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Dr. Mark  Williams  Md image

Dr. Mark Williams Md

1 Joslin Pl
Boston MA 02215
617 322-2477
Medical School: Indiana University School Of Medicine - 1977
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 45103
NPI: 1184653891
Taxonomy Codes:
174400000X 207RN0300X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Mark Williams is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:90960 Description:Esrd srv 4 visits p mo 20+ Average Price:$952.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$296.62
HCPCS Code:90961 Description:Esrd srv 2-3 vsts p mo 20+ Average Price:$770.48 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$247.10
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$573.43 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$203.21
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$373.97 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$138.24
HCPCS Code:36514 Description:Apheresis plasma Average Price:$300.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$96.26
HCPCS Code:99233 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$300.77 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$104.32
HCPCS Code:90945 Description:Dialysis one evaluation Average Price:$276.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$87.67
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$323.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$149.33
HCPCS Code:90935 Description:Hemodialysis one evaluation Average Price:$246.44 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$75.92
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$259.73 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$111.56
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$210.08 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$72.81
HCPCS Code:83970 Description:Assay of parathormone Average Price:$177.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$58.46
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$178.20 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$75.64
HCPCS Code:82306 Description:Vitamin d 25 hydroxy Average Price:$125.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$41.94
HCPCS Code:99231 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$116.08 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$39.70
HCPCS Code:80061 Description:Lipid panel Average Price:$82.17 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$15.68
HCPCS Code:82043 Description:Microalbumin quantitative Average Price:$64.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$7.66
HCPCS Code:82728 Description:Assay of ferritin Average Price:$74.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$19.30
HCPCS Code:82607 Description:Vitamin B-12 Average Price:$68.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$21.19
HCPCS Code:82172 Description:Assay of apolipoprotein Average Price:$67.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$21.95
HCPCS Code:82746 Description:Blood folic acid serum Average Price:$63.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$20.82
HCPCS Code:80053 Description:Comprehen metabolic panel Average Price:$45.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.85
HCPCS Code:83036 Description:Glycosylated hemoglobin test Average Price:$42.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$13.75
HCPCS Code:80051 Description:Electrolyte panel Average Price:$30.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$4.29
HCPCS Code:83550 Description:Iron binding test Average Price:$38.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.38
HCPCS Code:82565 Description:Assay of creatinine Average Price:$27.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.86
HCPCS Code:82947 Description:Assay glucose blood quant Average Price:$26.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$2.91
HCPCS Code:85025 Description:Complete cbc w/auto diff wbc Average Price:$33.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.02
HCPCS Code:81001 Description:Urinalysis auto w/scope Average Price:$25.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$4.48
HCPCS Code:82570 Description:Assay of urine creatinine Average Price:$27.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$7.33
HCPCS Code:85027 Description:Complete cbc automated Average Price:$28.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.17
HCPCS Code:83540 Description:Assay of iron Average Price:$28.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.18
HCPCS Code:84100 Description:Assay of phosphorus Average Price:$20.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.49
HCPCS Code:84550 Description:Assay of blood/uric acid Average Price:$19.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.02
HCPCS Code:36415 Description:Routine venipuncture Average Price:$18.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.00
HCPCS Code:84520 Description:Assay of urea nitrogen Average Price:$17.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$2.44

HCPCS Code Definitions

36514
Therapeutic apheresis; for plasma pheresis
90961
End-stage renal disease (ESRD) related services monthly, for patients 20 years of age and older; with 2-3 face-to-face visits by a physician or other qualified health care professional per month
90960
End-stage renal disease (ESRD) related services monthly, for patients 20 years of age and older; with 4 or more face-to-face visits by a physician or other qualified health care professional per month
90945
Dialysis procedure other than hemodialysis (eg, peritoneal dialysis, hemofiltration, or other continuous renal replacement therapies), with single evaluation by a physician or other qualified health care professional
90935
Hemodialysis procedure with single evaluation by a physician or other qualified health care professional
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99233
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99231
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused interval history; A problem focused examination; Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is stable, recovering or improving. Typically, 15 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1295773596
Internal Medicine
5,750
1497735500
Internal Medicine
3,139
1073550851
Nephrology
2,026
1104895556
Nephrology
2,023
1730161142
Nephrology
1,962
1922107234
Endocrinology
1,756
1053358747
Diagnostic Radiology
1,545
1497793277
General Surgery
1,477
1184661134
Nephrology
1,377
1013943026
Diagnostic Radiology
1,218
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Williams has made to other doctors

