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Dr. David  Weinberg  Md image

Dr. David Weinberg Md

248 Pleasant St Ste 1600 Concord Eye Care
Concord NH 03301
603 242-2020
Medical School: Albany Medical College Of Union University - 1984
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #:
NPI: 1164502076
Taxonomy Codes:
207W00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:15823 Description:Revision of upper eyelid Average Price:$2,800.77 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$746.10
HCPCS Code:67904 Description:Repair eyelid defect Average Price:$2,473.60 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$792.92
HCPCS Code:67921 Description:Repair eyelid defect Average Price:$1,456.94 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$161.98
HCPCS Code:67950 Description:Revision of eyelid Average Price:$1,516.43 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$414.59
HCPCS Code:67914 Description:Repair eyelid defect Average Price:$1,265.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$172.92
HCPCS Code:68720 Description:Create tear sac drain Average Price:$1,803.07 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$740.86
HCPCS Code:68815 Description:Probe nasolacrimal duct Average Price:$912.81 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$139.26
HCPCS Code:68440 Description:Incise tear duct opening Average Price:$654.69 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$61.57
HCPCS Code:15260 Description:Skin full graft een & lips Average Price:$1,305.52 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$859.03
HCPCS Code:68440 Description:Incise tear duct opening Average Price:$460.71 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$90.86
HCPCS Code:67825 Description:Revise eyelashes Average Price:$500.14 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$133.19
HCPCS Code:67840 Description:Remove eyelid lesion Average Price:$633.61 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$285.85
HCPCS Code:14060 Description:Skin tissue rearrangement Average Price:$985.53 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$675.07
HCPCS Code:67810 Description:Biopsy of eyelid Average Price:$522.73 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$222.05
HCPCS Code:11441 Description:Exc face-mm b9+marg 0.6-1 cm Average Price:$351.07 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$158.16
HCPCS Code:68840 Description:Explore/irrigate tear ducts Average Price:$309.37 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$130.27
HCPCS Code:11440 Description:Exc face-mm b9+marg 0.5 < cm Average Price:$281.36 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$113.95
HCPCS Code:67820 Description:Revise eyelashes Average Price:$206.57 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$51.80
HCPCS Code:67800 Description:Remove eyelid lesion Average Price:$243.64 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$117.21
HCPCS Code:31231 Description:Nasal endoscopy dx Average Price:$290.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$203.35
HCPCS Code:92004 Description:Eye exam new patient Average Price:$214.76 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$147.55
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$222.92 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$161.18
HCPCS Code:92014 Description:Eye exam & treatment Average Price:$181.06 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$122.33
HCPCS Code:92285 Description:Eye photography Average Price:$78.65 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$25.36
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$153.73 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$105.83
HCPCS Code:92002 Description:Eye exam new patient Average Price:$125.85 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$80.14
HCPCS Code:92012 Description:Eye exam established pat Average Price:$128.15 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$84.47
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$110.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$71.59
HCPCS Code:92083 Description:Visual field examination(s) Average Price:$129.58 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$92.46
HCPCS Code:92082 Description:Visual field examination(s) Average Price:$102.73 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$71.89

