Docality.com Logo
 
Dr. Granville  Lloyd  Md image

Dr. Granville Lloyd Md

1 S Park St
Madison WI 53715
608 872-2900
Medical School: Brown University Program In Medicine - 1993
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: 56336
NPI: 1063527646
Taxonomy Codes:
208800000X

Request Appointment Information

Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Granville Lloyd is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:52000 Description:Cystoscopy Average Price:$622.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$106.76
HCPCS Code:52000 Description:Cystoscopy Average Price:$622.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$198.80
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$320.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$154.31
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$202.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$67.75
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$225.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$100.93
HCPCS Code:99202 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$159.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$47.34
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$202.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$99.56
HCPCS Code:99202 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$159.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$69.88
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$134.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$48.04
HCPCS Code:84153 Description:Assay of psa total Average Price:$112.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$26.06
HCPCS Code:51798 Description:Us urine capacity measure Average Price:$102.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$18.48
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$134.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$67.98
HCPCS Code:99212 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$103.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$40.94
HCPCS Code:82565 Description:Assay of creatinine Average Price:$45.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$7.01
HCPCS Code:87086 Description:Urine culture/colony count Average Price:$49.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.43
HCPCS Code:81000 Description:Urinalysis nonauto w/scope Average Price:$30.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$4.48
HCPCS Code:36415 Description:Routine venipuncture Average Price:$24.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.00
HCPCS Code:81002 Description:Urinalysis nonauto w/o scope Average Price:$17.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.62

HCPCS Code Definitions

51798
Measurement of post-voiding residual urine and/or bladder capacity by ultrasound, non-imaging
52000
Cystourethroscopy (separate procedure)
52000
Cystourethroscopy (separate procedure)
99202
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 20 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99202
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 20 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99212
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused history; A problem focused examination; Straightforward medical decision making. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are self limited or minor. Typically, 10 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1346258068
Diagnostic Radiology
675
1285643957
Diagnostic Radiology
549
1376527002
Family Practice
512
1063458339
Family Practice
432
1710948237
Pathology
261
1962442590
Hand Surgery
228
1487623773
Interventional Radiology
225
1558322461
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
161
1083683031
Diagnostic Radiology
157
1386795227
Urology
144
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Lloyd has made to other doctors

