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Dr. Allen  Jones  Md image

Dr. Allen Jones Md

1200 Westwood Dr
Hamilton MT 59840
406 635-5101
Medical School: University Of Alabama School Of Medicine - 1992
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #:
NPI: 1114926102
Taxonomy Codes:
207Q00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Allen Jones is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$362.13 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$133.09
HCPCS Code:99305 Description:Nursing facility care init Average Price:$324.70 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$122.33
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$267.28 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$98.84
HCPCS Code:99318 Description:Annual nursing fac assessmnt Average Price:$237.50 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$88.57
HCPCS Code:96372 Description:Ther/proph/diag inj sc/im Average Price:$139.81 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$22.30
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$181.41 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$66.71
HCPCS Code:99316 Description:Nursing fac discharge day Average Price:$210.37 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$96.56
HCPCS Code:99308 Description:Nursing fac care subseq Average Price:$169.76 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$63.30
HCPCS Code:99315 Description:Nursing fac discharge day Average Price:$172.46 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$67.19
HCPCS Code:90471 Description:Immunization admin Average Price:$119.14 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$22.30
HCPCS Code:J1080 Description:Testosterone cypionat 200 MG Average Price:$61.84 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$6.29
HCPCS Code:93000 Description:Electrocardiogram complete Average Price:$68.44 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$17.73
HCPCS Code:G0008 Description:Admin influenza virus vac Average Price:$63.40 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$24.43
HCPCS Code:90656 Description:Flu vaccine no preserv 3 & > Average Price:$41.34 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.39
HCPCS Code:36415 Description:Routine venipuncture Average Price:$26.29 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.00
HCPCS Code:83037 Description:Glycosylated hb home device Average Price:$36.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$13.75
HCPCS Code:J3420 Description:Vitamin b12 injection Average Price:$13.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$0.54
HCPCS Code:81002 Description:Urinalysis nonauto w/o scope Average Price:$10.64 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.62
HCPCS Code:81000 Description:Urinalysis nonauto w/scope Average Price:$11.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$4.48
HCPCS Code:J3301 Description:Triamcinolone acet inj NOS Average Price:$6.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1.69

HCPCS Code Definitions

J3301
Injection, triamcinolone acetonide, not otherwise specified, 10 mg
J1080
Injection, testosterone cypionate, 1 cc, 200 mg
J3420
Injection, vitamin b-12 cyanocobalamin, up to 1000 mcg
99316
Nursing facility discharge day management; more than 30 minutes
99315
Nursing facility discharge day management; 30 minutes or less
99308
Subsequent nursing facility care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 15 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's facility floor or unit.
99305
Initial nursing facility care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's facility floor or unit.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
90471
Immunization administration (includes percutaneous, intradermal, subcutaneous, or intramuscular injections); 1 vaccine (single or combination vaccine/toxoid)
96372
Therapeutic, prophylactic, or diagnostic injection (specify substance or drug); subcutaneous or intramuscular
93000
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; with interpretation and report
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
G0008
Administration of influenza virus vaccine
99318
Evaluation and management of a patient involving an annual nursing facility assessment, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making that is of low to moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is stable, recovering, or improving. Typically, 30 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's facility floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1508868704
Internal Medicine
6,821
1679647267
Diagnostic Radiology
2,669
1194799338
Diagnostic Radiology
1,580
1629072699
Nephrology
1,262
1205828134
Internal Medicine
1,232
1356354500
Nephrology
1,125
1093750051
Pulmonary Disease
1,017
1417026436
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
890
1578558714
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
791
1871549204
Internal Medicine
727
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Jones has made to other doctors

