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Dr. Jason  Wellen  Md image

Dr. Jason Wellen Md

1 Barnes Jewish Hospital Plz
Saint Louis MO 63110
314 627-7792
Medical School: Other - 2002
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: 2007008872
NPI: 1134331382
Taxonomy Codes:
204F00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Jason Wellen is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:50360 Description:Transplantation of kidney Average Price:$13,380.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$2,541.84
HCPCS Code:49422 Description:Remove tunneled ip cath Average Price:$1,927.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$350.13
HCPCS Code:50323 Description:Prep cadaver renal allograft Average Price:$1,500.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$68.61
HCPCS Code:49324 Description:Lap insert tunnel ip cath Average Price:$1,067.03 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$392.20
HCPCS Code:93990 Description:Doppler flow testing Average Price:$564.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$105.11
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$192.85 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$69.24
HCPCS Code:99231 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$128.74 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$37.85
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$180.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$103.61
HCPCS Code:99202 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$130.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$71.27
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$155.26 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$102.58
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$100.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$69.35

HCPCS Code Definitions

99202
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 20 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
49324
Laparoscopy, surgical; with insertion of tunneled intraperitoneal catheter
99231
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused interval history; A problem focused examination; Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is stable, recovering or improving. Typically, 15 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
49422
Removal of tunneled intraperitoneal catheter
93990
Duplex scan of hemodialysis access (including arterial inflow, body of access and venous outflow)
50360
Renal allotransplantation, implantation of graft; without recipient nephrectomy
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1750428025
Nephrology
4,921
1639197270
Nephrology
3,101
1851325534
Nephrology
810
1700903820
General Surgery
654
1265458574
Gastroenterology
612
1285650507
Nephrology
466
1194742650
Endocrinology
382
1144314477
Diagnostic Radiology
209
1780600254
Diagnostic Radiology
171
1427074749
Nephrology
165
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Wellen has made to other doctors