Publications

The Use of Medical Expulsive Therapy During Pregnancy: A Worldwide Perspective Among Experts. - Journal of endourology / Endourological Society
Medical expulsive therapy (MET) is a pharmacologic approach thought to augment the spontaneous passage of ureteral calculi. The usage of MET pharmacologics for presumed ureteral calculi during pregnancy has not been studied and their safety and utility are unknown. We sought to characterize the worldwide usage of MET in the setting of pregnancy with presumed ureteral calculus (P-MET), as well as factors associated with physician use. Experts in stone management were specifically sought.A nine-question survey was delivered through society-administered e-mail. Questions gathered physician's worldwide region, degree of specialization in stone disease, practice type, interval since training, and willingness to use both MET and P-MET. We assessed drugs of choice in those using P-MET and reasons for avoidance in non-P-MET users. Finally, we assessed the impact of physician-perceived medicolegal risk on usage of P-MET.Five hundred sixty-five responses were recorded. Sixty-three percent were US-based practitioners and the remaining represented a worldwide distribution. Worldwide usage of MET was 97.6%, and tamsulosin was globally preferred by over 90% of urologists. P-MET was endorsed by only 44.3%. 23.6% of European practitioners used this strategy compared with 51.1% of US physicians. Time from training and practice type did not significantly interact with adoption of P-MET; experts were less likely to use P-MET. Physician nonuse of MET during pregnancy was adverse outcome related: 76.7% reported either the fear of legal risk (52.8%) or concerns about safety (23.9%).Respondents report impressive worldwide adoption of MET. P-MET is less trusted, and fears of legal risk and safety far outweigh questions about effectiveness. The effectiveness of drugs during pregnancy-induced ureteral dilation is unknown. Still, 44% of global respondents embrace usage of this drug strategy despite a paucity of evidence supporting either safety or effectiveness during pregnancy.
Analysis of a large single-center experience with robot-assisted pyeloplasty. - International journal of urology : official journal of the Japanese Urological Association
To report a single-center experience with robot-assisted pyeloplasty.Medical records of 100 consecutive robot-assisted pyeloplasty cases carried out between May 2004 and August 2010 were retrospectively reviewed, and major perioperative parameters were recorded. Patients underwent functional (renal scan) and/or anatomical (ultrasound or computerized tomoghraphy) imaging at 6 months.The mean patient age was 39.8 years. A total of 12 patients underwent prior attempts at repair. Ureteral stents were placed in all patients except one, and closed-suction drains were placed in 59 patients. There were two intraoperative complications and two postoperative complications requiring surgical intervention. One patient with a complex prior surgical history developed a urine leak that was managed with prolonged drainage. A total of 42 patients were discharged on postoperative day 1, and 44 were discharged on postoperative day 2. Mean length of follow up was 22.8 months. The operative success rate was 96%.The majority of patients undergoing robot-assisted pyeloplasty can expect a short hospitalization with minimal morbidity. The operative success rate is high, even in patients with prior attempts at repair. Complication rates including urine leaks are quite low, and routine placement of a closed-suction drain is likely to be unnecessary.© 2012 The Japanese Urological Association.
Renal trauma from recreational accidents manifests different injury patterns than urban renal trauma. - The Journal of urology
The majority of blunt renal trauma is a consequence of motor vehicle collisions and falls. Prior publications based on urban series have shown that significant renal injuries are almost always accompanied by gross hematuria alone or microscopic hematuria with concomitant hypotension. We present a series of blunt renal trauma sustained during recreational pursuits, and describe the mechanisms, injury patterns and management.Database review from 1996 to 2009 identified 145 renal injuries. Children younger than age 16 years, and trauma involving licensable motor vehicles, penetrating injuries and work related injuries were excluded from analysis. Grade, hematuria, hypotension, age, gender, laterality, mechanism, management, injury severity score and associated injuries were recorded.We identified 106 patients meeting the criteria and 85% of the injuries were snow sport related. Age range was 16 to 76 years and 92.5% of patients were male. There were 39 grade 1 injuries, 30 grade 2, 22 grade 3, 12 grade 4 and 3 grade 5 injuries. Gross hematuria was present in 56.7%, 77.2% and 83.3% of grade 2, grade 3 and grade 4 injuries, respectively. None of the patients with grade 2 or greater injuries and microscopic hematuria had hypotension except 1 grade 5 pedicle injury. The nephrectomy and renorrhaphy rate for grade 1 to grade 4 injuries was 0%.Compared to urban series of blunt renal trauma, recreationally acquired injuries appear to follow different patterns, including a paucity of associated injuries or hypotension. If imaging were limited to the presence of gross hematuria, or microscopic hematuria with hypotension, 23% of grade 2 to grade 4 injuries would be missed. Men are at higher risk than women. However, operative intervention is rarely helpful.Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Endoscopic removal of a retained intravesical tampon using lubricant. - Journal of endourology / Endourological Society
An intravesical foreign body can be a true urologic challenge when endoscopic removal of the object is initially unsuccessful. There are few reports in the literature regarding techniques to assist endoscopic removal without resorting to open cystostomy. We present a novel technique for the removal of an intravesical tampon via use of a water-based lubricant and a resectoscope.