HCPCS Code Definitions

68440
Snip incision of lacrimal punctum
68840
Probing of lacrimal canaliculi, with or without irrigation
68815
Probing of nasolacrimal duct, with or without irrigation; with insertion of tube or stent
68720
Dacryocystorhinostomy (fistulization of lacrimal sac to nasal cavity)
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
92285
External ocular photography with interpretation and report for documentation of medical progress (eg, close-up photography, slit lamp photography, goniophotography, stereo-photography)
92004
Ophthalmological services: medical examination and evaluation with initiation of diagnostic and treatment program; comprehensive, new patient, 1 or more visits
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
92002
Ophthalmological services: medical examination and evaluation with initiation of diagnostic and treatment program; intermediate, new patient
92082
Visual field examination, unilateral or bilateral, with interpretation and report; intermediate examination (eg, at least 2 isopters on Goldmann perimeter, or semiquantitative, automated suprathreshold screening program, Humphrey suprathreshold automatic diagnostic test, Octopus program 33)
92083
Visual field examination, unilateral or bilateral, with interpretation and report; extended examination (eg, Goldmann visual fields with at least 3 isopters plotted and static determination within the central 30°, or quantitative, automated threshold perimetry, Octopus program G-1, 32 or 42, Humphrey visual field analyzer full threshold programs 30-2, 24-2, or 30/60-2)
92014
Ophthalmological services: medical examination and evaluation, with initiation or continuation of diagnostic and treatment program; comprehensive, established patient, 1 or more visits
92012
Ophthalmological services: medical examination and evaluation, with initiation or continuation of diagnostic and treatment program; intermediate, established patient
67800
Excision of chalazion; single
31231
Nasal endoscopy, diagnostic, unilateral or bilateral (separate procedure)
67810
Incisional biopsy of eyelid skin including lid margin
15823
Blepharoplasty, upper eyelid; with excessive skin weighting down lid
15260
Full thickness graft, free, including direct closure of donor site, nose, ears, eyelids, and/or lips; 20 sq cm or less
11440
Excision, other benign lesion including margins, except skin tag (unless listed elsewhere), face, ears, eyelids, nose, lips, mucous membrane; excised diameter 0.5 cm or less
14060
Adjacent tissue transfer or rearrangement, eyelids, nose, ears and/or lips; defect 10 sq cm or less
11441
Excision, other benign lesion including margins, except skin tag (unless listed elsewhere), face, ears, eyelids, nose, lips, mucous membrane; excised diameter 0.6 to 1.0 cm
68440
Snip incision of lacrimal punctum
67914
Repair of ectropion; suture
67904
Repair of blepharoptosis; (tarso) levator resection or advancement, external approach
67820
Correction of trichiasis; epilation, by forceps only
67825
Correction of trichiasis; epilation by other than forceps (eg, by electrosurgery, cryotherapy, laser surgery)
67840
Excision of lesion of eyelid (except chalazion) without closure or with simple direct closure
67950
Canthoplasty (reconstruction of canthus)
67921
Repair of entropion; suture

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1821030511
Internal Medicine
654
1417941808
Ophthalmology
365
1255332169
Ophthalmology
338
1902807811
Ophthalmology
332
1154309581
Internal Medicine
311
1891736609
Internal Medicine
264
1144214461
Ophthalmology
249
1821033259
Urology
249
1588665475
Ophthalmology
244
1558305367
Internal Medicine
218
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Weinberg has made to other doctors

