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Dr. Michael  Field  Md image

Dr. Michael Field Md

600 Highland Ave
Madison WI 53792
608 631-1530
Medical School: Johns Hopkins University School Of Medicine - 2000
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #: 56575
NPI: 1033192802
Taxonomy Codes:
207RC0000X 207RC0001X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Michael Field is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:93651 Description:Ablate heart dysrhythm focus Average Price:$6,916.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$843.81
HCPCS Code:93621 Description:Electrophysiology evaluation Average Price:$5,501.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$108.94
HCPCS Code:93620 Description:Electrophysiology evaluation Average Price:$4,784.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$301.24
HCPCS Code:33208 Description:Insrt heart pm atrial & vent Average Price:$4,022.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$486.96
HCPCS Code:93613 Description:Electrophys map 3d add-on Average Price:$3,731.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$363.60
HCPCS Code:93623 Description:Stimulation pacing heart Average Price:$2,236.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$148.27
HCPCS Code:93284 Description:Icd device progr eval mult Average Price:$534.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$61.26
HCPCS Code:93295 Description:Icd device interrogat remote Average Price:$466.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$63.37
HCPCS Code:93282 Description:Icd device prog eval 1 sngl Average Price:$332.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$41.25
HCPCS Code:99205 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$428.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$156.71
HCPCS Code:93280 Description:Pm device progr eval dual Average Price:$305.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$37.88
HCPCS Code:93294 Description:Pm device interrogate remote Average Price:$297.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$32.02
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$383.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$128.22
HCPCS Code:93279 Description:Pm device progr eval sngl Average Price:$255.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$31.83
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$316.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$103.83
HCPCS Code:99204 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$320.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$121.96
HCPCS Code:99221 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$285.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$94.52
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$202.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$67.75
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$202.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$73.83
HCPCS Code:93293 Description:Pm phone r-strip device eval Average Price:$118.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$15.00
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$134.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$48.04

HCPCS Code Definitions

33208
Insertion of new or replacement of permanent pacemaker with transvenous electrode(s); atrial and ventricular
93282
Programming device evaluation (in person) with iterative adjustment of the implantable device to test the function of the device and select optimal permanent programmed values with analysis, review and report by a physician or other qualified health care professional; single lead implantable cardioverter-defibrillator system
93279
Programming device evaluation (in person) with iterative adjustment of the implantable device to test the function of the device and select optimal permanent programmed values with analysis, review and report by a physician or other qualified health care professional; single lead pacemaker system
93280
Programming device evaluation (in person) with iterative adjustment of the implantable device to test the function of the device and select optimal permanent programmed values with analysis, review and report by a physician or other qualified health care professional; dual lead pacemaker system
93284
Programming device evaluation (in person) with iterative adjustment of the implantable device to test the function of the device and select optimal permanent programmed values with analysis, review and report by a physician or other qualified health care professional; multiple lead implantable cardioverter-defibrillator system
93294
Interrogation device evaluation(s) (remote), up to 90 days; single, dual, or multiple lead pacemaker system with interim analysis, review(s) and report(s) by a physician or other qualified health care professional
93293
Transtelephonic rhythm strip pacemaker evaluation(s) single, dual, or multiple lead pacemaker system, includes recording with and without magnet application with analysis, review and report(s) by a physician or other qualified health care professional, up to 90 days
93295
Interrogation device evaluation(s) (remote), up to 90 days; single, dual, or multiple lead implantable cardioverter-defibrillator system with interim analysis, review(s) and report(s) by a physician or other qualified health care professional
93613
Intracardiac electrophysiologic 3-dimensional mapping (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
93620
Comprehensive electrophysiologic evaluation including insertion and repositioning of multiple electrode catheters with induction or attempted induction of arrhythmia; with right atrial pacing and recording, right ventricular pacing and recording, His bundle recording
93621
Comprehensive electrophysiologic evaluation including insertion and repositioning of multiple electrode catheters with induction or attempted induction of arrhythmia; with left atrial pacing and recording from coronary sinus or left atrium (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
