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Dr. Carla  Dicenzo-Flynn  Md image

Dr. Carla Dicenzo-Flynn Md

4 Perry St
Morristown NJ 07960
973 401-1000
Medical School: Other - 1989
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: MA070526
NPI: 1114942075
Taxonomy Codes:
207R00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Carla Dicenzo-Flynn is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$330.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$209.55
HCPCS Code:99205 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$275.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$217.74
HCPCS Code:99310 Description:Nursing fac care subseq Average Price:$175.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$139.56
HCPCS Code:99231 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$60.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$40.89
HCPCS Code:99233 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$121.14 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$107.36
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$80.47 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$74.89
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$150.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$150.00

HCPCS Code Definitions

99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99233
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99205
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 60 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99231
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused interval history; A problem focused examination; Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is stable, recovering or improving. Typically, 15 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99310
Subsequent nursing facility care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive interval history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. The patient may be unstable or may have developed a significant new problem requiring immediate physician attention. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's facility floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1336264282
Internal Medicine
5,351
1376588558
Family Practice
5,189
1184690190
Infectious Disease
4,240
1699872788
Diagnostic Radiology
4,062
1871526632
Internal Medicine
3,806
1598862617
Diagnostic Radiology
3,687
1568497824
Internal Medicine
3,457
1710077573
Diagnostic Radiology
3,396
1194815977
Diagnostic Radiology
3,306
1710903497
Infectious Disease
3,136
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Dicenzo-Flynn has made to other doctors

