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Dr. Konstantinos  Spiliopoulos   image

Dr. Konstantinos Spiliopoulos

300 Longwood Ave
Boston MA 02115
617 508-8883
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 249490
NPI: 1063791440
Taxonomy Codes:
207T00000X

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Publications

Vasculogenic mimicry: lessons from melanocytic tumors. - In vivo (Athens, Greece)
Tumor cell vasculogenic mimicry refers to the formation of tumor cell-lined vessels that contribute to tumor neovascularization and nutrient and oxygen supply. These tumor cells express many endothelial and stem cell markers, resulting in them having a unique phenotype. This phenomenon is observed in a variety of neoplasms, such as glioblastomas and sarcomas, as well as breast, ovarian, liver and lung carcinomas. It is also evident in melanocytic lesions, regardless of their benign or malignant nature. The biochemical and molecular events that regulate vasculogenic mimicry provide opportunities for development of novel forms of tumor-targeted treatments. Furthermore, the presence of this process in a tumor might have prognostic implications.Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.
Vasculogenic mimicry: lessons from melanocytic tumors. - In vivo (Athens, Greece)
Tumor cell vasculogenic mimicry refers to the formation of tumor cell-lined vessels that contribute to tumor neovascularization and nutrient and oxygen supply. These tumor cells express many endothelial and stem cell markers, resulting in them having a unique phenotype. This phenomenon is observed in a variety of neoplasms, such as glioblastomas and sarcomas, as well as breast, ovarian, liver and lung carcinomas. It is also evident in melanocytic lesions, regardless of their benign or malignant nature. The biochemical and molecular events that regulate vasculogenic mimicry provide opportunities for development of novel forms of tumor-targeted treatments. Furthermore, the presence of this process in a tumor might have prognostic implications.Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.
Encoding of rules by neurons in the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. - Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991)
We use rules to extend learned behavior beyond specific instances to general scenarios. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to play an important role in representing rules, as evidenced by subjects who have difficulty in following rules after PFC damage and by animal studies demonstrating rule sensitivity of individual PFC neurons. How rules are instantiated at the single-neuronal level in the human brain, however, remains unclear. Here, we recorded from individual neurons in the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) as subjects performed a task in which they evaluated pairs of images using either of 2 abstract rules. We find that DLPFC neurons selectively encoded these rules while carrying little information about the subjects' responses or the sensory cues used to guide their decisions.
Role of resection of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. - Journal of neurosurgery
Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive sarcomas that often arise from major peripheral nerves. Approximately half of MPNSTs arise in patients with neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) who, in comparison with patients without NF1, present at younger ages and with larger tumors that are commonly associated with extensive plexiform neurofibromas. These tumors therefore pose a particularly difficult treatment challenge because of the morbidity often associated with attempted gross-total resection (GTR). Here, the authors aim to examine what role the extent of resection and other covariates play in the long-term survival of patients with NF1 in the setting of MPNST.The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of 23 adult patients with NF1 who underwent surgery for MPNSTs at their institution between 1991 and 2008. The primary end points of the study were mortality, local recurrence, and metastasis. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were evaluated for all patients. Differences for each of the primary end points were evaluated based on cause-specific covariates, which included tiered tumor size, tumor location, grade, resection margin status, postoperative weakness, and use of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards models.Gross-total resection (p = 0.01) and surgical margin status (p = 0.034) had a statistically important role in prolonging overall survival in patients with NF1 by univariate analysis. When tumor size, location, grade, postoperative weakness, and radiation therapy were also taken into account using multivariate analysis, GTR continued to be a significant prognostic factor (p = 0.035).These findings suggest that GTR offers significant long-term benefit on survival in patients with NF1. Benefit on survival occurred independently of all other covariates, suggesting that complete resection should be the principal goal of treatment in this patient population.
Preoperative direct percutaneous embolization of spinal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. - Journal of neurointerventional surgery
Preoperative direct percutaneous embolization has been very rarely used in hypervascular metastatic spinal tumors to decrease blood loss during the surgery. A patient is presented with solitary spinal metastasis due to renal cell carcinoma who underwent a two-stage spondylectomy. Transarterial tumor embolization with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles and liquid coil placement, and percutaneous tumor embolization with PVA particles were used before the first and the second stage, respectively.

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