Docality.com Logo
 
Dr. Jason  Tarno  Do image

Dr. Jason Tarno Do

2222 North Nevada Avenue Suite 4001
Colorado Springs CO 80907
719 369-9393
Medical School: Kirksville College Of Osteopathic Medicine - 1996
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 50369
NPI: 1114077278
Taxonomy Codes:
207Q00000X 207QS0010X

Request Appointment Information

Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Jason Tarno is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99291 Description:Critical care first hour Average Price:$470.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$215.89
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$334.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$194.33
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$227.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$132.28
HCPCS Code:99233 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$173.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$99.66
HCPCS Code:99239 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$174.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$102.79
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$124.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$69.51

HCPCS Code Definitions

99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99291
Critical care, evaluation and management of the critically ill or critically injured patient; first 30-74 minutes
99239
Hospital discharge day management; more than 30 minutes
99233
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1457365926
Family Practice
1,858
1154419281
Internal Medicine
1,243
1457349771
Medical Oncology
968
1477541795
Hematology/Oncology
849
1811984776
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
840
1073590782
Hematology/Oncology
763
1578649984
Internal Medicine
752
1447383237
Internal Medicine
693
1972506053
Internal Medicine
682
1457336976
Hematology/Oncology
682
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Tarno has made to other doctors

Publications

The magnitude of tissue cooling during cryotherapy with varied types of compression. - Journal of athletic training
Certified athletic trainers can choose different types of external compression (none, Flex-i-Wrap, and elastic wrap) when applying an ice bag to the body. However, which type facilitates the greatest magnitude of tissue cooling is unclear.To compare the effects of 2 common types of external compression on the magnitude of surface and intramuscular cooling during an ice-bag treatment.Randomized controlled trial.University research laboratory.Fourteen college students (10 women, 4 men; age = 22.4 +/- 1.8 years, height = 169.1 +/- 8.2 cm, mass = 73.3 +/- 18.5 kg, skinfold = 13.14 +/- 1.61 mm) with previous cryotherapy experience and a posterior lower leg skinfold equal to or less than 15 mm.On 3 different days separated by 24 to 48 hours, an ice bag was applied to the posterior lower leg surface of each participant for 30 minutes with no compression, with elastic wrap, or with Flex-i-Wrap.Posterior lower leg surface and intramuscular (2 cm) temperatures were recorded for 95 minutes.At 15 minutes, the elastic wrap produced greater surface temperature reduction than no compression (P = .03); this difference remained throughout the protocol (P range, .03 to .04). At 30 minutes, surface temperatures were 14.95 degrees C, 11.55 degrees C, and 9.49 degrees C when an ice bag was applied with no external compression, Flex-i-Wrap, and elastic wrap, respectively. Surface temperatures between Flex-i-Wrap and elastic wrap and between Flex-i-Wrap and no compression were never different. At 10 minutes, Flex-i-Wrap (P = .006) and elastic wrap (P < .001) produced greater intramuscular temperature reduction than no compression produced; these differences remained throughout the protocol. At 10 minutes, no compression, Flex-i-Wrap, and elastic wrap decreased intramuscular temperature by 1.34 degrees C, 2.46 degrees C, and 2.73 degrees C, respectively. At 25 minutes, elastic wrap (8.03 degrees C) produced greater temperature reduction than Flex-i-Wrap (6.65 degrees C) (P = .03) or no compression (4.63 degrees C) (P < .001 ). These differences remained throughout ice application and until 50 minutes after ice-bag removal.During an ice-bag application, external compression with elastic wrap was more effective than Flex-i-Wrap at reducing intramuscular tissue temperature. Elastic wraps should be used for acute injury care.

Map & Directions

2222 North Nevada Avenue Suite 4001 Colorado Springs, CO 80907
View Directions In Google Maps

Nearby Doctors

2312 N Nevada Ave Suite 100
719 733-3272
1625 Medical Ctr Pt
719 355-5148
2222 North Nevada Avenue Suite 5017
719 352-2501
3155 N Union Blvd
719 303-3937
2222 North Nevada Avenue Suite 5001
719 361-1201
2222 N Nevada Ave Suite 5017
719 352-2501
1625 Medical Center Point Suite 240
719 779-9063
1715 N Weber St Suite 208
719 719-9817
2920 N Cascade Ave
719 363-3937
2312 N Nevada Ave Suite 100
719 733-3272