Publications

BOB CAT: a Large-Scale Review and Delphi Consensus for Management of Barrett's Esophagus With No Dysplasia, Indefinite for, or Low-Grade Dysplasia. - The American journal of gastroenterology
Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a common premalignant lesion for which surveillance is recommended. This strategy is limited by considerable variations in clinical practice. We conducted an international, multidisciplinary, systematic search and evidence-based review of BE and provided consensus recommendations for clinical use in patients with nondysplastic, indefinite, and low-grade dysplasia (LGD).We defined the scope, proposed statements, and searched electronic databases, yielding 20,558 publications that were screened, selected online, and formed the evidence base. We used a Delphi consensus process, with an 80% agreement threshold, using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) to categorize the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations.In total, 80% of respondents agreed with 55 of 127 statements in the final voting rounds. Population endoscopic screening is not recommended and screening should target only very high-risk cases of males aged over 60 years with chronic uncontrolled reflux. A new international definition of BE was agreed upon. For any degree of dysplasia, at least two specialist gastrointestinal (GI) pathologists are required. Risk factors for cancer include male gender, length of BE, and central obesity. Endoscopic resection should be used for visible, nodular areas. Surveillance is not recommended for <5 years of life expectancy. Management strategies for indefinite dysplasia (IND) and LGD were identified, including a de-escalation strategy for lower-risk patients and escalation to intervention with follow-up for higher-risk patients.In this uniquely large consensus process in gastroenterology, we made key clinical recommendations for the escalation/de-escalation of BE in clinical practice. We made strong recommendations for the prioritization of future research.
Effects of genetic and environmental risk assessment feedback on colorectal cancer screening adherence. - Journal of behavioral medicine
Little is known about the impact of genetic and environmental risk assessment (GERA) feedback on colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. In a recently completed randomized trial, primary care patients received GERA feedback based on a blood test for genetic polymorphisms and serum folate level (GERA Group) versus usual care (Control Group). Subsequently, participants were offered CRC screening. Among participants who received GERA feedback, being at elevated risk was negatively associated with prospective CRC screening adherence. Secondary analyses of data from this study were performed to identify independent predictors of adherence among participants who received GERA feedback. We obtained baseline survey, follow-up survey, and endpoint medical records data on sociodemographic background, knowledge, psychosocial characteristics, risk status, and adherence for 285 GERA Group participants. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to identify predictors of CRC screening adherence. Following a 6-month outcomes observation period, we also conducted two focus groups with GERA Group participants to assess their perceptions of GERA risk feedback and screening. Content analyses of focus group data were evaluated to gain insights into participant response to risk feedback. Overall, half of GERA Group participants adhered to screening within 6 months after randomization. Multivariable analyses showed a statistically significant interaction between race and GERA feedback status relative to screening adherence (p = 0.043). Among participants who received average risk feedback, adherence was comparable among whites (49.7 %) and nonwhites (54.1 %); however, among those at elevated risk, adherence was substantially higher among whites (66.7 %) compared to nonwhites (33.3 %). Focus group findings suggest that whites were more likely than nonwhites to view elevated risk feedback as a prompt to screen. In response to receiving elevated risk feedback, nonwhites were more likely than whites to report feeling anxiety about the likelihood of being diagnosed with CRC. Further research is needed to explore race-related CRC screening differences in response to GERA feedback.
Codon optimality is a major determinant of mRNA stability. - Cell
mRNA degradation represents a critical regulated step in gene expression. Although the major pathways in turnover have been identified, accounting for disparate half-lives has been elusive. We show that codon optimality is one feature that contributes greatly to mRNA stability. Genome-wide RNA decay analysis revealed that stable mRNAs are enriched in codons designated optimal, whereas unstable mRNAs contain predominately non-optimal codons. Substitution of optimal codons with synonymous, non-optimal codons results in dramatic mRNA destabilization, whereas the converse substitution significantly increases stability. Further, we demonstrate that codon optimality impacts ribosome translocation, connecting the processes of translation elongation and decay through codon optimality. Finally, we show that optimal codon content accounts for the similar stabilities observed in mRNAs encoding proteins with coordinated physiological function. This work demonstrates that codon optimization exists as a mechanism to finely tune levels of mRNAs and, ultimately, proteins.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Light-activated protein inhibition through photoinduced electron transfer of a ruthenium(II)-cobalt(III) bimetallic complex. - Journal of the American Chemical Society
