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Dr. Gabriel  Ortiz  Md image

Dr. Gabriel Ortiz Md

615 Nw Loop 410 Suite 210
San Antonio TX 78216
210 848-8282
Medical School: University Of Texas Medical School At Houston - 1998
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: L0892
NPI: 1093795718
Taxonomy Codes:
207Q00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Gabriel Ortiz is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:84153 Description:Assay of psa total Average Price:$91.95 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$26.06
HCPCS Code:84443 Description:Assay thyroid stim hormone Average Price:$83.93 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$23.80
HCPCS Code:93000 Description:Electrocardiogram complete Average Price:$74.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$17.82
HCPCS Code:80061 Description:Lipid panel Average Price:$66.96 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$16.43
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$147.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$99.13
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$147.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$99.68
HCPCS Code:80053 Description:Comprehen metabolic panel Average Price:$52.85 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.60
HCPCS Code:83036 Description:Glycosylated hemoglobin test Average Price:$48.55 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$13.75
HCPCS Code:80076 Description:Hepatic function panel Average Price:$40.85 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$8.93
HCPCS Code:80048 Description:Metabolic panel total ca Average Price:$42.32 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.13
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$98.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$66.92
HCPCS Code:J1100 Description:Dexamethasone sodium phos Average Price:$22.41 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$0.12
HCPCS Code:82044 Description:Microalbumin semiquant Average Price:$28.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$6.48
HCPCS Code:85610 Description:Prothrombin time Average Price:$26.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$5.56
HCPCS Code:Q2036 Description:Flulaval vacc, 3 yrs & >, im Average Price:$25.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$9.39
HCPCS Code:85025 Description:Complete cbc w/auto diff wbc Average Price:$26.43 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.02
HCPCS Code:Q2038 Description:Fluzone vacc, 3 yrs & >, im Average Price:$25.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.12
HCPCS Code:82962 Description:Glucose blood test Average Price:$16.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.32
HCPCS Code:G0008 Description:Admin influenza virus vac Average Price:$32.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$22.51
HCPCS Code:81003 Description:Urinalysis auto w/o scope Average Price:$11.20 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.18
HCPCS Code:36415 Description:Routine venipuncture Average Price:$10.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.00

HCPCS Code Definitions

93000
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; with interpretation and report
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
G0008
Administration of influenza virus vaccine
J1100
Injection, dexamethasone sodium phosphate, 1mg
Q2036
Influenza virus vaccine, split virus, when administered to individuals 3 years of age and older, for intramuscular use (flulaval)
Q2038
Influenza virus vaccine, split virus, when administered to individuals 3 years of age and older, for intramuscular use (fluzone)

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1821183559
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
314
1598730624
Diagnostic Radiology
237
1538251319
Dermatology
235
1679548762
Diagnostic Radiology
185
1518932045
Diagnostic Radiology
150
1295700771
Diagnostic Radiology
139
1225003981
Diagnostic Radiology
128
1780679761
Diagnostic Radiology
108
1558389981
Diagnostic Radiology
101
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Ortiz has made to other doctors

