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Dr. Jeannette  Guerrasio  Md image

Dr. Jeannette Guerrasio Md

12401 E 17Th Ave Mail Code F782
Aurora CO 80045
720 484-4289
Medical School: Albany Medical College Of Union University - 2003
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 44330
NPI: 1083648679
Taxonomy Codes:
207R00000X 208M00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Jeannette Guerrasio is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$738.90 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$194.33
HCPCS Code:99220 Description:Initial observation care Average Price:$625.56 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$177.17
HCPCS Code:99239 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$388.36 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$102.79
HCPCS Code:99233 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$376.95 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$99.66
HCPCS Code:99221 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$369.75 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$97.69
HCPCS Code:99238 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$263.94 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$69.57
HCPCS Code:99217 Description:Observation care discharge Average Price:$264.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$69.86
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$263.17 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$69.51

HCPCS Code Definitions

99217
Observation care discharge day management (This code is to be utilized to report all services provided to a patient on discharge from "observation status" if the discharge is on other than the initial date of "observation status." To report services to a patient designated as "observation status" or "inpatient status" and discharged on the same date, use the codes for Observation or Inpatient Care Services [including Admission and Discharge Services, 99234-99236 as appropriate.])
99220
Initial observation care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission to "observation status" are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99221
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed or comprehensive history; A detailed or comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of low severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99233
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99238
Hospital discharge day management; 30 minutes or less
99239
Hospital discharge day management; more than 30 minutes

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1528090115
Internal Medicine
569
1629168307
Hematology/Oncology
544
1699865279
Internal Medicine
451
1720178304
Internal Medicine
403
1164512745
Internal Medicine
384
1568552248
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
273
1518058155
Diagnostic Radiology
209
1669562336
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
203
1235229139
Nephrology
203
1750437356
Diagnostic Radiology
202
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Guerrasio has made to other doctors