Publications

Protocols of in vitro protein covalent binding studies in liver. - Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
Xenobiotics, including therapeutic agents, can produce a variety of beneficial, as well as adverse, effects in mammals. One potential source of drug-mediated toxicity stems from metabolic activation of the parent compound, typically catalyzed by one or more members of the cytochrome P450 family of enzymes. The resulting electrophile, if not quenched by low molecular weight endogenous nucleophiles, can form covalent adducts to cellular proteins, potentially resulting in enzyme inactivation, cell death, or formation of an immunogenic species. The toxicological consequences of exposure to such reactive intermediates range from mild inflammation to organ failure, anaphylaxis, and death. At Merck Research Laboratories, the potential of drug candidates to bind covalently to proteins is evaluated at the lead optimization stage of drug discovery by incubating a radiolabeled analog of the compound in question with liver microsomal preparations (under oxidative conditions) or whole cells (full cellular metabolic capability), typically derived from rat and human liver. A semi-automated method based on the Brandel Harvester technique then is used to measure the formation of covalent adducts of the test compound to liver proteins. This assay is viewed as an important component of drug discovery programs, since the findings are employed to guide specific efforts to abrogate bioactivation issues through informed structural modification of lead compounds.
Metabolism and excretion of [14C]taranabant, a cannabinoid-1 inverse agonist, in humans. - Xenobiotica; the fate of foreign compounds in biological systems
Taranabant (N-[(1S,2S)-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(3-cyanophenyl)-1-methylpropyl]-2-methyl-2-{[5-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl]oxy}propanamide or MK-0364) is an orally active inverse agonist of the cannabinoid 1 (CB-1) receptor that was under development for the management of obesity. The metabolism and excretion of taranabant were investigated following a single oral dose of 5 mg/201 μCi [14C]taranabant to six healthy male subjects. The overall excretion recovery of the administered radioactivity was nearly quantitative (∼92%), with the majority of the dose (∼87%) excreted into faeces and a much smaller fraction (∼5%) into urine. Taranabant was absorbed rapidly, with C(max) of radioactivity attained at 1-2-h postdose. The parent compound and its monohydroxylated metabolite, M1, were the major radioactive components circulating in plasma and comprised ∼12-24% and 33-42%, respectively, of the plasma radioactivity for up to 48 h. A second monohydroxylated metabolite, designated as M1a, represented ∼10-12% of the radioactivity in the 2- and 8-h postdose plasma profiles. Metabolite profiles of the faeces samples consisted mainly of the (unabsorbed) parent compound and multiple diastereomeric carboxylic acid derivatives derived from oxidation of the geminal methyl group of the parent compound and of the hydroxylated metabolite/s. These data suggest that, similar to rats and monkeys, taranabant is primarily eliminated in humans via oxidative metabolism and excretion of metabolites via the biliary/faecal route.
Metabolism and excretion of anacetrapib, a novel inhibitor of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein, in humans. - Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals
Anacetrapib is a novel cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitor being developed for the treatment of primary hypercholesterolemia and mixed dyslipidemia. The absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of anacetrapib were investigated in an open-label study in which six healthy male subjects received a single oral dose of 150 mg and 165 microCi of [(14)C]anacetrapib. Plasma, urine, and fecal samples were collected at predetermined times for up to 14 days postdose and were analyzed for total radioactivity, the parent compound, and metabolites. The majority of the administered radioactivity (87%) was eliminated by fecal excretion, with negligible amounts present in urine (0.1%). The peak level of radioactivity in plasma (approximately 2 microM equivalents of [(14)C]anacetrapib) was achieved approximately 4 h postdose. The parent compound was the major radioactive component (79-94% of total radioactivity) in both plasma and feces. Three oxidative metabolites, M1, M2, and M3, were detected in plasma and feces and were identified as the O-demethylated species (M1) and two secondary hydroxylated derivatives of M1 (M2 and M3). Each metabolite was detected at low levels, representing
Characterization of a novel calibration method for mineral density determination of dentine by X-ray micro-tomography. - The Analyst