Publications

Effectiveness of Enteral Versus Oral Nutrition With a Medium-Chain Triglyceride Formula to Prevent Malnutrition and Growth Impairment in Infants With Biliary Atresia. - Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition
The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of oral (PO) versus enteral nutrition (EN) medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) containing-formula to prevent malnutrition and growth impairment in infants with biliary atresia (BA) waiting for a liver transplant.A total of 15 infants, 3 to 9 months old with BA were included. They were randomly assigned to either PO or EN. For 12 weeks, both groups received an MCT formula fortified with glucose polymers and corn oil to reach a caloric density between 0.8 and 1 kcal/mL. The formula given to the PO group was administered ad libitum and that given via EN was infused through a nasogastric tube to reach 140% of the energy intake recommended by the Dietary Recommended Intake guidelines. Protein intake was adjusted to 4 to 5 g/kg present weight. Outcome variables were growth and nutritional status evaluated periodically by anthropometric indicators. Biochemical and hematological variables were evaluated through the study.Baseline clinical, nutritional, biochemical, and hematological variables showed no differences between the study groups. Baseline length/age was <-2 SD in 10 of the 15 patients; in the PO group, it fell <-3 SD, whereas in the EN group, it remained stable. Head circumference z score dropped 0.6 SD in the PO group, whereas in the EN group it remained stable. Triceps skinfold values improved in the infants taking EN, P < 0.001. The frequency of adverse effects-respiratory infection and diarrhea-was higher in the EN group. No biochemical or hematological differences were observed between the study groups throughout the study.A 12-week EN trial with an MCT-fortified formula prevented malnutrition and growth impairment in infants with BA waiting for a liver transplant.
Epidemiology and risk factors for infections due to AmpC β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli. - The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy
To describe the prevalence and risk factors for infection due to AmpC β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (AmpC-EC).For the prevalence study, all clinical isolates of E. coli with reduced susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins were prospectively included from June 2010 to November 2011. For risk factor analysis, a case-control study was conducted. Cases were patients with an infection due to AmpC-EC. Controls were patients infected with cephalosporin-susceptible E. coli, matched 1 : 2. Detection of blaAmpC genes was done with a multiplex AmpC-PCR, and hyperproduction of E. coli chromosomal blaAmpC by quantitative RT-PCR. Alteration of the blaAmpC promoter was studied by PCR and sequencing.We identified 243 (1.1%) AmpC-EC strains out of 21 563 clinical isolates. Three cases with strains carrying ESBLs, 18 strains that were considered due to colonization and 8 cases lost to clinical follow-up were excluded. Finally, 214 cases were included in the analysis. Ninety-one cases (42.5%) and 269 (62.8%) controls were strictly community acquired (P < 0.001). Thirty-five (16.3%) cases and 186 controls (43.5%) did not have any identifiable risk factor (P < 0.001). Among cases, 158 (73.8%) were found to harbour an acquired AmpC (73.4% CMY-2). Previous use of fluoroquinolones [OR 2.6 (95% CI 1.12-3.36); P = 0.008] was independently associated with AmpC-EC in the multivariate analysis.Prevalence of AmpC in E. coli remains low in our area. Plasmid acquisition (CMY type) represents the main mechanism of AmpC production. A high proportion of community-acquired isolates and patients with no identifiable risk factors were found. Previous use of fluoroquinolones was identified as a risk factor.© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
Levels of circulating myeloid subpopulations and of heme oxygenase-1 do not predict CD4(+) T cell recovery after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy for HIV disease. - AIDS research and therapy
The level (or frequency) of circulating monocyte subpopulations such as classical (CD14(hi)CD16(-)) and non-classical (CD14(dim)CD16(+)) monocytes varies during the course of HIV disease progression and antiretroviral therapy (ART). We hypothesized that such variation and/or differences in the degree to which these cells expressed the immunoregulatory enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), would be associated with CD4(+) T cell recovery after the initiation of ART. This hypothesis was tested in a cross-sectional study of four groups of HIV-infected subjects, including those who were seronegative, untreated virologic controllers [detectable viral load (VL) of <1000 copies/mL], untreated virologic non-controllers [VL > 10,000 copies/mL], and ART-mediated virologic controllers [VL < 75 copies/mL]. A longitudinal analysis of ART-treated subjects was also performed along with regression analysis to determine which biomarkers were associated with and/or predictive of CD4(+) T cell recovery. Suppressive ART was associated with increased levels of classical monocyte subpopulations (CD14(hi)CD16(-)) and decreased levels of non-classical monocyte populations (CD14(dim)CD16(+)). Among peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), HO-1 was found to be most highly up-regulated in CD14(+) monocytes after ex vivo stimulation. Neither the levels of monocyte subpopulations nor of HO-1 expression in CD14(+) monocytes were significantly associated with the degree of CD4(+) T cell recovery. Monocyte subpopulations and HO-1 gene expression were, however, restored to normal levels by suppressive ART. These results suggest that the level of circulating monocyte subpopulations and their expression of HO-1 have no evident relationship to CD4(+) T cell recovery after the initiation of ART.