Publications

Heuristic errors in clinical reasoning. - The clinical teacher
Errors in clinical reasoning contribute to patient morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to determine the types of heuristic errors made by third-year medical students and first-year residents.This study surveyed approximately 150 clinical educators inquiring about the types of heuristic errors they observed in third-year medical students and first-year residents.Anchoring and premature closure were the two most common errors observed amongst third-year medical students and first-year residents. There was no difference in the types of errors observed in the two groups. Errors in clinical reasoning contribute to patient morbidity and mortality CONCLUSIONS: Clinical educators perceived that both third-year medical students and first-year residents committed similar heuristic errors, implying that additional medical knowledge and clinical experience do not affect the types of heuristic errors made. Further work is needed to help identify methods that can be used to reduce heuristic errors early in a clinician's education.© 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Association of Characteristics, Deficits, and Outcomes of Residents Placed on Probation at One Institution, 2002-2012. - Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
To describe the population of residents placed on probation, identify learner characteristics associated with being placed on probation, and describe immediate and long-term career outcomes for those placed on probation as compared with matched controls.The authors collected data for residents at the University of Colorado School of Medicine placed on probation from July 2002 to June 2012, including postgraduate year placed on probation, deficits identified, mandated evaluation for physical and mental health, duration of probation, disability accommodations requested, and number of additional training months required. They were retrospectively compared with 102 controls matched for specialty, matriculation, and postgraduate year. Variables assessed included demographics, academic performance, license status, specialty, state board certification, and board citations.Of 3,091 residents, 3.3% were placed on probation (88 residents; 14 fellows). Compared with controls, those on probation were more likely to be international medical graduates, married, not Caucasian, older (all P < .001), male (P = .01), to have transferred from another graduate medical education training program, and to have taken time off between medical school and residency (all P < .001). Among those currently in practice, 53 (63.9%) were board certified compared with 93 (100%) of the controls. Placement on probation was associated with failure to graduate and lack of board certification. All 7 graduates cited by state medical boards were in the probation group.Further research is needed to understand these associations and to determine whether changes in curricula or remediation programs may alter these outcomes.
Methods and outcomes for the remediation of clinical reasoning. - Journal of general internal medicine
There is no widely accepted structured, evidence based strategy for the remediation of clinical reasoning skills.To assess the effectiveness of a standardized clinical reasoning remediation plan for medical learners at various stages of training.Learners enrolled in the University of Colorado School of Medicine Remediation Program.From 2006 to 2012, the learner remediation program received 151 referrals. Referrals were made by medical student clerkship directors, residency and fellowship program directors, and through self-referrals. Each learner's deficiencies were identified using a standardized assessment process; 53 were noted to have clinical reasoning deficits. The authors developed and implemented a ten-step clinical reasoning remediation plan for each of these individuals, whose subsequent performance was independently assessed by unbiased faculty and senior trainees. Participant demographics, faculty time invested, and learner outcomes were tracked.Prevalence of clinical reasoning deficits did not differ by level of training of the remediating individual (p = 0.49). Overall, the mean amount of faculty time required for remediation was 29.6 h (SD = 29.3), with a median of 18 h (IQR 5-39) and a range of 2-100 h. Fifty-one of the 53 (96%) passed the post remediation reassessment. Thirty-eight (72%) learners either graduated from their original program or continue to practice in good standing. Four (8%) additional residents who were placed on probation and five (9%) who transferred to another program have since graduated.The ten-step remediation plan proved to be successful for the majority of learners struggling with clinical reasoning based on reassessment and limited subsequent educational outcomes. Next steps include implementing the program at other institutions to assess generalizability and tracking long-term outcomes on clinical care.
Failure to fail: the institutional perspective. - Medical teacher
To determine institutional barriers to placing failing students on probation, dismissing students.An online survey study was distributed to Student Affairs Deans or the equivalent at allopathic (MD) and osteopathic (DO) medical schools, and physician assistant (PA) and nurse practitioner (NP) schools across the United States. Nineteen (40%) of the 48 schools responded: six MD, four DO, five PA and four NP. The survey contained demographic questions and questions regarding probation and dismissal. Themes were independently coded and combined via consensus based on grounded theory. The survey was distributed until saturation of qualitative responses were achieved.Respondents identified variations in the use of probation and dismissal and a wide range of barriers, with the greatest emphasis on legal concerns. Respondents felt that students were graduating who should not be allowed to graduate, and that the likelihood of a student being placed on probation or being terminated was highly variable.Our results suggest that institution culture at heath professions schools across the United States may represent an obstacle in placing failing learners on probation and dismissing learners who should not graduate. Additional studies are needed to prove if these concerns are founded or merely fears.
