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Dr. Warren  Dunn  Md image

Dr. Warren Dunn Md

621 Science Dr
Madison WI 53711
608 638-8850
Medical School: University Of South Florida College Of Medicine - 1997
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: 61118-20
NPI: 1063509180
Taxonomy Codes:
207X00000X 207XX0005X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Warren Dunn is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:20610 Description:Drain/inject joint/bursa Average Price:$258.30 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$42.40
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$239.79 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$70.39
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$163.41 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$47.10
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$160.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$65.52

HCPCS Code Definitions

20610
Arthrocentesis, aspiration and/or injection; major joint or bursa (eg, shoulder, hip, knee joint, subacromial bursa)
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1558322065
Ophthalmology
64
1467420950
Diagnostic Radiology
59
1841268745
Diagnostic Radiology
49
1043297096
Diagnostic Radiology
37
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Dunn has made to other doctors

Publications

2013 Neer Award: predictors of failure of nonoperative treatment of chronic, symptomatic, full-thickness rotator cuff tears. - Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery
The purpose of this study is to help define the indications for rotator cuff repair by identifying predictors of failure of nonoperative treatment.A prospective, multicenter, cohort study design was used. All patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears on magnetic resonance imaging were offered participation. Baseline data from this cohort were used to examine risk factors for failing a standard rehabilitation protocol. Patients who underwent surgery were defined as failing nonoperative treatment. A Cox proportional hazards model was fit to determinethe baseline factors that predicted failure. The dependent variable was time to surgery. The independent variables were tear severity and baseline patient factors: age, activity level, body mass index, sex, Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation score, visual analog scale score for pain, education, handedness, comorbidities, duration of symptoms, strength, employment, smoking status, and patient expectations.Of the 433 subjects in this study, 87 underwent surgery with 93% follow-up at 1 year and 88% follow-up at 2 years. The median age was 62 years, and 49% were female patients. Multivariate modeling, adjusted for the covariates listed previously, identified patient expectations regarding physical therapy (P < .0001) as the strongest predictor of surgery. Higher activity level (P = .011) and not smoking (P = .023) were also significant predictors of surgery.A patient's decision to undergo surgery is influenced more by low expectations regarding the effectiveness of physical therapy than by patient symptoms or anatomic features of the rotator cuff tear. As such, patient symptoms and anatomic features of the chronic rotator cuff tear may not be the best features to use when deciding on surgical intervention.Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
What factors are predictors of emotional health in patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears? - Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery
The importance of emotional and psychological factors in treatment of patients with rotator cuff disease has been recently emphasized. Our goal was to establish factors most predictive of poor emotional health in patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears (FTRCTs).In 2007, we began to prospectively collect data on patients with symptomatic, atraumatic FTRCTs. All patients completed a questionnaire collecting data on demographics, symptom characteristics, comorbidities, willingness to undergo surgery, and patient-related outcomes (12-Item Short Form Health Survey, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index [WORC], Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation score, Shoulder Activity Scale). Physicians recorded physical examination and imaging data. To evaluate the predictors of lower WORC emotion scores, a linear multiple regression model was fit.Baseline data for 452 patients were used for analysis. In patients with symptomatic FTRCTs, the factors most predictive of worse WORC emotion scores were higher levels of pain (interquartile range odds ratio, -18.9; 95% confidence interval, -20.2 to -11.6; P < .0001) and lower Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation scores (rating of percentage normal that patients perceive their shoulder to be; interquartile range odds ratio, 6.2; 95% confidence interval, 2.5-9.95; P = .0012). Higher education (P = .006) and unemployment status (P = .0025) were associated with higher WORC emotion scores.Education level, employment status, pain levels, and patient perception of percentage of shoulder normalcy were most predictive of emotional health in patients with FTRCTs. Structural data, such astendon tear size, were not. Those with poor emotional health may perceive their shoulder to be worse than others and experience more pain. This may allow us to better optimize patient outcomes with nonoperative and operative treatment of rotator cuff tears.Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Outcomes of ACL Reconstruction in Patients with Diabetes. - Medicine and science in sports and exercise