93623
Programmed stimulation and pacing after intravenous drug infusion (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
99204
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 45 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99205
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 60 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99221
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed or comprehensive history; A detailed or comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of low severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1649246687
Internal Medicine
2,429
1013995281
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
2,115
1164487591
Cardiac Electrophysiology
768
1639186463
Diagnostic Radiology
706
1013998715
Family Practice
692
1679540207
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
593
1558322461
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
452
1548236581
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
435
1700848967
Geriatric Medicine
422
1881621803
Internal Medicine
416
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Field has made to other doctors

Publications

Characteristics of VT Ablation in Patients with Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices. - Circulation. Arrhythmia and electrophysiology
-Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are increasingly used as a bridge to cardiac transplantation or as destination therapy. Patients with LVADs are at high risk for ventricular arrhythmias (VA). This study describes VA characteristics and ablation in patients implanted with a Heart Mate 2 (HM2) device.-All patients with a HM2 device who underwent VA catheter ablation at 9 tertiary centers were included. Thirty-four patients (30 male, age 58 ± 10 years) underwent 39 ablation procedures. The underlying cardiomyopathy etiology was ischemic in 21 and non-ischemic in 13 patients with a mean left ventricular ejection fraction of 17±5% before LVAD implantation. One hundred and ten ventricular tachycardias (VTs) (cycle lengths: 230-740ms, arrhythmic storm n=28) and 2 ventricular fibrillation triggers were targeted (25 transseptal, 14 retrograde aortic approaches). Nine patients required VT ablation <1 month after LVAD implantation due to intractable VT. Only 10/110 (9%) of the targeted VTs were related to the HM2 cannula. During follow-up, 7 patients were transplanted and 10 died. Of the remaining 17 patients, 13 were arrhythmia-free at 25 ± 15 months. In 1 patient with VT recurrence, change of turbine speed from 9400 to 9000 rpm extinguished VT.-Catheter ablation of VT among LVAD recipients is feasible and reasonably safe even soon after LVAD implantation. Intrinsic myocardial scar, rather than the apical cannula, appears to be the dominant substrate.
Mutations in the intellectual disability gene KDM5C reduce protein stability and demethylase activity. - Human molecular genetics
Mutations in KDM5C are an important cause of X-linked intellectual disability in males. KDM5C encodes a histone demethylase, suggesting that alterations in chromatin landscape may contribute to disease. We used primary patient cells and biochemical approaches to investigate the effects of patient mutations on KDM5C expression, stability and catalytic activity. We report and characterize a novel nonsense mutation, c.3223delG (p.V1075Yfs*2), which leads to loss of KDM5C protein. We also characterize two KDM5C missense mutations, c.1439C>T (p.P480L) and c.1204G>T (p.D402Y) that are compatible with protein production, but compromise stability and enzymatic activity. Finally, we demonstrate that a c.2T>C mutation in the translation initiation codon of KDM5C results in translation re-start and production of a N-terminally truncated protein (p.M1_E165del) that is unstable and lacks detectable demethylase activity. Patient fibroblasts do not show global changes in histone methylation but we identify several up-regulated genes, suggesting local changes in chromatin conformation and gene expression. This thorough examination of KDM5C patient mutations demonstrates the utility of examining the molecular consequences of patient mutations on several levels, ranging from enzyme production to catalytic activity, when assessing the functional outcomes of intellectual disability mutations.© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
Response of reef corals on a fringing reef flat to elevated suspended-sediment concentrations: Moloka'i, Hawai'i. - PeerJ
A long-term (10 month exposure) experiment on effects of suspended sediment on the mortality, growth, and recruitment of the reef corals Montipora capitata and Porites compressa was conducted on the shallow reef flat off south Moloka'i, Hawai'i. Corals were grown on wire platforms with attached coral recruitment tiles along a suspended solid concentration (SSC) gradient that ranged from 37 mg l(-1) (inshore) to 3 mg l(-1) (offshore). Natural coral reef development on the reef flat is limited to areas with SSCs less than 10 mg l(-1) as previously suggested in the scientific literature. However, the experimental corals held at much higher levels of turbidity showed surprisingly good survivorship and growth. High SSCs encountered on the reef flat reduced coral recruitment by one to three orders of magnitude compared to other sites throughout Hawai'i. There was a significant correlation between the biomass of macroalgae attached to the wire growth platforms at the end of the experiment and percentage of the corals showing mortality. We conclude that lack of suitable hard substrate, macroalgal competition, and blockage of recruitment on available substratum are major factors accounting for the low natural coral coverage in areas of high turbidity. The direct impact of high turbidity on growth and mortality is of lesser importance.
