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Dr. Farzin  Farhangnejad  Md image

Dr. Farzin Farhangnejad Md

2036 Glenview Dr
Las Vegas NV 89134
702 296-6992
Medical School: Other - 1993
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 11033
NPI: 1164429932
Taxonomy Codes:
208100000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Farzin Farhangnejad is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$593.03 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$198.79
HCPCS Code:99306 Description:Nursing facility care init Average Price:$481.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$164.00
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$403.77 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$135.59
HCPCS Code:99305 Description:Nursing facility care init Average Price:$379.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$129.56
HCPCS Code:99239 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$310.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$104.82
HCPCS Code:99233 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$304.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$101.61
HCPCS Code:99304 Description:Nursing facility care init Average Price:$270.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$91.73
HCPCS Code:99356 Description:Prolonged service inpatient Average Price:$267.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$90.00
HCPCS Code:99309 Description:Nursing fac care subseq Average Price:$261.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$88.35
HCPCS Code:99316 Description:Nursing fac discharge day Average Price:$244.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$101.69
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$212.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$70.83
HCPCS Code:99238 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$211.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$70.99
HCPCS Code:99308 Description:Nursing fac care subseq Average Price:$199.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$67.31
HCPCS Code:G0180 Description:MD certification HHA patient Average Price:$163.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$54.18
HCPCS Code:99231 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$117.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$38.74

HCPCS Code Definitions

99308
Subsequent nursing facility care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 15 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's facility floor or unit.
99306
Initial nursing facility care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's facility floor or unit.
99233
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99231
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused interval history; A problem focused examination; Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is stable, recovering or improving. Typically, 15 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99305
Initial nursing facility care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's facility floor or unit.
99304
Initial nursing facility care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed or comprehensive history; A detailed or comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of low severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's facility floor or unit.
99239
Hospital discharge day management; more than 30 minutes
99238
Hospital discharge day management; 30 minutes or less
99309
Subsequent nursing facility care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's facility floor or unit.
99356
Prolonged service in the inpatient or observation setting, requiring unit/floor time beyond the usual service; first hour (List separately in addition to code for inpatient Evaluation and Management service)
99316
Nursing facility discharge day management; more than 30 minutes
G0180
Physician certification for medicare-covered home health services under a home health plan of care (patient not present), including contacts with home health agency and review of reports of patient status required by physicians to affirm the initial implementation of the plan of care that meets patient's needs, per certification period
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1225129141
Family Practice
15,635
1104860436
Pulmonary Disease
7,397
1972547206
Pulmonary Disease
6,873
1811088800
Internal Medicine
6,834
1194734244
Plastic And Reconstructive Surgery
6,426
1083611859
Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation
4,041
1346288321
Diagnostic Radiology
3,488
1679630743
Nephrology
3,273
1457334864
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
3,131
1548296403
Pulmonary Disease
2,913
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Farhangnejad has made to other doctors