Diabetes has been associated with adverse outcomes after various types of surgery. There are no previously published data regarding the effect of diabetes on outcomes from anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). The purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that diabetes is associated with worse clinical outcomes and a higher prevalence of subsequent surgeries after ACLR.Anterior cruciate ligament-deficient patients (n = 2198) undergoing unilateral ACLR from a multicenter prospective study were included. Patients who self-reported diabetes on the basis of comorbidity questions before surgery were identified from the database. They were compared with the remainder of the cohort who did not self-report diabetes. All patients were followed up for a minimum of 2 yr after their index surgery. A minimum 2-yr follow-up was attained on 1905/2198 (87%) via completed outcome questionnaires and 2096/2198 (95%) regarding subsequent surgery. The primary outcome measures were three validated outcome instruments. The secondary outcome measure was the incidence of additional surgery on the ipsilateral and contralateral knees.Patients with diabetes had a significantly higher activity level at 2 yr (OR = 2.96; 95% CI, 1.30-6.77; P = 0.01), but otherwise slightly worse clinical outcomes, compared with patients without diabetes (OR range = 0.42-0.59). The prevalence of subsequent surgeries in patients with diabetes was not significantly different from the prevalence in patients without diabetes.Patients with diabetes maintain a higher activity level after ACLR despite slightly lower patient-reported outcome scores compared with patients without diabetes and do not have a higher rate of subsequent surgery.
The virtual institution: cross-sectional length of stay in general adult and forensic psychiatry beds. - International journal of mental health systems
Length of stay in psychiatric hospitals interests health service planners, economists and clinicians. At a systems level it is preferable to study general adult and forensic psychiatric beds together since these are likely to be inter-dependent. We examined whether patients were placed according to specialist need or according to their cross-sectional length of stay.A one night census of all registered mental nursing home (RMNH) beds was carried out for a defined catchment area of 1.2 m population in north London in November 1999. This included all public sector psychiatric hospital beds, independent sector and forensic beds in and outside the catchment area. Cross-sectional length of stay was defined as time since the date of admission from the community. Log rank (Mantel-Cox) Chi squared was used to test for differences between groups and hierarchical logistic regression for statistical modelling.There were 1,085 occupied psychiatric beds. Cross-sectional LOS was greater than 365 days in 43.5%. Forensic beds had longer cross-sectional LOS than general beds. LOS increased with the level of therapeutic security from open through low, medium and high secure. Cross-sectional LOS was shorter for open hospital beds than community RMNH beds, shorter for informal patients than those detained under civil mental health law, and longest for forensic detentions. Longest cross-sectional LOS were for patients placed in RMNHs in the community, 10.7% of whom were 'forensic' as were 25.4% of low secure patients. Designated length of stay (acute, rehab/medium term and long term) was also associated with increasing cross-sectional LOS. In regression analysis only three variables contributed to a model of cross-sectional LOS, commissioning status (general or forensic), designated length of stay and designated level of therapeutic security.Studying cross-sectional LOS for whole systems (all psychiatric beds) is essential for operational health service management. At the time of this survey 'forensic' status was the main way of accessing long term high dependency places. This has been an organic development over time, a response to patient needs rather than the outcome of any specific policy or plan.
Baseline predictors of health-related quality of life after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a longitudinal analysis of a multicenter cohort at two and six years. - The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume
Limited information exists regarding predictors of general quality of life following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with up to six-year follow-up. We hypothesized that certain variables evaluated at the time of ACL reconstruction will predict the general quality of life as measured by the Short Form-36 (SF-36).All unilateral ACL reconstructions from 2002 to 2004 in patients currently enrolled in a prospective multicenter cohort were evaluated. Patients preoperatively completed the SF-36 validated outcome instrument. Surgeons documented intra-articular pathological conditions and treatment, as well as the ACL reconstruction surgical technique. At baseline and at a minimum of two and six years postoperatively, patients completed the SF-36. Longitudinal analysis was performed for the two-year and six-year end points.Of the initial 1512 subjects, at least one follow-up questionnaire was obtained from 1411 subjects (93%). The cohort was 44% female, and the median patient age at enrollment was twenty-three years. The mean scores were 41.9 points for the Physical Component Summary (PCS) and 51.7 points for the Mental Component Summary (MCS) at baseline, 53.6 points for the PCS and 52.0 points for the MCS at two years, and 54.0 points for the PCS and 52.4 points for the MCS at six years. Significant predictors of a higher PCS score were a higher baseline PCS score, younger age, lower baseline body mass index, having >50% of the lateral meniscus excised, or having no treatment done on a lateral meniscal tear. In contrast, significant predictors of a lower PCS score were a shorter follow-up time since surgery, revision ACL reconstruction, smoking at baseline, fewer years of education, and chondromalacia of the lateral tibial plateau. The mean utility gained at six years after ACL reconstruction was 5.3 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs).Large improvements in the PCS (with an effect size of 1.2) were noted at two years and were maintained at six years after ACL reconstruction. Lower education and smoking were significant predictors of lower PCS and MCS scores. ACL reconstruction resulted in a relatively high gain of QALYs.Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.