Ocular and nasal allergy symptom burden in America: the Allergies, Immunotherapy, and RhinoconjunctivitiS (AIRS) surveys. - Allergy and asthma proceedings : the official journal of regional and state allergy societies
Previous nationwide surveys of allergies in the United States have focused on nasal symptoms, but ocular symptoms are also relevant. This study determines the effects of ocular and nasal allergies on patients' lives. Telephone surveys of randomly selected U.S. households (the patient survey) and health care providers (provider survey) were conducted in the United States in 2012. Study participants were 2765 people ≥5 years of age who had ever been diagnosed with nasal or ocular allergies and 500 health care providers in seven specialties. Respondents to the patient survey reported a bimodal seasonal distribution of allergy symptoms, with peaks in March to May and September. Nasal congestion was the most common of the symptoms rated as "extremely bothersome" (39% of respondents), followed by red, itchy eyes (34%; p = 0.84 for difference in extreme bothersomeness of nasal and ocular symptoms). Twenty-nine percent of respondents reported that their or their child's daily life was impacted "a lot" when allergy symptoms were at their worst. Workers rated their mean productivity at 29% lower when allergy symptoms were at their worst (p < 0.001 compared with no symptoms). Providers reported that itchy eyes was the symptom causing most patients to seek medical treatment by pediatricians (73%), ophthalmologist/optometrists (72%), and nurse practitioners or physician assistants (62%), whereas nasal congestion was the symptom causing most patients to seek treatment from otolaryngologists (85%), allergist/immunologists (79%), and family medicine practitioners (64%). Ocular and nasal allergy symptoms substantially affected patients' lives and were comparable in their impact.
Higher CD27+CD8+ T cells percentages during suppressive antiretroviral therapy predict greater subsequent CD4+ T cell recovery in treated HIV infection. - PloS one
HIV-mediated immune dysfunction may influence CD4(+) T cell recovery during suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). We analyzed cellular biomarkers of immunological inflammation, maturation, and senescence in HIV-infected subjects on early suppressive ART. We performed longitudinal analyses of peripheral immunological biomarkers of subjects on suppressive ART (n = 24) from early treatment (median 6.4 months, interquartile range [IQR] 4.8-13.9 months) to 1-2 years of follow-up (median 19.8 months, IQR 18.3-24.6 months). We performed multivariate regression to determine which biomarkers were associated with and/or predictive of CD4(+) T cell recovery. After adjusting for the pre-ART CD4(+) T cell count, age, proximal CD4(+) T cell count, and length of ART medication, the percentage of CD27(+)CD8(+) T cells remained significantly associated with the CD4(+) T cell recovery rate (β = 0.092 cells/ul/month, P = 0.028). In HIV-infected subjects starting suppressive ART, patients with the highest percentage of CD8(+) T cells expressing CD27 had the greatest rate of CD4(+) T cell recovery.
Morphine produces immunosuppressive effects in nonhuman primates at the proteomic and cellular levels. - Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP
Morphine has long been known to have immunosuppressive properties in vivo, but the molecular and immunologic changes induced by it are incompletely understood. To explore how these changes interact with lentiviral infections in vivo, animals from two nonhuman primate species (African green monkeys and pigtailed macaques) were provided morphine and studied using a systems biology approach. Biological specimens were obtained from multiple sources (e.g. lymph node, colon, cerebrospinal fluid, and peripheral blood) before and after the administration of morphine (titrated up to a maximum dose of 5 mg/kg over a period of 20 days). Cellular immune, plasma cytokine, and proteome changes were measured and morphine-induced changes in these parameters were assessed on an interorgan, interindividual, and interspecies basis. In both species, morphine was associated with decreased levels of Ki-67(+) T-cell activation but with only minimal changes in overall T-cell counts, neutrophil counts, and NK cell counts. Although changes in T-cell maturation were observed, these varied across the various tissue/fluid compartments studied. Proteomic analysis revealed a morphine-induced suppressive effect in lymph nodes, with decreased abundance of protein mediators involved in the functional categories of energy metabolism, signaling, and maintenance of cell structure. These findings have direct relevance for understanding the impact of heroin addiction and the opioids used to treat addiction as well as on the potential interplay between opioid abuse and the immunological response to an infective agent.
Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. - The open nursing journal