Publications

Overall Survival and Renal Function of Patients With Synchronous Bilateral Wilms Tumor Undergoing Surgery at a Single Institution. - Annals of surgery
Wilms tumor is the most common renal cancer in children. Approximately 5% of children with Wilms tumor present with disease in both kidneys. The treatment challenge is to achieve a high cure rate while maintaining long-term renal function. We retrospectively reviewed our institutional experience with nephron sparing surgery (NSS) in patients with synchronous bilateral Wilms tumor (BWT) operated on between 2001 and 2014.Imaging studies, surgical approach, adjuvant therapy, and pathology reports were reviewed. Outcomes evaluated included surgical complications, tumor recurrence, patient survival, and renal function, as assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate.A total of 42 patients with BWT were identified: 39 (92.9%) patients underwent bilateral NSS; only 3 patients (7.1%) underwent unilateral nephrectomy with contralateral NSS. Postoperative complications included prolonged urine leak (10), infection (6), intussusception (2), and transient renal insufficiency (1). Three patients required early (within 4 months) repeat of NSS for residual tumor. In the long-term, 7 (16.7%) patients had local tumor recurrence (managed with repeat NSS in 6 and completion nephrectomy in 1) and 3 had an episode of intestinal obstruction requiring surgical intervention. Overall survival was 85.7% (mean follow-up, 4.1 years). Of the 6 patients who died, 5 had diffuse anaplastic histology. All of the patients had an estimated glomerular filtration rate more than 60 mL/min/1.73 m at the last follow-up; no patient developed end-stage renal disease.In patients with synchronous, BWT, bilateral NSS is safe and almost always feasible, thereby preserving maximal renal parenchyma. With this approach, survival was excellent, as was maintenance of the renal function.
A ruthenium dimer complex with a flexible linker slowly threads between DNA bases in two distinct steps. - Nucleic acids research
Several multi-component DNA intercalating small molecules have been designed around ruthenium-based intercalating monomers to optimize DNA binding properties for therapeutic use. Here we probe the DNA binding ligand [μ-C4(cpdppz)2(phen)4Ru2](4+), which consists of two Ru(phen)2dppz(2+) moieties joined by a flexible linker. To quantify ligand binding, double-stranded DNA is stretched with optical tweezers and exposed to ligand under constant applied force. In contrast to other bis-intercalators, we find that ligand association is described by a two-step process, which consists of fast bimolecular intercalation of the first dppz moiety followed by ∼10-fold slower intercalation of the second dppz moiety. The second step is rate-limited by the requirement for a DNA-ligand conformational change that allows the flexible linker to pass through the DNA duplex. Based on our measured force-dependent binding rates and ligand-induced DNA elongation measurements, we are able to map out the energy landscape and structural dynamics for both ligand binding steps. In addition, we find that at zero force the overall binding process involves fast association (∼10 s), slow dissociation (∼300 s), and very high affinity (Kd ∼10 nM). The methodology developed in this work will be useful for studying the mechanism of DNA binding by other multi-step intercalating ligands and proteins.© The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.
Decoding Feedback to the Lesion Projection Zone of V1 in Individuals with Glaucoma. - Journal of vision
Feedback is a fundamental organising principle of the visual system. Using fMRI decoding methods, Jehee, Brady and Tong (2011) demonstrated that orientation information about an attended stimulus could be decoded in regions of V1 that were not directly activated by that stimulus. Their results have been interpreted as evidence for attention-driven feedback to V1. In normally sighted individuals, however, we cannot completely isolate feedback signals from activity due to feedforward processing. Individuals with monocular glaucoma present an opportunity to investigate feedback signals in the absence of direct visual input to the cortical region. We tested whether information about the orientation of a visible stimulus was present in the portion of visual cortex reflecting the scotoma location (lesion projection zone; LPZ) in individuals with glaucoma. We reasoned that if there is feedback to other regions of V1 when a stimulus is attended, then the same feedback could be observed in the LPZ of V1. We recruited subjects with monocular glaucoma of the right eye, and identified a scotopic quadrant and a relatively unimpaired quadrant of the visual field for each subject. Subject specific localization of the four quadrants of V1 was carried out using functional retinotopy (binocular viewing) and anatomical markers. Oriented gratings (3.5° radius, centered 5° from fixation) were presented (monocular viewing) in the visible quadrant. Subjects performed an orientation discrimination task while maintaining central fixation and covertly attending to the stimuli. Linear classifiers were then trained to predict stimulus orientation using neural data from each of the four quadrant regions. Although the decoding results were variable between subjects, for a subset of participants, stimulus orientation was indeed decodable from the LPZ quadrant. Our results provide proof of concept that feedback signals can be preserved in the absence of activity from direct visual input. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015.