A novel X-linked trichothiodystrophy associated with a nonsense mutation in RNF113A. - Journal of medical genetics
Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is a group of rare autosomal recessive disorders that variably affect a wide range of organs derived from the neuroectoderm. The key diagnostic feature is sparse, brittle, sulfur deficient hair that has a 'tiger-tail' banding pattern under polarising light microscopy.We describe two male cousins affected by TTD associated with microcephaly, profound intellectual disability, sparse brittle hair, aged appearance, short stature, facial dysmorphism, seizures, an immunoglobulin deficiency, multiple endocrine abnormalities, cerebellar hypoplasia and partial absence of the corpus callosum, in the absence of cellular photosensitivity and ichthyosis. Obligate female carriers showed 100% skewed X-chromosome inactivation. Linkage analysis and Sanger sequencing of 737 X-chromosome exons and whole exome sequencing was used to find the responsible gene and mutation.Linkage analysis localised the disease allele to a 7.75 Mb interval from Xq23-q25. We identified a nonsense mutation in the highly conserved RNF113A gene (c.901 C>T, p.Q301*). The mutation segregated with the disease in the family and was not observed in over 100 000 control X chromosomes. The mutation markedly reduced RNF113A protein expression in extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from the affected individuals.The association of RNF113A mutation with non-photosensitive TTD identifies a new locus for these disorders on the X chromosome. The extended phenotype within this family includes panhypopituitarism, cutis marmorata and congenital short oesophagus.Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
Fragile X protein in newborn dried blood spots. - BMC medical genetics
The fragile X syndrome (FXS) results from mutation of the FMR1 gene that prevents expression of its gene product, FMRP. We previously characterized 215 dried blood spots (DBS) representing different FMR1 genotypes and ages with a Luminex-based immunoassay (qFMRP). We found variable FMRP levels in the normal samples and identified affected males by the drastic reduction of FMRP.Here, to establish the variability of expression of FMRP in a larger random population we quantified FMRP in 2,000 anonymous fresh newborn DBS. We also evaluated the effect of long term storage on qFMRP by retrospectively assaying 74 aged newborn DBS that had been stored for 7-84 months that included normal and full mutation individuals. These analyses were performed on 3 mm DBS disks. To identify the alleles associated with the lowest FMRP levels in the fresh DBS, we analyzed the DNA in the samples that were more than two standard deviations below the mean.Analysis of the fresh newborn DBS revealed a broad distribution of FMRP with a mean approximately 7-fold higher than that we previously reported for fresh DBS in normal adults and no samples whose FMRP level indicated FXS. DNA analysis of the lowest FMRP DBS showed that this was the low extreme of the normal range and included a female carrying a 165 CGG repeat premutation. In the retrospective study of aged newborn DBS, the FMRP mean of the normal samples was less than 30% of the mean of the fresh DBS. Despite the degraded signal from these aged DBS, qFMRP identified the FXS individuals.The assay showed that newborn DBS contain high levels of FMRP that will allow identification of males and potentially females, affected by FXS. The assay is also an effective screening tool for aged DBS stored for up to four years.
