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Dr. Min  Cha  Md image

Dr. Min Cha Md

3185 Rt 27
Franklin Park NJ 08823
732 224-4889
Medical School: Umdnj-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School - 1992
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 25MA06437800
NPI: 1124113535
Taxonomy Codes:
207P00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Min Cha is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:12002 Description:Repair superficial wound(s) Average Price:$216.04 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$124.73
HCPCS Code:96365 Description:Ther/proph/diag iv inf init Average Price:$107.82 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$83.98
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$131.84 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$116.03
HCPCS Code:71020 Description:Chest x-ray Average Price:$49.72 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$35.22
HCPCS Code:93000 Description:Electrocardiogram complete Average Price:$34.42 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$21.47
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$127.17 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$114.64
HCPCS Code:73030 Description:X-ray exam of shoulder Average Price:$48.02 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$36.12
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$89.48 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$77.75
HCPCS Code:99212 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$58.68 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$47.47
HCPCS Code:69210 Description:Remove impacted ear wax Average Price:$67.39 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$57.09
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$182.93 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$174.01
HCPCS Code:81000 Description:Urinalysis nonauto w/scope Average Price:$12.74 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$4.48
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$161.67 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$153.49
HCPCS Code:90656 Description:Flu vaccine no preserv 3 & > Average Price:$20.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.39
HCPCS Code:87880 Description:Strep a assay w/optic Average Price:$22.94 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$15.59
HCPCS Code:73610 Description:X-ray exam of ankle Average Price:$43.55 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$38.28
HCPCS Code:90714 Description:Td vaccine no prsrv >/= 7 im Average Price:$24.45 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$19.39
HCPCS Code:80048 Description:Metabolic panel total ca Average Price:$16.97 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.98
HCPCS Code:73630 Description:X-ray exam of foot Average Price:$41.36 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$36.75
HCPCS Code:73562 Description:X-ray exam of knee 3 Average Price:$44.35 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$41.63
HCPCS Code:85025 Description:Complete cbc w/auto diff wbc Average Price:$13.58 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.02
HCPCS Code:90471 Description:Immunization admin Average Price:$30.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$27.51
HCPCS Code:96372 Description:Ther/proph/diag inj sc/im Average Price:$30.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$27.51
HCPCS Code:73110 Description:X-ray exam of wrist Average Price:$43.91 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$41.59
HCPCS Code:G0008 Description:Admin influenza virus vac Average Price:$30.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$27.79
HCPCS Code:36415 Description:Routine venipuncture Average Price:$5.11 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.00
HCPCS Code:J7613 Description:Albuterol non-comp unit Average Price:$0.81 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$0.06

HCPCS Code Definitions

J7613
Albuterol, inhalation solution, fda-approved final product, non-compounded, administered through dme, unit dose, 1 mg
G0008
Administration of influenza virus vaccine
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
90471
Immunization administration (includes percutaneous, intradermal, subcutaneous, or intramuscular injections); 1 vaccine (single or combination vaccine/toxoid)
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
73630
Radiologic examination, foot; complete, minimum of 3 views
73030
Radiologic examination, shoulder; complete, minimum of 2 views
73110
Radiologic examination, wrist; complete, minimum of 3 views
73610
Radiologic examination, ankle; complete, minimum of 3 views
73562
Radiologic examination, knee; 3 views
93000
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; with interpretation and report
12002
Simple repair of superficial wounds of scalp, neck, axillae, external genitalia, trunk and/or extremities (including hands and feet); 2.6 cm to 7.5 cm
69210
Removal impacted cerumen requiring instrumentation, unilateral
71020
Radiologic examination, chest, 2 views, frontal and lateral
96372
Therapeutic, prophylactic, or diagnostic injection (specify substance or drug); subcutaneous or intramuscular
96365
Intravenous infusion, for therapy, prophylaxis, or diagnosis (specify substance or drug); initial, up to 1 hour
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99212
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused history; A problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are self limited or minor. Typically, 10 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1437244852
Emergency Medicine
943
1548266125
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
457
1245269083
Emergency Medicine
345
1336223080
Internal Medicine
244
1841286697
Pulmonary Disease
238
1396804712
Internal Medicine
216
1295808889
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
200
1942393012
General Surgery
197
1235111584
Diagnostic Radiology
172
1497852966
Geriatric Medicine
170
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Cha has made to other doctors

