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Dr. Stephen  Merola  Md image

Dr. Stephen Merola Md

5645 Main St
Flushing NY 11355
718 450-0220
Medical School: Mount Sinai School Of Medicine Of City University Of New York - 1995
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: 205298
NPI: 1104873181
Taxonomy Codes:
208600000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Stephen Merola is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99221 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$225.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$110.67
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$231.10 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$120.67
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$258.65 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$149.44
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$200.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$118.68
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$130.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$77.90
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$125.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$80.51

HCPCS Code Definitions

99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99221
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed or comprehensive history; A detailed or comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of low severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1376542944
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
255
1710921051
Internal Medicine
252
1437187846
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
158
1639105703
Diagnostic Radiology
140
1124081302
Diagnostic Radiology
137
1518920347
Diagnostic Radiology
133
1306809066
Diagnostic Radiology
128
1144220674
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
123
1538229984
Gastroenterology
79
1013937853
Diagnostic Radiology
75
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Merola has made to other doctors

Publications

Are laparoscopic bariatric procedures safe in superobese (BMI ≥50 kg/m2) patients? An NSQIP data analysis. - Surgery for obesity and related diseases : official journal of the American Society for Bariatric Surgery
The safety of laparoscopic bariatric procedures in superobese patients is still debatable.Using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program's participant-use file, the patients who had undergone laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding for morbid obesity were identified. Several perioperative variables, including 30-day morbidity and mortality, were collected, and the data were compared within each procedure after dividing the patients according to the body mass index: <50 kg/m(2) (morbidly obese group and ≥50 kg/m(2) (superobese group).A total of 29,323 patients who had undergone laparoscopic bariatric procedures from 2005 to 2008 were identified. Overall, compared with the morbidly obese group, the superobese group had more men (3:2), younger patients, a greater incidence of co-morbidities (e.g., hypertension and dyspnea), a significantly increased length of stay, and a greater rate of 30-day mortality (.26% versus .07%, odds ratio [OR] 4.38, P = .0001). In the gastric bypass group, the superobese group had a significantly greater incidence of postoperative complications, including superficial wound infections (2.45%, OR 1.68, P = .0001), reintubation (.61%, OR 1.97, P = .003), pulmonary embolism (.30%, OR 2.13, P = .032), myocardial infarction (.07%, P = .017), deep vein thrombosis (.49%, OR 2.06, P = .006), septic shock (.44%, OR 1.74, P = .04), and 30-day mortality (.28%, OR 2.26, P = .026). In the laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding group, the superobese group had a significantly greater incidence of postoperative complications, including superficial (1.65%, OR 2.18, P = .0013) and deep (.23%, OR 2.56, P = .035) wound infections, sepsis, septic shock and 30-day mortality (.17%, OR 13.4, P = .0219).Laparoscopic bariatric procedures in superobese patients have been associated with significantly increased complications, including 30-day mortality, compared with morbidly obese patients. However, overall, the procedures appear to be safe, with low complication and 30-day mortality rates.Copyright © 2011 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in morbidly obese patients > or =55 years old. - Obesity surgery
Advanced age is considered a relative contraindication to bariatric surgery at some institutions because of concerns about higher morbidity and less than optimal weight loss. The aim of our study was to evaluate the operative outcomes, length of stay, weight loss, and improvement of comorbidities in patients > or =55 years old who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery in our institution.Retrospective data on 33 patients (26 women and 7 men) > or =55 years of age who underwent LRYGB from January 2003 to December 2006 were reviewed.Average patient age was 59 years (range 55-68 years), and the mean preoperative body mass index was 47 kg/m2 (range 41.1-55.8 kg/m2). The median length of hospital stay was 3 days. There were no intraoperative or postoperative deaths. Early complications were one anastomotic leak, two upper gastrointestinal bleedings, and two readmissions for intractable vomiting. Late complications included four anastomotic strictures and one small bowel obstruction. Patients were followed for a mean 13 months (range 3-24 months). The mean excess body weight (EBW) loss was 13.5 kg (23%), 23.3 kg (39.8%), 33.3 kg (58.1%), 39.8 kg (66.8%), 40.1 kg (69.5%), and 40.8 kg (75.3%) at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 24 months, respectively. Diabetes mellitus improved in 19 (100%) patients and completely resolved in 10 (53%). Hypertension improved in 18 (64%) patients, completely resolved in 9 (32%) and was unchanged in 10 (36%).LRYGB is safe and effective in morbidly obese patients > or =55 years of age.
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on morbidly obese patients with hypothyroidism. - Obesity surgery