Publications

Separation and preconcentration of riboflavin from human plasma using polythionine coated magnetite/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite prior to analysis by surfactant-enhanced fluorimetry. - Spectrochimica acta. Part A, Molecular and biomolecular spectroscopy
The exploration of novel adsorption properties of conductive polymers based on hybridization with biocompatible nanomaterials receives an increasing interest. In this regard, hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic is of critical importance mainly owing to its facile synthesis, high surface area, economic and low toxicity in biological environments. In this work, we first prepared and characterized a magnetite/hydroxyapatite (Fe3O4/HA) nanocomposite using the bio-waste chicken eggshell via an attractive green way that involved low cost and irrespective of toxicity. Then, polythionine as a novel class of conductive polymers was in situ coated on the synthesized magnetic bioceramic for the separation and preconcentration of riboflavin (vitamin B2) in human plasma before its fluorimetric determination. Considering the putative role of riboflavin in protecting against cancer and cardiovascular diseases, it is essential to evaluate this vitamin in biological fluids. The described method possesses a linear range of 0.75-262.5μgL(-1) (R(2)=0.9985) and a detection limit of 0.20μgL(-1) (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for single-sorbent repeatability and sorbent-to-sorbent reproducibility were less than 4.0% and 7.6% (n=5), respectively. The respective enrichment factor and extraction recovery of the method found to be 35.7 and 98.4%. The analytical performance of method for riboflavin was characterized by good consistency of the results with those obtained by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) conventional method (p-value of <0.05). The optimized protocol intended for control determinations of riboflavin in human subjects and is addressed to clinical laboratories.Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Antibiotic Therapy for Chorioamnionitis to Reduce the Global Burden of Associated Disease. - Frontiers in pharmacology
Chorioamnionitis is associated with significant maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality throughout the world. In developed countries, great progress has been made to minimize the impact of chorioamnionitis, through timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment. In the global setting, where many women deliver outside the healthcare facilities, this diagnosis is frequently overlooked and not properly treated. In addition to its impact on maternal health, a significant proportion of neonatal morbidity and mortality can be prevented by both recognition and access to readily available treatment. With the increasing focus on saving the most vulnerable members of society, we echo the need for providing parturient women with suspected chorioamnionitis universal access to appropriate therapy. We describe known effective antibiotic therapies for chorioamnionitis and provide an overview of additional potential antimicrobial treatments that might be effectively implemented in areas with limited access to care.
Flow diversion: what can clinicians learn from animal models? - Neuroradiology
Flow diversion is increasingly used for treating intracranial aneurysms. This article aims to review the evidence obtained from animal models and summarizes the findings that might be of clinical interest.From a systematic review of studies published between 2000 and 2016, we extracted the data on the following questions: What roles do aneurysm dimension, morphology, and vascular geometry have on success of flow diversion? What characteristics of a flow diverter can influence aneurysm occlusion? What are the risk factors for jailed branch occlusion?Flow diversion has been shown to be less effective in occluding large aneurysms with wide or undefined necks, as compared to smaller aneurysms with narrower necks. Straight sidewall aneurysms were more likely to occlude after flow diversion than curved sidewall aneurysms or bifurcation aneurysms with branches originating from the neck or the fundus. The main characteristics of devices that may impact on the success of flow diversion are porosity and pore-density, but challenging aneurysm models were not better occluded with devices of lower porosity. Porosity is not uniform when devices deform to adapt to local in vivo anatomy when deployed. Neointima formation on devices correlates with low porosity. Branches are rarely occluded when they are jailed, but persistent branch flow may prevent aneurysm occlusion.Experimental models may help anticipate clinical results of flow diversion.
The correlation between preoperative erythrocyte sedimentation rate and postoperative outcome in adult cardiac surgery. - International journal of general medicine
Over the past decades, it has been recommended that preoperative assessment mainly relies on history and physical examination rather than unnecessary laboratory tests. In Iranian hospitals, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) has been routinely measured in most of the patients awaiting major surgery, which has in turn exacted heavy costs on the health system. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the preoperative routine measurement of ESR in such patients.This is a retrospective study, in which we evaluated the medical files of 620 patients. Patients older than 18 years, who had undergone elective heart surgery in our hospital in 2014, were included in the study. The data associated with demography, heart disease diagnosis, type of surgery, significant preoperative tests, delay or postponing of surgery and the reason for it, type and characteristics of the subspecialty consultation, and finally, postoperative complication and mortality rate were collected and analyzed. The patients were categorized into four groups according to ESR value: normal (<15 mm/h in females or <20 mm/h in males), moderately increased (<40 mm/h), severely increased (≥40 mm/h), and not measured.Of the 620 patients' files, 402 were of males and 218 were of females. Demographic values and preoperative characteristics were similar in the four groups. A total of 105 consultations were given to 79 patients preoperatively, where only in five cases, the elevation in ESR was the main reason for consultation. In no other cases did the consultations result in new diagnoses. Overall, postoperative complication and mortality rate were the same in all four groups; in severely increased ESR group, on the other hand, the need for long periods of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stays was higher than that of other groups.It is concluded that elevated preoperative ESR does not cancel or defer the surgery, nor does it help diagnose a new, previously undiagnosed disease. Furthermore, it does not generally affect postoperative morbidity or mortality rate unless increased to ≥40 mm/h, where it can increase postoperative ICU and hospital stay. Ultimately, routine preoperative ESR measurement in patients is not conducive to elective heart surgery.
Pregnancy after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a Fanconi anemia patient. - International medical case reports journal
Pregnancy in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) is rare. However, there are reports of successful pregnancy in Fanconi patients after bone marrow transplantation (BMT, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation). We describe the case of a term pregnant woman with FA who was treated with BMT 2 years earlier. She underwent successful delivery with cesarean section using spinal anesthesia without any complications.
Anti-inflammatory Potentials of Excretory/Secretory (ES) and Somatic Products of Marshallagia marshalli on Allergic Airway Inflammation in BALB/c Mice. - Iranian journal of parasitology