An unusual cause of an enhancing retroperitoneal mass. - Urology
We report an important and unusual cause of an enhancing retroperitoneal paracaval mass. Ten years after vena cava filter (VCF) placement, a 3.5-cm mass was found juxtaposed to the right kidney and vena cava. Open exploration demonstrated a venous variceal mass with perforation of the VCF through the wall of the vena cava, requiring vena cava resection and graft replacement. This is an infrequently described, potentially misleading and dangerous complication of vena cava filters. Better guidelines for such filters would be useful. We recommend an open approach in settings that could require similarly complex reconstructions.Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Pelvic angiomyolipoma. - Urology
Angiomyolipoma is a rare benign tumor most commonly found in the kidney and, infrequently, extrarenally. We report a case of pelvic angiomyolipoma in a male patient without stigmata of tuberous sclerosis. The patient presented with right retroperitoneal bleeding and was found to have bilateral renal angiomyolipomas as well as a pelvic mass with similar appearance as the other lesions. He underwent urgent embolization of the large right angiomyolipoma and subsequent robot-assisted left laparoscopic partial nephrectomy with simultaneous resection of the pelvic mass, which was well-tolerated. Pathology confirmed what is, to our knowledge, the only reported case of pelvic angiomyolipoma.Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Autonomic nervous system overactivity in men with lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. - The Journal of urology
The relationship of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) to objective measures of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), such as prostatic size and urodynamic parameters, has proved difficult to evaluate. Studies in animal models of BPH suggest that autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity is an important determinant of prostatic growth. We investigated the relationship of ANS activity to LUTS as well as to objective measures of BPH in men with BPH.This study was done in 3,047 men with LUTS secondary to BPH during screening for enrolment at 1 center in a large, multicenter, double-blind, placebo controlled trial designed to assess the long-term effects of medical therapy on BPH progression. A total of 38 men with an American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score of 8 or greater and a maximum urinary flow rate of 4 to less than 15 ml per second had ANS activity assessed based on heart rate, blood pressure, the response to circulatory stress via tilt table, and plasma and urinary catecholamine. These ANS related variables were compared with subjective measures of LUTS (AUA symptom score, quality of life score and BPH impact index), overall health measures (RAND 36-Item Health Survey) and objective clinical measures of BPH (prostate size, post-void residual volume and maximum urinary flow rate). Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated for each ANS variable vs each LUTS and BPH variable. These correlations were further assessed using stepwise multiple regression analysis to determine which BPH and LUTS variables were independently related to the ANS variable. Relationships that were identified as significant then underwent final multiple regression analysis together with control variables to exclude known extraneous and confounding influences on ANS activity.After adjusting for extrinsic influences on ANS activity AUA symptom score (p <0.01), BPH impact index score (p <0.001) and quality of life score (p <0.05) were independently associated with the change in systolic and diastolic blood pressure 1 and 5 minutes after tilt. Additionally, prostate transition zone volume (p <0.001) and the RAND 36-Item Health Survey mental subscale score (p <0.001) were independently associated with the plasma norepinephrine response to tilt.ANS hyperactivity is significantly associated with the most commonly used measures of LUTS, namely AUA symptom score and BPH impact index score. Also, the magnitude of the serum norepinephrine increase after tilt predicts prostate size. These relationships persist after controlling for extrinsic influences on ANS activity. The current findings may have important implications concerning the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying or influencing LUTS as well as its optimal treatment in men with BPH.
The New Age of Prostatitis. - Current infectious disease reports
Prostatitis has long been a poorly understood and poorly characterized entity. Characterized in 1980 as a "wastebasket of clinical ignorance," it has only recently begun to be studied effectively. Prostatitis represents over 2 million medical office visits per year in the United States, and is the diagnosis given to 8% of urology clinic patients. Its prevalence may be as high as 10% among the male population at large. Sufferers report a sickness impact of prostatitis that is similar to myocardial infarction or Crohn's disease. Less than 10% of cases of prostatitis are easily demonstrable to have a bacterial cause; these respond to conventional antimicrobial treatment. The etiology, pathogenesis, and optimum treatment for the remaining 90% of sufferers of this disease complex are quite unclear. Application of clinical research techniques and molecular biology promise new insight into this challenging and difficult problem.

Map & Directions

1 S Park St Madison, WI 53715
View Directions In Google Maps

Nearby Doctors

202 S Park St
Madison, WI 53715
608 176-6236
202 S Park St
Madison, WI 53715
608 176-6236
202 S Park St
Madison, WI 53715
608 178-8144
202 S Park St
Madison, WI 53715
608 176-6667
202 S Park St
Madison, WI 53715
608 176-6236
700 S Park St Dean St. Mary's Outpatient Center
Madison, WI 53715
608 602-2900
1025 Regent St
Madison, WI 53715
608 822-2000
1025 Regent St
Madison, WI 53715
608 828-8000
1313 Fish Hatchery Rd Dean Medical Center
Madison, WI 53715
608 528-8000