It is well known that obesity is accompanied by changes in thyroid function. Hypothyroidism is associated with increased body weight. The aim of this study was to evaluate the operative outcomes, weight loss, and the effect of weight loss on thyroid function in morbidly obese patients with hypothyroidism who undergo laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery.A retrospective review of 20 morbidly obese female patients with hypothyroidism and on thyroid replacement therapy who underwent LRYGB between January 2003 and August 2006.Mean preoperative body mass index (BMI) was 47.6 kg/m2 (range 38-58.5 kg/m2). Average patient age was 44.5 years (range 21-66 years). There was one early complication (pneumonia). Late complications included one death, three anastomotic strictures, and one small bowel obstruction. The patients were followed for a mean of 13.5 months (range 3-24 months). Their mean excess body weight loss was 13 kg (22%), 24.4 kg (39.4%), 33.2 kg (63.3%), 38.4 kg (65%), 41.7 kg (70%), and 43 kg (73%) at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 months, respectively. Change in a mean BMI was the same regardless of the patient preoperative and postoperative thyroxine dose. Hypothyroidism resolved in 5(25%) patients, improved in 2(10%) patients, unchanged in 8(40%) patients, and worsened in 5 (25%) patients. Most of the five whose hypothyroidism worsened had thyroid autoimmune disease.Hypothyroidism appears to improve in the vast majority of morbidly obese patients who undergo LRYGB, except for those whose thyroid disease is autoimmune in nature.
Diagnosis and management of internal hernias after laparoscopic gastric bypass. - Obesity surgery
Internal hernia is a known complication of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP). However, no consensus exists regarding optimal diagnostic modality and management. We reviewed the literature and our own experience, and present an algorithm for the diagnosis and management of internal hernia after LRYGBP.A retrospective review of 290 retrocolic LRYGBPs was performed to identify those who developed postoperative small bowel obstruction due to internal hernia. Demographics, clinical symptoms, radiologic characteristics, and operative outcomes were analyzed to determine clinical and radiological diagnostic accuracy.Over a 43-month period, 11 out of 290 (3.79%) post-LRYGBP patients with symptoms suggestive of a small bowel obstruction underwent operative exploration. The most common clinical symptoms included intermittent abdominal pain, and/or nausea/vomiting. All patients were initially explored laparoscopically. Etiology of obstructions included internal hernias--6 [at the transverse mesocolon (n = 1), Petersen's space (n = 2), and at the jejunojejunostomy (n = 3)], adhesions (n = 4) and a negative laparoscopy (n = 1). The mean time for development of internal hernias was 13.7 months. Mean loss of BMI units at time of re-operation was 17 kg/m2. Of the 6 patients with internal hernia, 2 (30%) had normal preoperative radiological work-up. On review of the preoperative films by the surgeon, signs of internal herniation were seen in all the patients. Management included initial laparoscopic exploration, lysis of adhesions, reduction of internal hernia and closure of mesenteric defects in all the patients. There were 2 conversions to laparotomy.Small bowel obstruction in the post-LRYGBP patient is difficult to diagnose, especially when due to an internal hernia. Most patients present with intermittent abdominal pain and/or nausea. The most frequently used radiologic study is CT scan, which is most accurate when reviewed by the bariatric surgeon preoperatively.
Telerobotic-assisted laparoscopic right and sigmoid colectomies for benign disease. - Diseases of the colon and rectum
Telerobotic surgical systems attempt to provide technological solutions to the inherent limitations of traditional laparoscopic surgery. In this article, we present the first two reported cases of telerobotic-assisted laparoscopic colectomies performed on March 6 and 8, 2001.In the first patient we performed a telerobotic-assisted laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy for diverticulitis. In the second patient, we accomplished a telerobotic-assisted laparoscopic right hemicolectomy for cecal diverticulitis. The Da Vinci telerobotic surgical system was used in both cases to mobilize the bowel. The mesenteric division, bowel transection, and anastomoses were accomplished with standard laparoscopic-assisted techniques. Both operations were completed with a three-trocar technique.We found that the Da Vinci system adequately replaced the camera holder. The three-dimensional virtual operative field helped to maintain the surgeon's orientation during the operation. The combination of three-dimensional imaging and the hand-like motions of the telerobotic surgical instruments facilitated dissection. The Da Vinci console offered an ergonomically comfortable position for the surgeon. Operative times for the sigmoid colectomy was 340 minutes and for the right hemicolectomy 228 minutes. Telerobotic-assisted laparoscopic colectomy is feasible, but required a longer operative time than our standard laparoscopic-assisted technique.Telerobotic-assisted laparoscopic colectomy is feasible and warrants further investigations in controlled trials.
Comparison of laparoscopic colectomy with and without the aid of a robotic camera holder. - Surgical laparoscopy, endoscopy & percutaneous techniques
The use of a robotic camera holder (AESOP 3000; Computer Motion, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA, U.S.A.) during laparoscopic surgery is slowly becoming more popular with laparoscopic surgeons. However, few published reports document the effects of the robot on operative outcomes or operative times. In the current study, we compared the use of a voice-controlled robotic camera holder to a human camera holder in a series of laparoscopic colectomies. The outcome data measured included the number of patients with postoperative complications, the patients' length of stay at the hospital, and the operative times for the procedures. There were 2 complications among the 11 patients in group 1 (colectomies performed without a robotic camera holder), versus 2 complications among the 15 patients in group 2 (colectomies performed with a robotic camera holder) (P = NS). Patients in group 1 had an average length of stay of 4.1 days, versus 4.4 days for those in group 2 (P = NS). The operative time for group 1 was 235 minutes, compared with 213 minutes for group 2 (P = NS). The use of a voice-controlled robotic camera holder does not alter the length of the operative procedure, the patient's length of stay, or postoperative morbidity. However, surgeons often have a subjective sense that there is less smudging, fogging, and inadvertent movements of the laparoscope when it is controlled by a robotic system. In addition, using a voice-controlled robot as a camera holder does eliminate the need for a surgical assistant.

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5645 Main St Flushing, NY 11355
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