Inverse relationship between helminths infection and immune-mediated diseases has inspired researchers to investigate therapeutic potential of helminths in allergic asthma. Helminth unique ability to induce immunoregulatory responses has already been documented in several experimental studies. This study was designed to investigate whether excretory/secretory (ES) and somatic products of Marshallagia marshalli modulate the development of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in a mouse model.This study was carried out at the laboratories of Immunology and Parasitology of Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran during spring and summer 2015. Allergic airway inflammation was induced in mice by intraperitoneal (IP) injection with ovalbumin (OVA). The effects of ES and somatic products of M. marshalli were analyzed by inflammatory cell infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), pathological changes and IgE response.Treatment with ES and somatic products of M. marshalli decreased cellular infiltration into BALF when they were administered during sensitization with allergen. Pathological changes were decreased in helminth-treated group, as demonstrated by reduced inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell hyperplasia, epithelial lesion and smooth muscle hypertrophy. However, no significant differences were observed in IgE serum levels, cytokines and eosinophil counts between different groups.This study provides new insights into anti-inflammatory effects of ES and somatic products of M. marshalli, during the development of non-eosinophilic model of asthma. Further study is necessary to characterize immunomodulatory molecules derived from M. marshalli as a candidate for the treatment of airway inflammation.
Embolization with larger-caliber coils can increase packing density: Evidence from the pilot phase of a randomized trial. - Interventional neuroradiology : journal of peritherapeutic neuroradiology, surgical procedures and related neurosciences
Background and purpose Endovascular coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms is associated with suboptimal angiographic results in up to 20-30% of patients. Coil packing density has been used as an index of the success of the initial procedure. The trial sought to study the effects of using 15-caliber coils, as compared with 10-caliber coils, on packing density. Methods Does Embolization with Larger coils lead to better Treatment of Aneurysms (DELTA) is an investigator-initiated multicenter prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Patients are randomized 1:1 to embolization with either 10-caliber coils exclusively (control group) or the highest safely achievable proportion of 15-caliber coils and 10-caliber coils if necessary (intervention group) in 4-12-mm aneurysms. The endpoint of the pilot phase of the trial was the capacity to increase packing density of the initial procedure, calculated using a mathematical transformation of the dimensions entered into the case report forms. Secondary outcomes included the total number of coils used per aneurysm, total fluoroscopy time, initial angiographic outcomes and any adverse or undesirable event. Results Seventy patients were recruited between June 2014 and November 2015. Compared with 10-caliber coils, the 15-caliber coil group had a higher median packing density (44% vs 24%, p = 0.017). Results of other outcome measures were similar for the two groups. Conclusion Coiling of small and medium aneurysms randomized to 15-caliber coils achieved higher packing densities compared with coiling using 10-caliber coils.
Multifunctional magnetic nanostructured hardystonite scaffold for hyperthermia, drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. - Materials science & engineering. C, Materials for biological applications
Hyperthermia and local drug delivery have been proposed as potential therapeutic approaches for killing cancer cells. The development of bioactive materials such as Hardystonite (HT) with magnetic and drug delivery properties can potentially meet this target. This new class of magnetic bioceramic can replace the widely used magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, whose long-term biocompatibility is not clear. Magnetic HT can be potentially employed to develop new ceramic scaffolds for bone surgery and anticancer therapies. With this in mind, a synthesis procedure was developed to prepare multifunctional bioactive scaffold for tissue engineering, hyperthermia and drug delivery applications. To this end, iron (Fe(3+))-containing HT scaffolds were prepared. The effect of Fe on biological, magnetic and drug delivery properties of HT scaffolds were investigated. The results showed that obtained Fe-HT is bioactive and magnetic with no magnetite or maghemite as secondary phases. The Fe-HT scaffolds obtained also possessed high specific surface areas and demonstrated sustained drug delivery. These results potentially open new aspects for biomaterials aimed at regeneration of large-bone defects caused by malignant bone tumors through a combination of hyperthermia, local drug delivery and osteoconductivity.Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
CdTe amplification nanoplatforms capped with thioglycolic acid for electrochemical aptasensing of ultra-traces of ATP. - Materials science & engineering. C, Materials for biological applications
A "signal off" voltammetric aptasensor was developed for the sensitive and selective detection of ultra-low levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). For this purpose, a new strategy based on the principle of recognition-induced switching of aptamers from DNA/DNA duplex to DNA/target complex was designed using thioglycolic acid (TGA)-capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) as the signal amplifying nano-platforms. Owing to the small size, high surface-to-volume ratio and good conductivity, quantum dots were immobilized on the electrode surface for signal amplification. In this work, methylene blue (MB) adsorbed to DNA was used as a sensitive redox reporter. The intensity of voltammetric signal of MB was found to decrease linearly upon ATP addition over a concentration range of 0.1nM to 1.6μM with a correlation coefficient of 0.9924. Under optimized conditions, the aptasensor was able to selectively detect ATP with a limit of detection of 45pM at 3σ. The results also demonstrated that the QDs-based amplification strategy could be feasible for ATP assay and presented a potential universal method for other small biomolecular aptasensors.Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Agreement studies in radiology research. - Diagnostic and interventional imaging
The goal of this study was to estimate the frequency and the quality of agreement studies published in diagnostic imaging journals.All studies published between January 2011 and December 2012 in four radiology journals were reviewed. Four trained readers evaluated agreement studies using a 24-item form that included the 15 items of the Guidelines for Reporting Reliability and Agreement Studies criteria.Of 2229 source titles, 280 studies (13%) reported agreement. The mean number of patients per study was 81±99 (SD) (range, 0-180). Justification for sample size was found in 9 studies (3%). The number of raters was≤2 in 226 studies (81%). No intra-observer study was performed in 212 (76%) articles. Confidence intervals and interpretation of statistical estimates were provided in 98 (35%) and 147 (53%) of the studies, respectively. In 168 studies (60%), the agreement study was not mentioned in the discussion section. In 8 studies (3%), reporting of the agreement study was judged to be adequate. Twenty studies (7%) were dedicated to agreement.Agreement studies are preliminary and not adequately reported. Studies dedicated to agreement are infrequent. They are research opportunities that should be promoted.Copyright © 2016 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

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2036 Glenview Dr Las Vegas, NV 89134
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