Laboratory micro-CT systems, although limited by beam hardening effect and instability of the source, have been utilized to measure mineral density in combination with specific image processing methods. However, few attempts have been made to accurately determine mineral density profiles in dentine due to the lack of suitable calibration standards. The aim of this study was to develop a calibration method to evaluate mineral density profiles in dentine including changes associated with dentinal caries. A series of K(2)HPO(4) solution phantoms in a concentration range between 0 and 0.9 g cm(-3)--coupled to a set of water infiltrated porous solid hydroxyapatite (HA) phantoms, with mineral densities ranging from 1.52 to 2.08 g cm(-3), was used in this investigation. First we evaluated the micrometer-scale homogeneity and noise in the HA phantoms using a commercial laboratory micro-CT system. Then an experimental validation was performed of the linearity over the entire density range of these two different calibration materials. The results show the HA phantoms extended the calibration curve obtained from K(2)HPO(4) solution phantoms to densities as high as 2.08 g cm(-3); the linearity remains stable at different energy levels. Finally, compared to the reference micro-CT calibration methods, the advantages of this new method are discussed. We conclude that this calibration method allows a more rational assessment of mineral density of dentine by micro-CT and has a promising potential for future studies.
Absorption, metabolism, and excretion of [(14)C]MK-0524, a prostaglandin D(2) receptor antagonist, in humans. - Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals
[(3R)-4-(4-Chlorobenzyl)-7-fluoro-5-(methylsulfonyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocyclopentaindol-3-yl]acetic acid (MK-0524) is a potent orally active human prostaglandin D(2) receptor 1 antagonist that is currently under development for the prevention of niacin-induced flushing. The metabolism and excretion of [(14)C]MK-0524 in humans were investigated in six healthy human volunteers following a single p.o. dose of 40 mg (202 microCi). [(14)C]MK-0524 was absorbed rapidly, with plasma C(max) achieved 1 to 1.5 h postdose. The major route of excretion of radioactivity was via the feces, with 68% of the administered dose recovered in feces. Urinary excretion averaged 22% of the administered dose, for a total excretion recovery of approximately 90%. The majority of the dose was excreted within 96 h following dosing. Parent compound was the primary radioactive component circulating in plasma, comprising 42 to 72% of the total radioactivity in plasma for up to 12 h. The only other radioactive component detected in plasma was M2, the acyl glucuronic acid conjugate of the parent compound. The major radioactive component in urine was M2, representing 64% of the total radioactivity. Minor metabolites included hydroxylated epimers (M1/M4) and their glucuronic acid conjugates, which occurred in the urine as urea adducts, formed presumably during storage of samples. Fecal radioactivity profiles mainly comprised the parent compound, originating from unabsorbed parent and/or hydrolyzed glucuronic acid conjugate of the parent compound. Therefore, in humans, MK-0524 was eliminated primarily via metabolism to the acyl glucuronic acid conjugate, followed by excretion of the conjugate into bile and eventually into feces.
Absorption, metabolism, and excretion of [14C]MK-0767 (2-methoxy-5-(2,4-dioxo-5-thiazolidinyl)-N-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] methyl]benzamide) in humans. - Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals
MK-0767 (KRP-297; 2-methoxy-5-(2,4-dioxo-5-thiazolidinyl)-N-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] methyl]benzamide) is a thiazolidinedione (TZD)-containing dual agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma that has been studied as a potential treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes. The metabolism and excretion of [14C]MK-0767 were evaluated in six human volunteers after a 5-mg (200 microCi) oral dose. Excretion of 14C radioactivity was found to be nearly equal into the urine (approximately 50%) and feces (approximately 40%). Elimination of [14C]MK-0767 was primarily by metabolism, with minimal excretion of parent compound into the urine (<0.5% of dose) and feces (approximately 14% of the dose). [14C]MK-0767 was the major circulating compound-related entity (>96% of radioactivity) through 48 h postdose. It was also found that approximately 91% of the total radioactivity area under the curve was due to intact MK-0767. Several minor metabolites were detected in plasma (<1% of radioactivity, each), formed by cleavage of the TZD ring and subsequent S-methylation and oxidation. All the metabolites excreted into urine were formed by TZD cleavage, whereas the major metabolite in feces was the O-demethylated derivative of MK-0767.
Pharmacological characterization and radioligand binding properties of a high-affinity, nonpeptide, bradykinin B1 receptor antagonist. - European journal of pharmacology