Epidemiologic data indicate that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Patients with poorly managed COPD are likely to experience exacerbations that require emergency department visits or hospitalization-two important drivers contributing to escalating healthcare resource use and costs associated with the disease. Exacerbations also contribute to worsening lung function and negative outcomes in COPD. The aim of this review is to present the perspective of nurse practitioners and physician assistants in terms of providing the pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic modalities needed to treat current and prevent future exacerbations. Major respiratory guidelines recommend treatment of acute exacerbations with short-acting bronchodilators, oral corticosteroids and antibiotics, as appropriate. Supplementary oxygen and/or ventilatory support may also be beneficial to selected patients. Treatments to minimize the risk of future exacerbations should include maintenance pharmacotherapies, risk-reduction measures (e.g. smoking cessation, influenza and pneumonia vaccinations), pulmonary rehabilitation, self-management support and follow-up care.
Insights on allergic rhinitis from the patient perspective. - The Journal of family practice
Although intranasal steroid sprays are the preferred treatment of the majority of health care providers, this opinion is not carried through to patient treatment. Approximately two-thirds of adults with nasal allergy symptoms report that they use over-the-counter, nonprescription medicines, and only one-third report that they use an intranasal steroid spray. Lack of familiarity and poor patient awareness are key barriers to intranasal steroid spray use. Dissatisfaction related to side effects among users of these medications leads some of those who are familiar with intranasal steroid sprays to discontinue use after it has been prescribed. Improved health care provider–patient communication and education is a vital step toward improving the long-term management of allergic rhinitis.
Patient-Centered Medical Home in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. - Journal of multidisciplinary healthcare
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive and debilitating but preventable and treatable disease characterized by cough, phlegm, dyspnea, and fixed or incompletely reversible airway obstruction. Most patients with COPD rely on primary care practices for COPD management. Unfortunately, only about 55% of US outpatients with COPD receive all guideline-recommended care. Proactive and consistent primary care for COPD, as for many other chronic diseases, can reduce hospitalizations. Optimal chronic disease management requires focusing on maintenance rather than merely acute rescue. The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), which implements the chronic care model, is a promising framework for primary care transformation. This review presents core PCMH concepts and proposes multidisciplinary team-based PCMH care strategies for COPD.
Innovations to achieve excellence in COPD diagnosis and treatment in primary care. - Postgraduate medicine
Recognition of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often missed or delayed in primary care. Once recognized, COPD is often undertreated or episodically treated, focusing on acute exacerbations without establishing maintenance treatment to control ongoing disease. Diagnostic and therapeutic pessimism result in missed opportunities to reduce exacerbations, maintain physical functioning, and reduce emergent health care requirements. Proactive diagnosis and evidence-based management can alleviate the impact of COPD on patients' lives. Smoking cessation has been proven to slow the rate of lung function decline. Maintenance pharmacotherapy and immunizations reduce exacerbations. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves respiratory symptoms and physical functioning and reduces rehospitalizations after exacerbations. Self-management education improves health-related quality of life and reduces inpatient and emergency care usage. Maintenance treatment with long-acting inhaled bronchodilators is appropriate beginning in moderate COPD to maintain airway patency and reduce exacerbations. Tiotropium is US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved to treat bronchospasm and reduce exacerbations in patients with COPD; salmeterol/fluticasone is FDA approved to treat airflow obstruction in COPD and reduce exacerbations in patients with a history of exacerbations. Other maintenance long-acting bronchodilators-salmeterol, formoterol, and budesonide/formoterol-are FDA approved to treat airway obstruction in COPD but lack an approved indication against exacerbations. FDA warnings on the use of long-acting beta-adrenergic agents (LABAs) in asthma specifically exempt COPD and do not apply to LABA/inhaled corticosteroid combinations used in COPD. The actual effectiveness achieved in practice with any COPD therapies depends on patients' inhaler technique, adherence, and persistence. Medication usage rates and inhaler proficiency may be improved by concordance, in which the health care provider and patient collaborate to make treatment plans sustainable in the patient's daily life. Practice redesign for whole-patient primary care provides additional tools for comprehensive COPD management. Innovations such as group visits and the patient-centered medical home provide newer ways to interact with COPD patients and their families. Patient-focused and evidence-based options enable primary care practices to manage COPD longitudinally and improve patient outcomes through the course of the disease.

Map & Directions

615 Nw Loop 410 Suite 210 San Antonio, TX 78216
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