Publications

Successful use of minimal incision superficialization technique for arteriovenous fistula maturation. - Journal of vascular surgery
Successful cannulation is an important prerequisite for a functional arteriovenous fistula (AVF). Reasons for unsuccessful cannulation of an AVF are multifactorial and poorly evaluated. In our experience, a needle access segment (NAS) with a length of 10 cm, <5 mm deep from the skin surface, and >6 mm diameter assessed objectively using duplex Doppler ultrasound (DDUS) imaging, in a fistula with brachial artery flow >500 mL/min, permits consistent cannulation. This report provides observational data on the NAS of the outflow veins after fistula creation and a detailed long-term outcome on AVFs that needed superficialization of the NAS using minimal incision superficialization technique (MIST) to make them suitable for cannulation. This report is based on prospectively collected data with a longitudinal follow-up in a large patient cohort.A prospective database was used to analyze consecutive patients undergoing AVF until the study end point. All patients underwent a protocol-based maturation evaluation using color DDUS imaging. Unsuitable NAS were surgically corrected using superficialization (by MIST or lipectomy) of deeply situated veins or NAS reconstruction.Between February 1, 2007, and May 31, 2013, 617 new AVF surgeries were performed. Outflow vein superficialization (MIST or lipectomy) or NAS reconstruction was necessary in 226 of 585 procedures (38.6%) included in this analysis. Of these, 162 (72%) were performed using MIST, 50 (22%) with a single long incision, and 14 (6%) using lipectomy technique. Technical success for MIST was 100%, and only two fistulae failed to mature. The vein depth of 9.2 ± 3.2 mm during initial vessel mapping was similar to the pre-MIST depth of 9.1 ± 3.8 mm. Depth of NAS improved to 3.1 ± 1.0 mm after MIST. The secondary patency after MIST at 6, 12, 24, 48, and 60 months was 98%, 93.3%, 88.1%, 83.3%, and 80.9%. During the 400.8 post-MIST functional fistula-years, only 0.63 procedures per year were required to maintain AVF patency.Our data suggest that maturation of AVFs using objective criteria based on DDUS provides an opportunity to identify NAS problems in outflow veins before cannulation. Most of the of the AVF outflow veins (71.7%) could be transposed or superficialized using MIST, with excellent long-term outcomes.Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
ABO incompatible renal transplants and decreased likelihood for developing immune responses to HLA and kidney self-antigens. - Human immunology
Immune responses to HLA and tissue-restricted self-antigens (SAgs) have been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of renal allograft (KTx) rejection. However, ABO incompatible (ABOi) KTx recipients (KTxR) following depletion of antibodies (Abs) to blood group antigens had fewer rejections. To determine the mechanisms, pre- and post-transplant sera from ABOi (n=18) and ABO-compatible (ABOc) (n=45) KTxR were analyzed for Abs against HLA class I and II by LABScreen single antigen assay. The development of Abs to SAgs was measured by ELISA. Immunity to Collagen IV (Col-IV) and cytokines induced were measured by ELISPOT. While 8/45 (18%) ABOc KTxR developed new donor specific antibodies to HLA (DSA) following transplantation, 0/18 ABOi KTxR developed DSA. ABOi KTxR failed to develop Abs to kidney SAgs (Col-IV and fibronectin (FN)). In contrast, 7 ABOc KTxR developed Abs to both Col-IV and FN. Col-IV stimulation of lymphocytes from ABOc KTxR demonstrated increased IFNγ, IL-17 and decreased IL-10. In contrast ABOi recipients following stimulation with antigens resulted in more IL10 and reduced IFN-γ and IL17 production. At one year, the GFR in ABOi KTxR were significantly better (p<0.04) than ABOc KTxR. De novo DSA and immune responses to SAgs are reduced or absent in ABOi KTxR which we propose leads to less acute rejection and better long term function following ABOi KTx.Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Outcomes Using Grafts from Donors after Cardiac Death. - Journal of the American College of Surgeons
Previous reports suggest that donation after cardiac death (DCD) liver grafts have increased primary nonfunction (PNF) and cholangiopathy thought to be due to the graft warm ischemia before cold flushing.In this single-center, retrospective study, 866 adult liver transplantations were performed at our institution from January 2005 to August 2014. Forty-nine (5.7%) patients received DCD donor grafts. The 49 DCD graft recipients were compared with all recipients of donation after brain death donor (DBD) grafts and to a donor and recipient age- and size-matched cohort.The DCD donors were younger (age 28, range 8 to 60 years) than non-DCD (age 44.3, range 9 to 80 years) (p < 0.0001), with similar recipient age. The mean laboratory Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) was lower in DCD recipients (18.7 vs 22.2, p = 0.03). Mean cold and warm ischemia times were similar. Median ICU and hospital stay were 2 days and 7.5 days in both groups (p = 0.37). Median follow-ups were 4.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. Long-term outcomes were similar between groups, with similar 1-, 3- and 5-year patient and graft survivals (p = 0.59). Four (8.5%) recipients developed ischemic cholangiopathy (IC) at 2, 3, 6, and 8 months. Primary nonfunction and hepatic artery thrombosis did not occur in any patient in the DCD group. Acute kidney injury was more common with DCD grafts (16.3% of DCD recipients required dialysis vs 4.1% of DBD recipients, p = 0.01). An increased donor age (>40 years) was shown to increase the risk of IC (p = 0.006).Careful selection of DCD donors can provide suitable donors, with results of liver transplantation comparable to those with standard brain dead donors.Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
The Effect of State Policies on Organ Donation and Transplantation in the United States. - JAMA internal medicine