We describe a mechanism of light activation that initiates protein inhibitory action of a biologically inert Co(III) Schiff base (Co(III)-sb) complex. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs from a Ru(II) bipyridal complex to a covalently attached Co(III) complex and is gated by conformational changes that occur in tens of nanoseconds. Reduction of the Co(III)-sb by PET initiates displacement of the inert axial imidazole ligands, promoting coordination to active site histidines of α-thrombin. Upon exposure to 455 nm light, the rate of ligand exchange with 4-methylimidazole, a histidine mimic, increases by approximately 5-fold, as observed by NMR spectroscopy. Similarly, the rate of α-thrombin inhibition increases over 5-fold upon irradiation. These results convey a strategy for light activation of inorganic therapeutic agents through PET utilizing redox-active metal centers.
Cold dark matter: Controversies on small scales. - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model has been remarkably successful in explaining cosmic structure over an enormous span of redshift, but it has faced persistent challenges from observations that probe the innermost regions of dark matter halos and the properties of the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites. We review the current observational and theoretical status of these "small-scale controversies." Cosmological simulations that incorporate only gravity and collisionless CDM predict halos with abundant substructure and central densities that are too high to match constraints from galaxy dynamics. The solution could lie in baryonic physics: Recent numerical simulations and analytical models suggest that gravitational potential fluctuations tied to efficient supernova feedback can flatten the central cusps of halos in massive galaxies, and a combination of feedback and low star formation efficiency could explain why most of the dark matter subhalos orbiting the Milky Way do not host visible galaxies. However, it is not clear that this solution can work in the lowest mass galaxies, where discrepancies are observed. Alternatively, the small-scale conflicts could be evidence of more complex physics in the dark sector itself. For example, elastic scattering from strong dark matter self-interactions can alter predicted halo mass profiles, leading to good agreement with observations across a wide range of galaxy mass. Gravitational lensing and dynamical perturbations of tidal streams in the stellar halo provide evidence for an abundant population of low-mass subhalos in accord with CDM predictions. These observational approaches will get more powerful over the next few years.
Assessing photoreceptor structure after macular hole closure. - Retinal cases & brief reports
To describe photoreceptor structure and recovery after macular hole (MH) closure with pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) using adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy and spectral domain optical coherence tomography.A pilot imaging study of four eyes from four subjects undergoing PPV for MH was conducted. Imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy was performed at varying time points after PPV.Despite successful MH closure, disruption of the foveal inner segment ellipsoid zone was seen in all patients when imaged at a mean of 117 days after PPV. Disruption of the photoreceptor mosaic was seen using adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy at locations corresponding to regions of ellipsoid zone disruption on spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Cone density immediately surrounding these disruptions was normal, except for one patient. In 2 patients who were imaged serially up to 516 days after PPV, recovery of cone cells within regions of mosaic disruption could be detected over time.Photoreceptor disruption exists even after apparent MH closure. Remodeling of the foveal cone mosaic continues for many months after surgery, perhaps accounting for the delayed postoperative improvements of visual acuity in some patients. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography and adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy are useful tools for monitoring photoreceptor recovery after surgical closure of MH.
Evaluating toxicity from definitive radiation therapy for prostate cancer in men with inflammatory bowel disease: Patient selection and dosimetric parameters with modern treatment techniques. - Practical radiation oncology
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is considered a contraindication to abdominopelvic radiation therapy (RT). We examined our experience in men with IBD who were treated with definitive RT for prostate cancer.We queried our institutional database for patients with a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, or IBD not otherwise specified. Endpoints were: acute and late ≥grade 2 (G2) GI toxicity and IBD flare after RT. Outcomes were compared with controls using propensity scoring matched 3 to 1. We matched controls to the IBD cohort according to: RT technique, RT dose, risk group, hormone use, treatment year, and age. We determined predictors of acute outcomes using the Fisher exact test and time to outcomes using the log-rank test.Between 1990 and 2010, 84 men were included. Sixty-three men served as matched controls and 21 with IBD: 13 ulcerative colitis, 7 Crohn disease, and 1 IBD not otherwise specified. For men with IBD, median age was 69 years, and median follow-up was 49 months. Median flare-free interval before RT was 10 years. Seven were taking IBD medications during RT. There was no difference in acute or late gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in the IBD group versus controls. Among IBD patients, IBD medication use was the only predictor of acute ≥G2 GI toxicity: 57.1% with medication versus7.7% without (49.4% absolute difference, 95% confidence interval [CI] 10.0%-88.9%, P = .03). The 5-year risk of late GI toxicity in men with IBD versus controls was not statistically significant (hazard ratio = 1.19, 95%CI 0.28-5.01, P = .83). The crude incidence of late ≥G2 GI toxicity was 10%.Acute GI toxicity appears to be exacerbated in patients on concomitant medical therapy for IBD. Overall, late GI toxicity was relatively low and not significantly different between patients with IBD versus no IBD. However, the small sample size limits the interpretation of our estimates and the wide confidence intervals indicate these patients warrant careful selection.Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Genetic and environmental risk assessment and colorectal cancer screening in an average-risk population: a randomized trial. - Annals of internal medicine