The Impact of the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) Research on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Orthopaedic Practice. - The Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
With an estimated 200,000 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions performed annually in the United States, there is an emphasis on determining patient-specific information to help educate patients on expected clinically relevant outcomes. The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network consortium was created in 2002 to enroll and longitudinally follow a large population cohort of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. The study group has enrolled >4,400 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions from seven institutions to establish the large level I prospective anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction outcomes cohort. The group has become more than a database with information regarding anterior cruciate ligament injuries; it has helped to establish a new benchmark for conducting multicenter, multisurgeon orthopaedic research. The changes in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction practice resulting from the group include the use of autograft for high school, college, and competitive athletes in their primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Other modifications include treatment options for meniscus and cartilage injuries, as well as lifestyle choices made after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.Copyright 2015 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.
Sensitivity of standing radiographs to detect knee arthritis: a systematic review of Level I studies. - Arthroscopy : the journal of arthroscopic & related surgery : official publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association
The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review of the available literature to define the level of quality evidence for determining the sensitivity and specificity of different radiographic views in detecting knee osteoarthritis and to determine the impact of different grading systems on the ability to detect knee osteoarthritis.A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify studies that evaluated the standing anteroposterior (AP) and 45° posteroanterior (PA) views for tibiofemoral and patellofemoral arthritis and those comparing the use of the Kellgren-Lawrence versus the joint space narrowing (JSN) radiographic grading systems using arthroscopy as the gold standard. A comprehensive search of PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, the Cochrane Database, Clinicaltrial.gov, and EMBASE was performed using the keywords "osteoarthritis," "knee," "x-ray," "sensitivity," and "arthroscopy."Six studies were included in the evaluation. The 45° flexion PA view showed a higher sensitivity than the standing AP view for detecting severe arthritis involving either the medial or lateral tibiofemoral compartment. There was no difference in the specificities for the 2 views. The direct comparison of the Kellgren-Lawrence and the JSN radiographic grading systems found no clinical difference between the 2 systems regarding the sensitivities, although the specificity was greater for the JSN system.The ability to detect knee osteoarthritis continues to be difficult without using advanced imaging. However, as an inexpensive screening tool, the 45° flexion PA view is more sensitive than the standing AP view to detect severe tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. When evaluating the radiograph for severe osteoarthritis using either the Kellgren-Lawrence or JSN grading system, there is no clinical difference in the sensitivity between the 2 methods; however, the JSN may be more specific for ruling in severe osteoarthritis in the medial compartment.Level I, systematic review of Level I studies.Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Mapping the articular contact area of the long head of the biceps tendon on the humeral head. - Anatomy research international
The purpose of this investigation was to calculate the contact surface area of the long head of the biceps (LHB) in neutral position and abduction. We sought to determine whether the LHB articulates with the humeral head in a consistent pattern comparing articular contact area in neutral position and abduction. Eleven fresh frozen matched cadaveric shoulders were analyzed. The path of the biceps tendon on the articular surface of the humeral head and the total articular surface were digitized using a MicronTracker 2 H3-60 three-dimensional optical tracker. Contact surface area was significantly less in abduction than in neutral position (P = 0.002) with a median ratio of 41% (36%, 47.5%). Ratios of contact area in neutral position to full articular surface area were consistent between left and right shoulders (rho = 1, P = 0.017) as were ratios of abduction area to full articular surface area (rho = 0.97, P = 0.005). The articular contact surface area is significantly greater in neutral position than abduction. The ratios of articular contact surface areas to total humeral articular surface areas have a narrow range and are consistent between left and right shoulders of the same cadaver.