Shortages in transplantable solid organs remain a critical public health challenge in the United States. During the past 2 decades, all states have implemented policies to increase organ supply, although their effectiveness is unknown.To determine the effects on organ donation and transplantation rates of state policies to provide incentives for volunteer donation.Using a quasi-experimental design and difference-in-differences regression analyses, we estimated the effect of policies in all 50 states and the District of Columbia on organ donors per capita and the number of transplantations from January 1, 1988, to December 31, 2010. Analyses were also stratified by type of donor (living vs deceased). Data were derived from the United Network for Organ Sharing. All data collection occurred between July 7 and September 27, 2013.Policies of interest were the presence of first-person consent laws, donor registries, dedicated revenue streams for donor recruitment activities, population education programs, paid leave for donation, and tax incentives. Information on states' passage of various policies was obtained from primary legislative and legal sources.The number of organ donors and transplantations per state, per year, during the study period.From 1988 to 2010, the number of states passing at least 1 donation-related policy increased from 7 (14%) to 50 (100%). First-person consent laws, donor registries, public education, paid leave, and tax incentives had no robust, significant association with either donation rates or number of transplants. The establishment of revenue policies, in which individuals contribute to a protected state fund for donation promotion activities, was associated with a 5.3% increase in the absolute number of transplants (95% CI, 0.57%-10.1%; P = .03). These associations were driven by a 4.9% increase in organ donations (95% CI, 0.97%-8.7%; P = .01) and an 8.0% increase in transplants (95% CI, 3.1%-12.9%; P = .001) from deceased donors as opposed to changes among living donors or transplants from living donors.Nearly all state-level policies to encourage organ donation have had no observable effect on the rate of organ donation and transplantation in the United States. The one exception was the establishment of revenue policies to promote organ donation, which may have led to small increases in organ donations and transplantations from deceased donors. New policy designs are needed to increase donation rates and curtail the widening gap between organ supply and demand.
Donor Age-Based Analysis of Liver Transplantation Outcomes: Short- and Long-Term Outcomes Are Similar Regardless of Donor Age. - Journal of the American College of Surgeons
The shortage of donor organs has led to increasing use of extended criteria donors, including older donors. The upper limit of donor age that produces acceptable outcomes continues to be explored. In liver transplantation, with appropriate selection, graft survival and patient outcomes would be comparable regardless of age.We performed a retrospective analysis of 1,036 adult orthotopic liver transplantations (OLT) from a prospectively maintained database performed between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2013. The study focus group was liver transplantations performed using grafts from older (older than 60 years) deceased donors. Deceased donor liver transplantations done during the same time period using grafts from younger donors (younger than 60 years) were analyzed for comparison. Both groups were further divided based on recipient age (less than 60 years and 60 years or older). Donor age was the primary variable. Recipient variables included were demographics, indication for transplantation, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD), graft survival, and patient survival. Operative details and postoperative complications were analyzed.Patient demographics and perioperative details were similar between groups. Patient and graft survival rates were similar in the 4 groups. Rates of rejection (p = 0.07), bile leak (p = 0.17), and hepatic artery thrombosis were comparable across all groups (p = 0.84). Hepatitis C virus recurrence was similar across all groups (p = 0.10). Thirty-one young recipients (less than 60 years) received grafts from donors aged 70 or older. Their survival and other complication rates were comparable to those in the young donor to young recipient group.Comparable outcomes in graft and patient survivals were achieved using older donors (60 years or more), regardless of recipient age, without increased rate of complications.Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Morbid obesity in liver transplant recipients adversely affects longterm graft and patient survival in a single-institution analysis. - HPB : the official journal of the International Hepato Pancreato Biliary Association
The effects of obesity in liver transplantation remain controversial. Earlier institutional data demonstrated no significant difference in postoperative complications or 1-year mortality. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that obesity alone has minimal effect on longterm graft and overall survival.A retrospective, single-institution analysis of outcomes in patients submitted to primary adult orthotopic liver transplantation was conducted using data for the period from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2012. Recipients were divided into six groups by pre-transplant body mass index (BMI), comprising those with BMIs of <18.0 kg/m(2) , 18.0-24.9 kg/m(2) , 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2) , 30.0-35.0 kg/m(2) , 35.1-40.0 kg/m(2) and >40 kg/m(2) , respectively. Pre- and post-transplant parameters were compared. A P-value of <0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. Independent predictors of patient and graft survival were determined using multivariate analysis.A total of 785 patients met the study inclusion criteria. A BMI of >35 kg/m(2) was associated with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) cirrhosis (P < 0.0001), higher Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, and longer wait times for transplant (P = 0.002). There were no differences in operative time, intensive care unit or hospital length of stay, or perioperative complications. Graft and patient survival at intervals up to 3 years were similar between groups. Compared with non-obese recipients, recipients with a BMI of >40 kg/m(2) showed significantly reduced 5-year graft (49.0% versus 75.8%; P < 0.02) and patient (51.3% versus 78.8%; P < 0.01) survival.Obesity increasingly impacts outcomes in liver transplantation. Although the present data are limited by the fact that they were sourced from a single institution, they suggest that morbid obesity adversely affects longterm outcomes despite providing similar short-term results. Further analysis is indicated to identify risk factors for poor outcomes in morbidly obese patients.© 2014 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.
Focus on mTOR inhibitors and tacrolimus in renal transplantation: pharmacokinetics, exposure-response relationships, and clinical outcomes. - Transplant immunology
Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-inhibitor-containing immunosuppressive regimens have been developed as part of calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) minimization/withdrawal strategies for renal transplant recipients, with the goal of avoiding CNI-associated nephrotoxicity. This review focuses on the pharmacokinetic interactions and exposure-response relationships of mTOR inhibitors and tacrolimus (TAC), the most widely used CNI. We also discuss key randomized clinical studies that have evaluated use of this combination in renal transplantation. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown that mTOR inhibitors, everolimus (EVR) and sirolimus (SRL), have a large intra- and inter-patient variability in drug exposure, and narrow therapeutic windows (trough levels [C0] 3-8 ng/mL and 5-15 ng/mL, respectively). Consequently, routine therapeutic drug monitoring of EVR and SRL is recommended to optimize efficacy and minimize toxicity in individual patients. As there is a good correlation between C0 and area under the curve (AUC), C0 can be used as a convenient and reliable measure of mTOR drug exposure. Clinical data on the use of EVR or SRL in TAC minimization strategies in renal transplantation are limited. Available evidence suggests that treatment with EVR allows early and substantial TAC minimization when used with basiliximab induction and corticosteroids, to achieve good renal function without compromising efficacy or safety. However, data comparing this combination with other regimens are lacking. Results with SRL are more mixed. SRL in combination with reduced TAC has been shown to provide less nephrotoxicity than the SRL/standard TAC combination, with comparable efficacy and safety. However, this approach has been shown to be inferior to other regimens in terms of patient/graft survival and biopsy-proven acute rejection (vs MMF/TAC) as well as renal function (vs MMF/TAC and SRL/MMF). Further studies are needed to define the therapeutic window for TAC when used in combination with mTOR inhibitors, evaluate EVR/reduced TAC versus other regimens, assess long-term outcomes, and determine efficacy and safety in high-risk patients.Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Strategies for the management of adverse events associated with mTOR inhibitors. - Transplantation reviews (Orlando, Fla.)
Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are used as potent immunosuppressive agents in solid-organ transplant recipients (everolimus and sirolimus) and as antineoplastic therapies for various cancers (eg, advanced renal cell carcinoma; everolimus, temsirolimus, ridaforolimus). Relevant literature, obtained from specific PubMed searches, was reviewed to evaluate the incidence and mechanistic features of specific adverse events (AEs) associated with mTOR inhibitor treatment, and to present strategies to effectively manage these events. The AEs examined in this review include stomatitis and other cutaneous AEs, wound-healing complications (eg, lymphocele, incisional hernia), diabetes/hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, proteinuria, nephrotoxicity, delayed graft function, pneumonitis, anemia, hypertension, gonadal dysfunction, and ovarian toxicity. Strategies for selecting appropriate patients for mTOR inhibitor therapy and minimizing the risks of AEs are discussed, along with best practices for identifying and managing side effects. mTOR inhibitors are promising therapeutic options in immunosuppression and oncology; most AEs can be effectively detected and managed or reversed with careful monitoring and appropriate interventions.Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Organ allocation in pediatric renal transplants: is there an optimal donor? - Clinical transplantation
The 2005 revised allocation scheme for pediatric renal transplantation made the decision of whether to transplant an available living-donor (LD) kidney or use a deceased-donor (DD) kidney controversial. The aim of this study was to examine kidney allograft utilization, sensitization, and outcomes of pediatric transplant recipients. Between January 2000 and December 2009, 91 consecutive pediatric kidney recipients (<20 yr) were transplanted. The LD (n = 38) and DD (n = 53) groups were similar in age, gender, dialysis status at transplant, warm ischemia time, and overall patient survival. LD recipients were more likely to be Caucasian (92 vs. 69%), receive older allografts (39 ± 10 vs. 23 ± 9 yr), and have fewer human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches (3.3 ± 1.6 vs. 4.4 ± 1.5, p < 0.01 for all). Graft survival at one, three, and five yr post-transplant was longer for LD recipients (97%, 91%, 87% vs. DD 89%, 79%, 58%, respectively, p < 0.05). At the time of transplant, 17 (33%) DD recipients had an available LD (mean age 40 yr). A greater proportion of all patients were moderately (PRA 21-79%) sensitized post-transplant (p < 0.05). A multivariable analysis of graft survival indicated that the advantage in LD organs was likely due to fewer HLA mismatched in this group. Nonetheless, LD organs appear to provide optimal outcomes in pediatric renal transplants when considering the risk of becoming sensitized post-transplant complicating later use of the LD kidney.© 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Interplay between immune responses to HLA and non-HLA self-antigens in allograft rejection. - Human immunology
Recent studies strongly suggest an increasing role for immune responses against self-antigens (Ags) which are not encoded by the major histocompatibility complex in the immunopathogenesis of allograft rejection. Although, improved surgical techniques coupled with improved methods to detect and avoid sensitization against donor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) have improved the immediate and short term function of transplanted organs. However, acute and chronic rejection still remains a vexing problem for the long term function of the transplanted organ. Immediately following organ transplantation, several factors both immune and non immune mechanisms lead to the development of local inflammatory milieu which sets the stage for allograft rejection. Traditionally, development of antibodies (Abs) against mismatched donor HLA have been implicated in the development of Ab mediated rejection. However, recent studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that development of humoral and cellular immune responses against non-HLA self-Ags may contribute in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection. There are reports demonstrating that immune responses to self-Ags especially Abs to the self-Ags as well as cellular immune responses especially through IL17 has significant pro-fibrotic properties leading to chronic allograft failure. This review summarizes recent studies demonstrating the role for immune responses to self-Ags in allograft immunity leading to rejection as well as present recent evidence suggesting there is interplay between allo- and autoimmunity leading to allograft dysfunction.Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Map & Directions

1 Barnes Jewish Hospital Plz Saint Louis, MO 63110
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