New methods are needed to improve health behaviors, such as adherence to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Personalized genetic information to guide medical decisions is increasingly available. Whether such information motivates behavioral change is unknown.To determine whether individualized genetic and environmental risk assessment (GERA) of CRC susceptibility improves adherence to screening in average-risk persons.2-group, randomized, controlled trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT0087360).4 medical school-affiliated primary care practices.783 participants at average risk for CRC who were not adherent to screening at study entry.Participants were randomly assigned to usual care or GERA, which evaluated methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphisms and serum folate levels. On the basis of prespecified combinations of polymorphisms and serum folate levels, GERA recipients were told that they were at elevated or average risk for CRC.The primary outcome was CRC screening within 6 months of study entry.Overall screening rates for CRC did not statistically significant differ between the usual care (35.7%) and GERA (33.1%) groups. After adjustment for baseline participant factors, the odds ratio for screening completion for GERA versus usual care was 0.88 (95% CI, 0.64 to 1.22). Within the GERA group, screening rates did not significantly differ between average-risk (38.1%) and elevated-risk (26.9%) participants. Odds ratios for elevated- versus average-risk participants remained nonsignificant after adjustment for covariates (odds ratio, 0.75 [CI, 0.39 to 1.42]).Only 1 personalized genetic and environmental interaction and 1 health behavior (CRC screening) were assessed.In average-risk persons, CRC screening uptake was not positively associated with feedback from a single personalized GERA. Additional studies will be required to evaluate whether other approaches to providing GERA affect screening utilization differently. These findings raise concern about the effectiveness of moderately predictive assessment of genetic risk to promote favorable health care behavior.National Institutes of Health.
Spin-selective charge recombination in complexes of CdS quantum dots and organic hole acceptors. - Journal of the American Chemical Society
This paper describes the mechanisms of charge recombination on both the nanosecond and microsecond time scales in a donor-acceptor system comprising thiol-modified bis(diarylamino)4,4'-biphenyl (TPD) molecules attached to a CdS quantum dot (QD) via the thiolate linker. Transient absorption measurements, in conjunction with EPR and magnetic field effect studies, demonstrate that recombination on the nanosecond time scale is mediated by radical pair intersystem crossing (RP-ISC), as evidenced by the observation of a spin correlated radical ion pair, the formation of the localized (3)*TPD state upon charge recombination, and the sensitivity of the yield of (3)*TPD to an applied magnetic field. These experiments show that the radical spins of the donor-acceptor system have weak magnetic exchange coupling (|2J| < 10 mT) and that the electron donated to the QD is trapped in a surface state rather than delocalized within the QD lattice. The microsecond-time scale recombination is probably gated by diffusion of the trapped electron among QD surface states. This study demonstrates that magneto-optical studies are useful for characterizing the charge-separated states of molecule-QD hybrid systems, despite the heterogeneity in the donor-acceptor geometry and the chemical environment of the radical spins that is inherent to these systems.
Microscopic inner retinal hyper-reflective phenotypes in retinal and neurologic disease. - Investigative ophthalmology & visual science
We surveyed inner retinal microscopic features in retinal and neurologic disease using a reflectance confocal adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO).Inner retinal images from 101 subjects affected by one of 38 retinal or neurologic conditions and 11 subjects with no known eye disease were examined for the presence of hyper-reflective features other than vasculature, retinal nerve fiber layer, and foveal pit reflex. The hyper-reflective features in the AOSLO images were grouped based on size, location, and subjective texture. Clinical imaging, including optical coherence tomography (OCT), scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, and fundus photography was analyzed for comparison.Seven categories of hyper-reflective inner retinal structures were identified, namely punctate reflectivity, nummular (disc-shaped) reflectivity, granular membrane, waxy membrane, vessel-associated membrane, microcysts, and striate reflectivity. Punctate and nummular reflectivity also was found commonly in normal volunteers, but the features in the remaining five categories were found only in subjects with retinal or neurologic disease. Some of the features were found to change substantially between follow up imaging months apart.Confocal reflectance AOSLO imaging revealed a diverse spectrum of normal and pathologic hyper-reflective inner and epiretinal features, some of which were previously unreported. Notably, these features were not disease-specific, suggesting that they might correspond to common mechanisms of degeneration or repair in pathologic states. Although prospective studies with larger and better characterized populations, along with imaging of more extensive retinal areas are needed, the hyper-reflective structures reported here could be used as disease biomarkers, provided their specificity is studied further.Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

Map & Directions

248 Pleasant St Ste 1600 Concord Eye Care Concord, NH 03301
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