Publications

Comparison of the microbiological characteristics and virulence factors of ST131 and non-ST131 clones among extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli causing bacteremia. - Diagnostic microbiology and infectious disease
We evaluated the molecular epidemiology and microbiological characteristics of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) isolates that cause bacteremia in Korean hospitals, focusing especially on ST131. Our data suggest that ST131 isolates possessed more virulence traits and showed more multidrug resistance patterns than non-ST131 isolates. Among CTX-M-15 producers, the frequency of serum resistance was significantly higher in ST131 than in non-ST131. As in other parts of the world, the ESBL-EC ST131 clone has emerged and disseminated in both community and hospital settings in Korea, including in blood isolates in patients with bacteremia.Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Compressible and monolithic microporous polymer sponges prepared via one-pot synthesis. - Scientific reports
Compressible and monolithic microporous polymers (MPs) are reported. MPs were prepared as monoliths via a Sonogashira-Hagihara coupling reaction of 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene (TEB) with the bis(bromothiophene) monomer (PBT-Br). The polymers were reversibly compressible, and were easily cut into any form using a knife. Microscopy studies on the MPs revealed that the polymers had tubular microstructures, resembling those often found in marine sponges. Under compression, elastic buckling of the tube bundles was observed using an optical microscope. MP-0.8, which was synthesized using a 0.8:1 molar ratio of PBT-Br to TEB, showed microporosity with a BET surface area as high as 463 m(2)g(-1). The polymer was very hydrophobic, with a water contact angle of 145° and absorbed 7-17 times its own weight of organic liquids. The absorbates were released by simple compression, allowing recyclable use of the polymer. MPs are potential precursors of structured carbon materials; for example, a partially graphitic material was obtained by pyrolysis of MP-0.8, which showed a similar tubular structure to that of MP-0.8.
In vitro activities of 21 antimicrobial agents alone and in combination with aminoglycosides or fluoroquinolones against extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolates causing bacteremia. - Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
We evaluated the in vitro activity of various antimicrobials alone and in combination against 291 extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) isolates causing bacteremia in South Korean hospitals. Ceftazidime, cefepime, and piperacillin-tazobactam in combination with amikacin showed greater activity than found in combination with ciprofloxacin. In settings with a high prevalence of ESBL-producing pathogens, combination aminoglycoside antimicrobial therapy, especially with amikacin, may be considered for empirical therapy against suspected Gram-negative sepsis as a carbapenem-saving strategy.Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Two-Stage Total Knee Arthroplasty for Prosthetic Joint Infection. - Knee surgery & related research
This retrospective review was conducted to identify prognostic factors for two-stage reimplantation for infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and the rate of reinfection following revision TKA.Out of 88 patients diagnosed with post-TKA infection between 1998 and 2011, 76 underwent two-stage reimplantation and were reviewed in this study. The 76 patients were divided into two groups-those who experienced reinfection and those who did not. Comorbidities, culture results, and inflammation indices were analyzed and compared between the two groups.Of the 76 patients who underwent a two-stage reimplantation, 18 (23.7%) experienced reinfection. Patients with more than three comorbidities had significantly higher reinfection rates than those with less than three comorbidities (47.1% vs. 4.8%, p=0.032). The reinfection rate between the culture positive prosthetic joint infection group and the culture negative prosthetic joint infection group was not significantly different (p=0.056). Inflammation indices (erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR] and C-reactive protein [CRP]) showed a statistically significant difference between patients with reinfection and those without reinfection at 4 weeks after the first-stage surgery.Reimplantation must be carefully performed when the risk of reinfection is high, particularly in patients with more than three systemic or local comorbidities and higher inflammation indices (ESR and CRP) prior to revision TKA.
Metabolomic analysis of clinical plasma from cerebral infarction patients presenting with blood stasis. - Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM
Blood stasis (BS) is characterized as a disorder of blood circulation. In traditional Korean medicine (TKM), it is viewed as a cause factor of diseases such as multiple sclerosis and stroke. This study investigated differences in the plasma metabolites profiles of subjects displaying BS or non-BS patterns. Thirty-one patients with cerebral infarction diagnosed with BS and an equal number of sex- and age-matched non-BS patients were enrolled. Metabolic profiling was performed using UPLC-MS. The ratio of subjects with a rough pulse and purple coloration of the tongue was higher in patients presenting with BS pattern. Through metabolomics analysis, 82 metabolites that differed significantly between the BS and non-BS pattern were identified, and the two groups were significantly separated using an orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis model (P < 0.001). Of these 82 metabolites, acetyl carnitine, leucine, kynurenine, phosphocholine, hexanoyl carnitine, and decanoyl carnitine were present in significantly higher levels in patients with a BS pattern than those with a non-BS pattern. Our results also demonstrated that seven plasma metabolites, including acyl-carnitines and kynurenine, were associated with a BS pattern, suggesting that variant plasma metabolic profiles may serve as a biomarker for diagnosis of BS in patients with cerebral infarction.
Clinical Features and Treatment Outcomes of Bloodstream Infections Caused by Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131. - Microbial drug resistance (Larchmont, N.Y.)
Despite the remarkable emergence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131), the clinical features and outcomes of infections caused by ST131 remain poorly described. From 2011 to 2012, we collected ESBL-producing E. coli isolates from patients with bloodstream infections in 13 hospitals in Korea and compared clinical characteristics and outcomes between ST131 and non-ST131 clones. Of the 110 ESBL-producing isolates, the most common ST was ST131 (30.9%). Multivariate analysis showed that recent operation was the only variable associated with the ST131 clone; other comorbid conditions and clinical features were similar between ST131 and non-ST131 clones. CTX-M-14 and CTX-M-15 were the predominant types of ESBLs, and CTX-M-15 was significantly associated with ST131. The rate of nonsusceptibility to ciprofloxacin was higher in ST131 than in non-ST131 clones (94.1% vs. 75.0%). No significant differences in 30-day mortality rates were found between ST131 and non-ST131 clones. Multivariate analysis revealed that older age (odds ratio [OR]=5.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22-23.89; p=0.027), nosocomial infection (OR=4.81, 95% CI 1.15-20.15; p=0.032), and higher Pitt bacteremia score (OR=7.26, 95% CI 1.41-37.42; p=0.018) were independent risk factors for 30-day mortality. The ESBL-producing E. coli ST131 clone has emerged and disseminated in Korea. Our findings reveal similarities in clinical and demographic characteristics between ST131 and non-ST131 clones. Although a more resistant profile has been detected in ST131, patients with the ST131 clone did not exhibit a higher mortality rate.
Clinical impact of minimal micropapillary pattern in invasive lung adenocarcinoma: prognostic significance and survival outcomes. - The American journal of surgical pathology
Micropapillary subtype has recently been established to be a distinct marker for poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinomas. According to the current classification of lung adenocarcinomas, all subtypes are listed semiquantitatively in 5% increments. In other words, a minimal amount of the micropapillary pattern, precisely <5% of the entire tumor is disregarded. Therefore, we sought to assess the prognostic significance and survival outcomes in patients with a micropapillary pattern proportion of <5% of the entire tumor. A total of 525 patients with lung adenocarcinoma were classified into 3 subgroups according to the presence and proportion of micropapillary subtype: (1) ≥5% of the micropapillary pattern (n=114); (2) <5% of the micropapillary pattern (n=115); and (3) absence (<1%) of the micropapillary pattern (n=296). Sex, TNM stage, lymph node status (N status), tumor size, and predominant subtype demonstrated a significant difference among the 3 subgroups. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were significantly different among the 3 subgroups (P=0.009 and 0.001 for OS and DFS, respectively). Furthermore, OS was significantly better in patients without the micropapillary pattern (<1%) than in those with <5% (P=0.034). At multivariate analyses, age (P=0.005) and N status (P=0.005) were independent prognostic factors influencing OS. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that even a small proportion of the micropapillary pattern, specifically <5% of the entire tumor has a significant prognostic impact on OS. N status remained an independent prognostic factor that negatively influenced OS.
Extended-spectrum cephalosporins and the inoculum effect in tests with CTX-M-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli: potential clinical implications of the revised CLSI interpretive criteria. - International journal of antimicrobial agents