The fovea is essential for peripheral vision: The effect of foveal distractors on extra-foveal perception. - Journal of vision
Neuroimaging evidence indicates that visual information about objects in the periphery is fed back to foveal retinotopic cortex in a new and separate representation. Additionally, delayed disruption of foveal confluence via transcranical magnetic stimulation impairs discrimination of objects in the periphery, suggesting this feedback mechanism is essential for extra-foveal perception. In this study, we developed a behavioural paradigm to further explore the nature of this feedback mechanism and provide a behavioural measure. Participants performed a discrimination task on objects in the periphery while fixating centrally. A visual distractor presented at the fovea 100ms after presentation of the peripheral stimulus disrupted perceptual discrimination more than visual distractors presented at other stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). In a control experiment, a visual distractor presented elsewhere in the periphery at the same SOAs did not impair behavioural performance. These results corroborate previous research showing foveal retinotopic cortex is essential for extra-foveal perception. This study also demonstrates a new paradigm for investigating the nature of the foveal feedback phenomenon. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015.
Rhizosphere bacterial communities of dominant steppe plants shift in response to a gradient of simulated nitrogen deposition. - Frontiers in microbiology
We evaluated effects of 9-year simulated nitrogen (N) deposition on microbial composition and diversity in the rhizosphere of two dominant temperate grassland species: grass Stipa krylovii and forb Artemisia frigida. Microbiomes in S. krylovii and A. frigida rhizosphere differed, but changed consistently along the N gradient. These changes were correlated to N-induced shifts to plant community. Hence, as plant biomass changed, so did bacterial rhizosphere communities, a result consistent with the role that N fertilizer has been shown to play in altering plant-microbial mutualisms. A total of 23 bacterial phyla were detected in the two rhizospheric soils by pyrosequencing, with Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Bacteroidetes dominating the sequences of all samples. Bacterioidetes and Proteobacteria tended to increase, while Acidobacteria declined with increase in N addition rates. TM7 increased >5-fold in the high N addition rates, especially in S. krylovii rhizosphere. Nitrogen addition also decreased diversity of OTUs (operational taxonomic units), Shannon and Chao1 indices of rhizospheric microbes regardless of plant species. These results suggest that there were both similar but also specific changes in microbial communities of temperate steppes due to N deposition. These findings would contribute to our mechanistic understanding of impacts of N deposition on grassland ecosystem by linking changes in plant traits to their rhizospheric microbes-mediated processes.
Inorganic/organic hybrid microcapsules: Melamine formaldehyde-coated Laponite-based Pickering emulsions. - Journal of colloid and interface science
A facile synthesis route to novel inorganic/organic hybrid microcapsules is reported. Laponite nanoparticles are surface-modified via electrostatic adsorption of Magnafloc, an amine-based polyelectrolyte allowing the formation of stable oil-in-water Pickering emulsions. Hybrid microcapsules can be subsequently prepared by coating these Pickering emulsion precursors with dense melamine formaldehyde (MF) shells. Employing a water-soluble polymeric stabiliser, poly(acrylamide-co-sodium acrylate) leads to stable hybrid microcapsules that survive an alcohol challenge and the ultrahigh vacuum conditions required for SEM studies. Unfortunately, the presence of this copolymer also leads to secondary nucleation of excess MF latex particles in the aqueous continuous phase. However, since the Magnafloc is utilised at submonolayer coverage when coating the Laponite particles, the nascent cationic MF nanoparticles can deposit onto anionic surface sites on the Laponite, which removes the requirement for the poly(acrylamide-co-sodium acrylate) component. Following this electrostatic adsorption, the secondary amine groups on the Magnafloc chains can react with the MF, leading to highly robust cross-linked MF shells. The absence of the copolymer leads to minimal secondary nucleation of MF latex particles, ensuring more efficient deposition at the surface of the emulsion droplets. However, the MF shells appear to become more brittle, as SEM studies reveal cracking on addition of ethanol.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) Reduces the Association Between Depressive Symptoms and Suicidal Cognitions in Patients With a History of Suicidal Depression. - Journal of consulting and clinical psychology