Symptoms of pain do not correlate with rotator cuff tear severity: a cross-sectional study of 393 patients with a symptomatic atraumatic full-thickness rotator cuff tear. - The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume
For many orthopaedic disorders, symptoms correlate with disease severity. The objective of this study was to determine if pain level is related to the severity of rotator cuff disorders.A cohort of 393 subjects with an atraumatic symptomatic full-thickness rotator-cuff tear treated with physical therapy was studied. Baseline pretreatment data were used to examine the relationship between the severity of rotator cuff disease and pain. Disease severity was determined by evaluating tear size, retraction, superior humeral head migration, and rotator cuff muscle atrophy. Pain was measured on the 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) in the patient-reported American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score. A linear multiple regression model was constructed with use of the continuous VAS score as the dependent variable and measures of rotator cuff tear severity and other nonanatomic patient factors as the independent variables. Forty-eight percent of the patients were female, and the median age was sixty-one years. The dominant shoulder was involved in 69% of the patients. The duration of symptoms was less than one month for 8% of the patients, one to three months for 22%, four to six months for 20%, seven to twelve months for 15%, and more than a year for 36%. The tear involved only the supraspinatus in 72% of the patients; the supraspinatus and infraspinatus, with or without the teres minor, in 21%; and only the subscapularis in 7%. Humeral head migration was noted in 16%. Tendon retraction was minimal in 48%, midhumeral in 34%, glenohumeral in 13%, and to the glenoid in 5%. The median baseline VAS pain score was 4.4.Multivariable modeling, controlling for other baseline factors, identified increased comorbidities (p = 0.002), lower education level (p = 0.004), and race (p = 0.041) as the only significant factors associated with pain on presentation. No measure of rotator cuff tear severity correlated with pain (p > 0.25).Anatomic features defining the severity of atraumatic rotator cuff tears are not associated with the pain level. Factors associated with pain are comorbidities, lower education level, and race.Prognostic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Early Reconstruction Versus Rehabilitation and Delayed Reconstruction for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears. - The American journal of sports medicine
An initial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear can be treated with surgical reconstruction or focused rehabilitation. The KANON (Knee Anterior cruciate ligament, NON-surgical versus surgical treatment) randomized controlled trial compared rehabilitation plus early ACL reconstruction (ACLR) to rehabilitation plus optional delayed ACLR and found no difference at 2 years by an intention-to-treat analysis of total Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) results.To compare the cost-effectiveness of early versus delayed ACLR.Economic and decision analysis; Level of evidence, 2.A Markov decision model was constructed for a cost-utility analysis of early reconstruction (ER) versus rehabilitation plus optional delayed reconstruction (DR). Outcome probabilities and effectiveness were derived from 2 sources: the KANON study and the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) database. Collectively, these 2 sources provided data from 928 ACL-injured patients. Utilities were measured by the Short Form-6 dimensions (SF-6D). Costs were estimated from a societal perspective in 2012 US dollars. Costs and utilities were discounted in accordance with the United States Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine. Effectiveness was expressed in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained. Principal outcome measures were average incremental costs, incremental effectiveness (as measured by QALYs), and net health benefits. Willingness to pay was set at $50,000, which is the currently accepted standard in the United States.In the base case, the ER group resulted in an incremental gain of 0.28 QALYs over the DR group, with a corresponding lower overall cost to society of $1572. Effectiveness gains were driven by the low utility of an unstable knee and the lower utility for the DR group. The cost of rehabilitation and the rate of additional surgery drove the increased cost of the DR group. The most sensitive variable was the rate of knee instability after initial rehabilitation. When the rate of instability falls to 51.5%, DR is less costly, and when the rate of instability falls below 18.0%, DR becomes the preferred cost-effective strategy.An economic analysis of the timing of ACLR using data exclusively from the KANON trial, MOON cohort, and national average reimbursement revealed that early ACLR was more effective (improved QALYs) at a lower cost than rehabilitation plus optional delayed ACLR. Therefore, early ACLR should be the preferred treatment strategy from a societal health system perspective.© 2014 The Author(s).

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