Publications

In situ studies of NO reduction by H2 over Pt using surface X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. - Physical chemistry chemical physics : PCCP
In situ surface X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy at 1 bar show massive material transport of platinum during high-temperature NO reduction with H2. A Pt(110) single-crystal surface shows a wide variety of surface reconstructions and extensive faceting of the surface. Pt nanoparticles change their morphology depending on the gas composition: They are faceted in hydrogen-rich environments, but are more spherical in NO-rich environments, indicating the formation of vicinal surfaces. We conclude that high coverage of NO combined with sufficient mobility of platinum surface atoms is the driving force for the formation of steps on both flat surfaces and nanoparticles. Since the steps that are introduced provide strongly coordinating adsorption sites with potential catalytic benefits, this may be of direct practical relevance for the performance of catalytic nanoparticles under high-pressure conditions.
Structural Reorganization of Pt(111) Electrodes by Electrochemical Oxidation and Reduction. - Journal of the American Chemical Society
The surface restructuring of Pt(111) electrodes upon electrochemical oxidation/reduction in 0.1 M HClO4 was studied by in situ grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and complementary scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. These methods allow quantitative determination of the formation and structural evolution of nanoscale Pt islands during potential cycles into the oxidation region. A characteristic ripening behavior is observed, where these islands become more prominent and homogeneous in size with increasing number of cycles. Their characteristic lateral dimensions primarily depend on the upper potential limit of the cycle and only slightly increase with cycle number. The structural evolution of the Pt surface morphology strongly resembles that found in studies of Pt(111) homoepitaxial growth and ion erosion in ultrahigh vacuum. It can be fully explained by a microscopic model based on the known surface dynamic behavior under vacuum conditions, indicating that the same dynamics also describe the structural evolution of Pt in the electrochemical environment.
Controlling the growth of Bi(110) and Bi(111) films on an insulating substrate. - Nanotechnology
We demonstrate the controlled growth of Bi(110) and Bi(111) films on an α-Al2O3(0001) substrate by surface x-ray diffraction and x-ray reflectivity using synchrotron radiation. At temperatures as low as 40 K, unanticipated pseudo-cubic Bi(110) films are grown with thicknesses ranging from a few to tens of nanometers. The roughness at the film-vacuum as well as the film-substrate interface, can be reduced by mild heating, where a crystallographic orientation transition of Bi(110) towards Bi(111) is observed at 400 K. From 450 K onwards high quality ultrasmooth Bi(111) films form. Growth around the transition temperature results in the growth of competing Bi(110) and Bi(111) domains.
Influence of C60 co-deposition on the growth kinetics of diindenoperylene-From rapid roughening to layer-by-layer growth in blended organic films. - The Journal of chemical physics
We investigated the growth of the two phase-separating materials diindenoperylene (DIP) and buckminsterfullerene C60 with different mixing ratio in real-time and in situ by X-ray scattering experiments. We found that at room temperature, mixtures with an excess of DIP show a growth mode which is very close to the perfect layer-by-layer limit with DIP crystallites forming over the entire film thickness. An unexpected increase in the island size is observed for these mixtures as a function of film thickness. On the other hand, equimolar and C60 dominated mixtures grow with poor crystallinity but form very smooth films. Additionally, it is observed that higher substrate temperatures lead to an increase in the length scale of phase separation with film thickness.
Structure and Nanomechanics of Model Membranes by Atomic Force Microscopy and Spectroscopy: Insights into the Role of Cholesterol and Sphingolipids. - Membranes
Biological membranes mediate several biological processes that are directly associated with their physical properties but sometimes difficult to evaluate. Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are model systems widely used to characterize the structure of biological membranes. Cholesterol (Chol) plays an essential role in the modulation of membrane physical properties. It directly influences the order and mechanical stability of the lipid bilayers, and it is known to laterally segregate in rafts in the outer leaflet of the membrane together with sphingolipids (SLs). Atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool as it is capable to sense and apply forces with high accuracy, with distance and force resolution at the nanoscale, and in a controlled environment. AFM-based force spectroscopy (AFM-FS) has become a crucial technique to study the nanomechanical stability of SLBs by controlling the liquid media and the temperature variations. In this contribution, we review recent AFM and AFM-FS studies on the effect of Chol on the morphology and mechanical properties of model SLBs, including complex bilayers containing SLs. We also introduce a promising combination of AFM and X-ray (XR) techniques that allows for in situ characterization of dynamic processes, providing structural, morphological, and nanomechanical information.
Combined scanning probe microscopy and x-ray scattering instrument for in situ catalysis investigations. - The Review of scientific instruments
We have developed a new instrument combining a scanning probe microscope (SPM) and an X-ray scattering platform for ambient-pressure catalysis studies. The two instruments are integrated with a flow reactor and an ultra-high vacuum system that can be mounted easily on the diffractometer at a synchrotron end station. This makes it possible to perform SPM and X-ray scattering experiments in the same instrument under identical conditions that are relevant for catalysis.
Adult female acne and associated risk factors: Results of a multicenter case-control study in Italy. - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