Learner deficits and academic outcomes of medical students, residents, fellows, and attending physicians referred to a remediation program, 2006-2012. - Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
To identify deficit types and predictors of poor academic outcomes among students, residents, fellows, and physicians referred to the University of Colorado School of Medicine's remediation program.During 2006-2012, 151 learners were referred. After a standardized assessment process, program faculty developed individualized learning plans that incorporated deliberate practice, feedback, and reflection, followed by independent reassessment. The authors collected data on training levels, identified deficits, remediation plan details, outcomes, and faculty time invested. They examined relationships between gender, training level, and specific deficits. They analyzed faculty time by deficit and explored predictors of negative outcomes.Most learners had more than one deficit; medical knowledge, clinical reasoning, and professionalism were most common. Medical students were more likely than others to have mental well-being issues (P = .03), whereas the prevalence of professionalism deficits increased steadily as training level increased. Men struggled more than women with communication (P = .01) and mental well-being. Poor professionalism was the only predictor of probationary status (P < .001), and probation was a predictor of other negative outcomes (P < .0001). Remediation of clinical reasoning and mental well-being deficits required significantly more faculty time (P < .001 and P = .03, respectively). Per hour, faculty face time reduced the odds of probation by 3.1% (95% CI, 0.09-0.63) and all negative outcomes by 2.6% (95% CI, 0.96-0.99).Remediation required substantial resources but was successful for 90% of learners. Future studies should compare remediation strategies and assess how to optimize faculty time.
Determining need for remediation through postrotation evaluations. - Journal of graduate medical education
Postrotation evaluations are frequently used by residency program directors for early detection of residents with academic difficulties; however, the accuracy of these evaluations in assessing resident performance has been questioned.This retrospective case-control study examines the ability of postrotation evaluation characteristics to predict the need for remediation. We compared the evaluations of 17 residents who were placed on academic warning or probation, from 2000 to 2007, with those for a group of peers matched on sex, postgraduate year (PGY), and entering class.The presence of an outlier evaluation, the number of words written in the comments section, and the percentage of evaluations with negative or ambiguous comments were all associated with the need for remediation (P  =  .01, P  =  .001, P  =  .002, P  =  < .001, respectively). In contrast, United States Medical Licensing Examination step 1 and step 2 scores, total number of evaluations received, and percentage of positive comments on the evaluations were not associated with the need for remediation (P  =  .06, P  =  .87, P  =  .55, respectively).Despite ambiguous evaluation comments, the length and percentage of ambiguous or negative comments did indicate future need for remediation.Our study demonstrates that postrotation evaluation characteristics can be used to identify residents as risk. However, larger prospective studies, encompassing multiple institutions, are needed to validate various evaluation methods in measuring resident performance and to accurately predict the need for remediation.
Evaluation of a hospitalist-run acute care for the elderly service. - Journal of hospital medicine
Comprehensive care for frail older inpatients may improve selected outcomes and reduce harm.To evaluate a Hospitalist-run Acute Care for the Elderly (Hospitalist-ACE) service.Quasi-randomized, controlled trial.Urban academic medical center.Medical inpatients age ≥70 years.Hospitalist-ACE service components: 1) selected hospitalist attendings; 2) daily interdisciplinary rounds; 3) standardized geriatric assessment; 4) clinical focus on mitigating harm and discharge planning; 5) novel inpatient geriatrics curriculum.The primary outcome was recognition of abnormal functional status by the primary medical team. Secondary outcomes included: recognition of abnormal cognitive status and delirium by the primary medical team; use of physical restraints and sleep aids; documentation of code status; hospital charges, length of stay, readmission rates, discharge location, and falls.One hundred twenty-two Hospitalist-ACE patients were compared to 95 usual care patients. Hospitalist-ACE patients had significantly greater recognition of abnormal functional status (65% vs 32%, P < 0.0001), and abnormal cognitive status (57% vs 36%, P = 0.02), and greater use of "Do Not Attempt Resuscitation" orders (39% vs 26%, P = 0.04). There were no differences in use of physical restraints, or sleep aids, falls, or discharge location. Hospitalist-ACE patients and usual care patients had similar mean lengths of stay in days (3.4 ± 2.7 vs 3.1 ± 2.7, P = 0.52), mean charges ($24,617 ± $15,828 vs $21,488 ± $13,407, P = 0.12), and 30-day readmission rates (12% vs 10%, P = 0.50).A Hospitalist-ACE service may improve care processes without significantly increasing resource consumption. No impact on key clinical outcomes was observed.Copyright © 2011 Society of Hospital Medicine.
Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease presenting as severe depression: a case report. - Cases journal
An 81 year old female presented with altered mental status after new onset of severe depression and suicidal ideation with recent psychiatric hospitalization.Key clinical features included muscle rigidity, prominent startle reflex, and rapidly progressing cognitive decline. Initial working hypothesis was serotonin syndrome or neuroleptic malignant syndrome but continued deterioration after medication removal prompted evaluation for alternative etiology. Work-up revealed elevated 14-3-3 CSF protein which suggested the prion disorder which was confirmed on post-mortem examination of brain tissue.While the degree of depression was unusually severe, the case highlights the behavioral and psychiatric manifestations which frequently accompany Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease.

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12401 E 17Th Ave Mail Code F782 Aurora, CO 80045
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