Based on the new recommendations of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), the revised cephalosporin breakpoints may result in many CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli being reported as susceptible to ceftazidime. We determined the activity of ceftazidime and other parenteral β-lactam agents in standard- and high-inoculum minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) tests against CTX-M-producing E. coli isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined using a broth microdilution MIC method with inocula that differed 100-fold in density. An inoculum effect was defined as an eight-fold or greater increase in MIC on testing with the higher inoculum. When the revised CLSI ceftazidime breakpoint of 4 μg/mL was applied, 34 (34.3%) of the 99 CTX-M-producers tested were susceptible. More specifically, for 42 CTX-M-14-producing E. coli isolates, 32 (76.2%) were susceptible at 4 μg/mL. Cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefepime and piperacillin/tazobactam were found to be associated with inoculum effects in 100% of the evaluable tests for extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli isolates. The MIC(50) (MIC required to inhibit 50% of isolates) of ceftazidime was 16 μg/mL in the standard-inoculum tests and >512 μg/mL in the high-inoculum tests. In the high-inoculum tests including isolates encoding CTX-M-14, ceftazidime was dramatically affected, with susceptibility decreasing from 82.1% of isolates inhibited at 4 μg/mL in the standard-inoculum tests to 0% at high inoculum. Although further studies may demonstrate that ceftazidime has a role in the treatment of infections caused by these organisms, we suggest that until more data become available, clinicians should be cautious about treating serious CTX-M-producing E. coli infections with ceftazidime or cefepime.Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.
Micropapillary and solid subtypes of invasive lung adenocarcinoma: clinical predictors of histopathology and outcome. - The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery
To evaluate the clinical effect of the presence of a micropapillary or solid subtype on the outcomes in lung adenocarcinoma and to determine the predictors of such a histopathologic diagnosis.A total of 511 patients with lung adenocarcinoma ≤3 cm were included. According to the presence of micropapillary or solid subtypes, we classified the patients into 4 subgroups: both subtypes absent (MP-/S-, n = 87), either subtype present (MP+/S-, n = 207 and MP-/S+, n = 196), and both present (MP+/S+, n = 21) to determine the association between the micropapillary or solid subtype and survival outcome or clinical and imaging conditions. Univariate and multivariate analyses were undertaken to determine the parameters, allowing the prediction of the presence of the micropapillary or solid subtype.Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) differed significantly among the 4 subgroups (P < .001 and P = .004, respectively). The MP-/S- tumors showed better DFS than those containing either the micropapillary or solid subtype. Patients with the micropapillary subtype had significantly worse OS than patients without the micropapillary subtype. This difference remained significant, together with stage, after adjustment for gender, age, adjuvant therapy, tumor size, and solid subtype (DFS and OS, P = .016 and P = .002, respectively). On multivariate analysis, greater than stage I, tumor size ≥2.5 cm, solid mass, and maximal standardized uptake value of ≥7 were independent predictors of the presence of a micropapillary or solid subtype.Micropapillary and solid subtypes are common in tumors greater than stage I, with size ≥2.5 cm, pure solid type, and maximal standardized uptake value of ≥7, which were predictors for poor DFS. The presence of the micropapillary subtype was a single prognostic factor for OS.Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
Epidemiology and clinical outcomes of bloodstream infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in patients with cancer. - International journal of antimicrobial agents
Patients with cancer can be vulnerable to infection with antimicrobial-resistant pathogens such as extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. A cohort study was performed to evaluate the epidemiology and impact of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) bacteraemia on the outcomes of adult patients with cancer. During the 2.5-year study period, a total of 350 cases of E. coli bacteraemia were documented in cancer patients, of which 95 (27.1%) were due to ESBL-EC. Significant factors associated with ESBL-EC bacteraemia were liver disease, immunosuppressant use, recent surgery, and prior use of cephalosporins or fluoroquinolones. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 14.9% (52/350), and the mortality rate was higher in patients with ESBL-EC than in those without ESBL-EC (22.1% vs.12.2%; P=0.02). Multivariate analysis showed that ESBL-EC was an independent risk factor for mortality (odds ratio=3.01, 95% confidence interval 1.45-6.28; P=0.003), along with the presence of septic shock, mechanical ventilation, the severity of underlying diseases, and pneumonia as a source of bacteraemia. Of the 69 isolates in which ESBLs and their molecular relationships were studied, 68 (98.6%) produced CTX-M-type and 51 (73.9%) produced CTX-M-14 and/or CTX-M-15. Twenty-four sequence types (STs) were identified among CTX-M-14- and CTX-M-15-producing E. coli isolates, with ST131 being the most prevalent (12/51; 23.5%). In conclusion, this study confirms that CTX-M-producing E. coli and ST131, which have been shown to be an emerging public health threat, are widely prevalent in cancer patients and can adversely affect the outcome of E. coli bacteraemia in these patients.Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

Map & Directions

3185 Rt 27 Franklin Park, NJ 08823
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