In patients with a history of suicidal depression, recurrence of depressive symptoms can easily reactivate suicidal thinking. In this study, we investigated whether training in mindfulness, which is aimed at helping patients "decenter" from negative thinking, could help weaken the link between depressive symptoms and suicidal cognitions.Analyses were based on data from a recent randomized controlled trial, in which previously suicidal patients were allocated to mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), an active control treatment, cognitive psychoeducation (CPE), which did not include any meditation practice, or treatment as usual (TAU). After the end of the treatment phase, we compared the associations between depressive symptoms, as assessed through self-reports on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996), and suicidal thinking, as assessed through the Suicidal Cognitions Scale (Rudd et al., 2001).In patients with minimal to moderate symptoms at the time of assessment, comparisons of the correlations between depressive symptoms and suicidal cognitions showed significant differences between the groups. Although suicidal cognitions were significantly related to levels of symptoms in the 2 control groups, there was no such relation in the MBCT group.The findings suggest that, in patients with a history of suicidal depression, training in mindfulness can help to weaken the association between depressive symptoms and suicidal thinking, and thus reduce an important vulnerability for relapse to suicidal depression. (PsycINFO Database Record(c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).
Structural Characteristics of Migrant Farmworkers Reporting a Relationship with a Primary Care Physician. - Journal of immigrant and minority health / Center for Minority Public Health
Migrant farmworkers are disproportionately affected by many adverse health conditions, but access healthcare sparingly. This study of migrant farmworkers examined the distribution and general characteristics associated with having access to healthcare. Access to healthcare was measured by asking whether the participants (N = 413) had a primary care physician. Majority of participants did not have a primary care physician. Female migrant workers (AOR = 2.823 CI: 1.575-4.103) with insurance (AOR = 6.183 CI: 4.956-11.937) who lived at study site for more than 5 years (AOR = 2.728 CI: 1.936-7.837) and born in the United States (AOR = 2.648 CI: 1.373-3.338) had greater odds to have a primary care physician than recent male migrants without insurance who were born outside United States. There is a need to focus on Community Health Centers and Migrant Health Centers in tailoring their services and to widen the implementation and improve funding of Accountable Care Organizations to improve access to care of migrant farmworkers.
The Fear-avoidance Components Scale (FACS): Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a New Measure of Pain-related Fear Avoidance. - Pain practice : the official journal of World Institute of Pain
Pain-related fear avoidance (FA), a common problem for patients with painful medical conditions, involves pain-related catastrophizing cognitions, hypervigilance, and avoidance behaviors, which can ultimately lead to decreased functioning, depression, and disability. Several patient-reported instruments have been developed to measure FA, but they have been criticized for limited construct validity, inadequate item specificity, lack of cutoff scores, and missing important FA components. The Fear-Avoidance Components Scale (FACS) is a new patient-reported measure designed to comprehensively evaluate FA in patients with painful medical conditions. It combines important components of FA found in prior FA scales, while trying to correct some of their deficiencies, within a framework of the most current FA model. Psychometric evaluation of the FACS found high internal consistency (α = 0.92) and high test/retest reliability (r = 0.90-0.94, P < 0.01). FACS scores differentiated between 2 separate chronic pain patient samples and a nonpatient comparison group. When clinically relevant severity levels were created, FACS severity scores were highly associated with FA-related patient-reported psychosocial and objective lifting performance variables. These results suggest that the FACS is a psychometrically strong and reliable measure that can help healthcare providers assess FA-related barriers to function and recovery.© 2015 World Institute of Pain.
The Relative Effectiveness of Various Instructional Approaches During the Performance and Learning of Motor Skills. - Journal of motor behavior
The authors examined the relative effectiveness of explicit internal-oriented instructions, explicit external-oriented instructions, and unguided discovery learning on the performance, acquisition, and learning of a motor skill using novice youth soccer players. Thirty-seven players (age = 9.9 ± 0.7 years) underwent 3 × 30 trials of instruction-specific blocks of practice. The accuracy of lofted soccer kicks was assessed under practice conditions (prior to and after the practice period and after each practice block) and transfer conditions (prior to and after the practice period). Our findings indicated that generalized explicit instructions have detrimental effects on performance, whereas the benefits of unguided discovery learning increase with the amount of practice undertaken and when performing under transfer conditions.

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1 Joslin Pl Boston, MA 02215
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