Compound A (N-[2-[4-(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)phenyl]ethyl]-2-[(2R)-1-(2-napthylsulfonyl)-3-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoxalin-2-yl]acetamide) is a member of a new class of aryl sulfonamide dihydroquinoxalinone bradykinin B1 receptor antagonists that should be useful pharmacological tools. Here we report on some of the pharmacological properties of compound A as well as the characterization of [35S]compound A as the first nonpeptide bradykinin B1 receptor radioligand. Compound A inhibited tritiated peptide ligand binding to the cloned human, rabbit, dog, and rat bradykinin B1 receptors expressed in CHO cells with Ki values of 0.016, 0.050, 0.56, and 29 nM, respectively. It was inactive at 10 microM in binding assays with the cloned human bradykinin B2 receptor. In functional antagonist assays with the cloned bradykinin B1 receptors, compound A inhibited agonist-induced signaling with activities consistent with the competition binding results, but had no antagonist activity at the bradykinin B2 receptor. Compound A was also found to be a potent antagonist in a rabbit aorta tissue bath preparation and to effectively block des-Arg9 bradykinin depressor responses in lipopolysaccharide-treated rabbit following intravenous administration. The binding of [35S]compound A was evaluated with the cloned bradykinin B1 receptors. In assays with human, rabbit, and dog receptors, [35S]compound A labeled a single site with Kd values of 0.012, 0.064, and 0.37 nM, respectively, and with binding site densities equivalent to those obtained using the conventional tritiated peptide ligands. Binding assays with the cloned rat bradykinin B1 receptor were not successful, presumably due to the low affinity of the ligand for this species receptor. There was no specific binding of the ligand detected in CHO cells expressing the human bradykinin B2 receptor. In assays with the cloned human bradykinin B1 receptor, the pharmacologies of the binding of [35S]compound A and [3H][Leu9]des-Arg10-kallidin were the same. The high signal-to-noise ratio obtained with [35S]compound A will allow this ligand to be a very useful tool for future investigations of the bradykinin B1 receptor.
A small molecule alpha4beta1/alpha4beta7 antagonist differentiates between the low-affinity states of alpha4beta1 and alpha4beta7: characterization of divalent cation dependence. - The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics
An alpha4beta1/alpha4beta7 dual antagonist, 35S-compound 1, was used as a model ligand to study the effect of divalent cations on the activation state and ligand binding properties of alpha4 integrins. In the presence of 1 mM each Ca2+/Mg2+, 35S-compound 1 bound to several cell lines expressing both alpha4beta1 and alpha4beta7, but 2S-[(1-benzenesulfonyl-pyrrolidine-2S-carbonyl)-amino]-4-[4-methyl-2S-(methyl-[2-[4-(3-o-tolyl-ureido)-phenyl]-acetyl]-amino) pentanoylamino]-butyric acid (BIO7662), a specific alpha4beta1 antagonist, completely inhibited 35S-compound 1 binding, suggesting that alpha4beta1 was responsible for the observed binding. 35S-Compound 1 bound RPMI-8866 cells expressing predominantly alpha4beta7 with a KD of 1.9 nM in the presence of 1 mM Mn2+, and binding was inhibited only 29% by BIO7662, suggesting that the probe is a potent antagonist of activated alpha4beta7. With Ca2+/Mg2+, 35S-compound 1 bound Jurkat cells expressing primarily alpha4beta1 with a KD of 18 nM. In contrast, the binding of 35S-compound 1 to Mn2+-activated Jurkat cells occurred slowly, reaching equilibrium by 60 min, and failed to dissociate within another 60 min. The ability of four alpha4beta1/alpha4beta7 antagonists to block binding of activated alpha4beta1 or alpha4beta7 to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 or mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1, respectively, or to 35S-compound 1 was measured, and a similar rank order of potency was observed for native ligand and probe. Inhibition of 35S-compound 1 binding to alpha4beta1 in Ca2+/Mg2+ was used to identify nonselective antagonists among these four. These studies demonstrate that alpha4beta1 and alpha4beta7 have distinct binding properties for the same ligand, and binding parameters are dependent on the state of integrin activation in response to different divalent cations.
A comparison of HIV-positive and HIV-negative crack users enrolled in a residential addiction treatment program. - The American journal of drug and alcohol abuse
This study compared 96 HIV-Positive (HIV+) and 357 HIV-Negative (HIV-) crack users who were participating in the same drug-free, residential treatment program. Comparisons were made on sociodemographic, health, criminal justice, psychosocial, and recovery motivation variables. As predicted, the HIV(+) participants were more apt than the HIV(-) participants to be female and recently homeless. Also as predicted, HIV(+) participants had poorer subjective health, had more convictions for various criminal offenses, and were less apt to acquire employment during treatment when compared to the HIV(-) participants. Contrary to prediction, HIV(+) participants reported more social support, were not less committed to abstinence or 12-step groups, and were not less apt to complete the treatment program in comparison to the HIV(-) participants. These results suggest that HIV(+) crack users can be successfully treated in a rigorous treatment program. Future research should examine post-treatment outcomes among HIV-infected persons.

Map & Directions

1200 Westwood Dr Hamilton, MT 59840

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