participants were 21 physical therapists, seven each from skilled nursing facilities, outpatient clinics, and inpatient rehabilitation facilities. A grounded theory approach was used for interview and data collection. Common themes were determined from the data and a theory developed to explain the rationale behind physical therapists' decisions to use or not use outcome measures in clinical practice. Three overlapping themes related to (1) concepts of time, (2) knowledge, and (3) facility culture were indentified as factors influencing the use of outcome measures. A fourth encompassing theme, professionalism, identified the value placed on the use of outcome measures in practice. Data revealed that therapists require more information on the outcome measures available, and this information needs to be easily accessible within the workplace. Therapists value information generated by using outcome measures in the clinical setting, but need information on what measures are available and psychometric properties. Information must be easily accessible and measures easy to use. Newer graduates and recent learners have a foundation in the use of outcome measures, but more needs to be done in the clinic and through continuing education to promote increased use and understanding.
Restoration of skeletal muscle defects with adult human cells delivered on fibrin microthreads. - Tissue engineering. Part A
Large-scale musculoskeletal wounds, such as those seen in trauma injuries, present poor functional healing prognoses. In severe trauma, when the native tissue architecture is destroyed or lost, the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle is diminished by scar formation. Here we demonstrate that a scaffold system composed of fibrin microthreads can provide an efficient delivery system for cell-based therapies and improve regeneration of a large defect in the tibialis anterior of the mouse. Cell-loaded fibrin microthread bundles implanted into a skeletal muscle resection reduced the overall fibroplasia-associated deposition of collagen in the wound bed and promoted in-growth of new muscle tissue. When fibrin microthreads were seeded with adult human cells, implanted cells contributed to the nascent host tissue architecture by forming skeletal muscle fibers, connective tissue, and PAX7-positive cells. Stable engraftment was observed at 10 weeks postimplant and was accompanied by reduced levels of collagen deposition. Taken together, these data support the design and development of a platform for microthread-based delivery of autologous cells that, when coupled to an in vitro cellular reprogramming process, has the potential to improve healing outcomes in large skeletal muscle wounds.
Engineered vascular tissue fabricated from aggregated smooth muscle cells. - Cells, tissues, organs
The goal of this study was to develop a system to rapidly generate engineered tissue constructs from aggregated cells and cell-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) to enable evaluation of cell-derived tissue structure and function. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells seeded into annular agarose wells (2, 4 or 6 mm inside diameter) aggregated and formed thick tissue rings within 2 weeks of static culture (0.76 mm at 8 days; 0.94 mm at 14 days). Overall, cells appeared healthy and surrounded by ECM comprised of glycosoaminoglycans and collagen, although signs of necrosis were observed near the centers of the thickest rings. Tissue ring strength and stiffness values were superior to those reported for engineered tissue constructs cultured for comparable times. The strength (100-500 kPa) and modulus (0.5-2 MPa) of tissue rings increased with ring size and decreased with culture duration. Finally, tissue rings cultured for 7 days on silicone mandrels fused to form tubular constructs. Ring margins were visible after 7 days, but tubes were cohesive and mechanically stable, and histological examination confirmed fusion between ring subunits. This unique system provides a versatile new tool for optimization and functional assessment of cell-derived tissue, and a new approach to creating tissue-engineered vascular grafts.Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.
The influence of neuropsychological characteristics on the use of CI therapy with persons with traumatic brain injury. - NeuroRehabilitation
The great prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its high economic costs make reducing TBI-related disability a national health care priority. In our research laboratory, CI therapy has been found to significantly improve upper extremity function for persons with chronic TBI. The results have suggested that persons with TBI are less likely to adhere to critical components of the CI therapy protocol than participants with stroke in other studies. Treatment outcomes have also been more variable. Our findings suggest that some cognitive skills appear related to treatment outcome. In addition, cognitive and behavioral deficits, commonly seen with participants with TBI, challenge the delivery of the standard CI therapy protocol with some persons. We discuss the implications of these neuropsychological factors for CI therapy used for chronic TBI and propose further research to more thoroughly investigate these issues.
Constraint-induced movement therapy for recovery of upper-limb function following traumatic brain injury. - Journal of rehabilitation research and development
A volunteer sample of 22 participants with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI) (onset >1 year) and relative hemiplegia that revealed moderate disability in the more-affected upper limb (UL) participated. Constraint-induced (CI) movement therapy (CI therapy) was employed for a 2-week period; treatments included massed practice, shaping of the more-affected UL, behavioral contracts, and other behavioral techniques for affecting transfer to a real-world setting. We used the Wolf Motor Function Test, the Fugl-Meyer Motor Performance Assessment, and the Motor Activity Log to measure outcomes. All outcome measures improved significantly as a result of the intervention. More-adherent participants had more improvement compared with less-adherent participants. These preliminary results suggest that CI therapy may be effective for improving UL motor function following chronic TBI.

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