The reasons for the appearance of acne in adulthood are largely unknown.We explored the role of personal and environmental factors in adult female acne.We conducted a multicenter case-control study in the outpatient departments of 12 Italian cities. Cases (n = 248) were consecutive women ≥25 years of age with newly diagnosed acne of any grade. Controls (n = 270) were females diagnosed with conditions other than acne.In multivariate analysis, a history of acne in parents (odds ratio [OR] = 3.02) or siblings (OR = 2.40), history of acne during adolescence (OR = 5.44), having no previous pregnancies (OR = 1.71), having hirsutism (OR = 3.50), being an office worker versus being unemployed or being a housewife (OR = 2.24), and having a high level of reported psychological stress (OR = 2.95) were all associated with acne. A low weekly intake of fruits or vegetables (OR = 2.33) and low consumption of fresh fish (OR = 2.76) were also associated with acne.We did not establish an onset date for acne. Some of our associations may reflect consequences of established acne.Lifestyle factors may play an important role for acne development in adulthood, but their role should be further assessed in prospective studies.Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Comparison Between Doppler-Echocardiography and Uncalibrated Pulse Contour Method for Cardiac Output Measurement: A Multicenter Observational Study. - Critical care medicine
Echocardiography and pulse contour methods allow, respectively, noninvasive and less invasive cardiac output estimation. The aim of the present study was to compare Doppler echocardiography with the pulse contour method MostCare for cardiac output estimation in a large and nonselected critically ill population.A prospective multicenter observational comparison study.The study was conducted in 15 European medicosurgical ICUs.We assessed cardiac output in 400 patients in whom an echocardiographic evaluation was performed as a routine need or for cardiocirculatory assessment.None.One echocardiographic cardiac output measurement was compared with the corresponding MostCare cardiac output value per patient, considering different ICU admission categories and clinical conditions. For statistical analysis, we used Bland-Altman and linear regression analyses. To assess heterogeneity in results of individual centers, Cochran Q, and the I statistics were applied. A total of 400 paired echocardiographic cardiac output and MostCare cardiac output measures were compared. MostCare cardiac output values ranged from 1.95 to 9.90 L/min, and echocardiographic cardiac output ranged from 1.82 to 9.75 L/min. A significant correlation was found between echocardiographic cardiac output and MostCare cardiac output (r = 0.85; p < 0.0001). Among the different ICUs, the mean bias between echocardiographic cardiac output and MostCare cardiac output ranged from -0.40 to 0.45 L/min, and the percentage error ranged from 13.2% to 47.2%. Overall, the mean bias was -0.03 L/min, with 95% limits of agreement of -1.54 to 1.47 L/min and a relative percentage error of 30.1%. The percentage error was 24% in the sepsis category, 26% in the trauma category, 30% in the surgical category, and 33% in the medical admission category. The final overall percentage error was 27.3% with a 95% CI of 22.2-32.4%.Our results suggest that MostCare could be an alternative to echocardiography to assess cardiac output in ICU patients with a large spectrum of clinical conditions.
Accuracy of EASI 12-lead ECGs in monitoring ST-segment and J-point by nurses in the Coronary Care Units. - Journal of clinical nursing
To confirm the accuracy of the EASI system compared to the standard 12-lead electrocardiogram, which is the gold standard, in monitoring the two major parameters used in the Coronary Care Units to detect myocardial ischaemia: ST-segment and J-point.Continuous electrocardiograph monitoring is used in the Coronary Care Units to detect cardiac conduction abnormalities and to show the morphology of electrocardiographic waves and tracts. Its accuracy is essential for efficient nursing vigilance, particularly for monitoring the ST segment and the J-point, in which alterations may indicate the onset of myocardial ischaemia.An observational study was conducted.The enrolled patients (n = 253) simultaneously underwent standard electrocardiogram (10 electrodes) and EASI electrocardiogram (five electrodes). Data were collected by the Coronary Care Units nurses. Tests to compare differences in means and medians between the two sets of measurements were performed, and the Bland-Altman plots were used to illustrate their agreement.All 6·072 electrocardiographic leads (3·036 standard and 3·036 EASI) were recorded and analysed. Between the two measurement methods, very small statistically significant differences were found in some leads which are not clinically relevant for both the ST-segment or the J-point.This study confirms that the accuracy of the EASI 12-leadelectrocardiogram, compared to the standard 12-leadelectrocardiogram, which is the gold standard, is acceptable for clinical practice to monitor the two major parameters used in the Coronary Care Units for detecting myocardial ischaemia: ST-segment and J-point.The EASI system ensures: (1) ease of use and comfort for patients admitted to Coronary Care Units because it only requires five electrodes; (2) increased efficacy of nursing vigilance in the early detection of changes in ST-segment and J- point measurements.© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
A capacitive probe for Electron Spin Resonance detection. - Journal of magnetic resonance (San Diego, Calif. : 1997)
The use of the magnetic field associated with Maxwell displacement current in a capacitor is proposed for the detection of Electron Spin Resonance. A probe based on this concept is realized and successfully tested with CW radio-frequency in the band going from 200MHz to 1GHz with a DPPH sample. A significant increase of Signal to Noise Ratio is observed while increasing the frequency.Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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4 Perry St Morristown, NJ 07960
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