Medical school accreditation in China: a Sino-Australian collaboration. - Medical teacher
In 2008, China established a medical school accreditation process based on international standards and guidelines. Twenty schools had been accredited by 2013 and it is intended to accredit all 137 schools by 2020. To achieve this ambitious aim, Chinese medical educators have entered into collaboration with their Australian counterparts, engendered by mutual membership of the Association for Medical Education in the Western Pacific Region, a regional division of the World Federation for Medical Education. The collaboration began in 2000 as informal discussions at regional meetings and has since developed three major components: workshops held throughout China for potential assessors and for medical schools undergoing accreditation; visits by Chinese accreditors to Australia to observe Australian Medical Council processes; and participation by Australian assessors in the accreditation of Chinese medical schools. The incremental steps that led to this unique bi-national venture are outlined in the context of other international developments in accreditation of medical education. Then, the preparation, piloting and implementation of accreditation standards and guidelines with Chinese specifications are described. Finally, the outcomes achieved thus far and the challenges remaining are discussed.
Ashkenazi Jewish population screening for Tay-Sachs disease: the international and Australian experience. - Journal of paediatrics and child health
Internationally, Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) preconception screening of Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) individuals and couples has led to effective primary prevention of TSD. In Australia, adolescent preconception genetic screening programs operate mainly in Jewish community high schools. These existing programs offer an effective means of primary prevention of TSD, are cost effective and safe. However, in the broader Australian community TSD screening is not systematically performed and cases still occur in unscreened AJ individuals. In order to improve the effectiveness of Australian screening, there is a need for definitive guidelines for healthcare professionals to facilitate extension of the proven benefits of preconception TSD screening to all AJ individuals at risk. We performed a systematic review of the relevant literature relating to AJ pre-conception and antenatal screening for TSD. The evidence was assessed using an established National Health and Medical Research Council evidence grading system. Evaluations of efficacy of TSD screening programs design and execution, cost-benefit and cost-utility health economic evaluation, and population outcomes were undertaken. The results have been used to propose a model for universal AJ TSD preconception and antenatal screening for the primary care setting.© 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
Early detection of fragile X syndrome: applications of a novel approach for improved quantitative methylation analysis in venous blood and newborn blood spots. - Clinical chemistry
Standard fragile X syndrome (FXS) diagnostic tests that target methylation of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) CpG island 5' of the CGG expansion can be used to predict severity of the disease in males from birth, but not in females.We describe methylation specific-quantitative melt analysis (MS-QMA) that targets 10 CpG sites, with 9 within FMR1 intron 1, to screen for FXS from birth in both sexes. The novel method combines the qualitative strengths of high-resolution melt and the high-throughput, quantitative real-time PCR standard curve to provide accurate quantification of DNA methylation in a single assay. Its performance was assessed in 312 control (CGG <40), 143 premutation (PM) (CGG 56-170), 197 full mutation (FM) (CGG 200-2000), and 33 CGG size and methylation mosaic samples.In male and female newborn blood spots, MS-QMA differentiated FM from control alleles, with sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values between 92% and 100%. In venous blood of FM females between 6 and 35 years of age, MS-QMA correlated most strongly with verbal IQ impairment (P = 0.002). In the larger cohort of males and females, MS-QMA correlated with reference methods Southern blot and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (P < 0.05), but was not significantly correlated with age. Unmethylated alleles in high-functioning FM and PM males determined by both reference methods were also unmethylated by MS-QMA.MS-QMA has an immediate application in FXS diagnostics, with a potential use of its quantitative methylation output for prognosis in both sexes.© 2014 The American Association for Clinical Chemistry.
De novo loss-of-function mutations in SETD5, encoding a methyltransferase in a 3p25 microdeletion syndrome critical region, cause intellectual disability. - American journal of human genetics
To identify further Mendelian causes of intellectual disability (ID), we screened a cohort of 996 individuals with ID for variants in 565 known or candidate genes by using a targeted next-generation sequencing approach. Seven loss-of-function (LoF) mutations-four nonsense (c.1195A>T [p.Lys399(∗)], c.1333C>T [p.Arg445(∗)], c.1866C>G [p.Tyr622(∗)], and c.3001C>T [p.Arg1001(∗)]) and three frameshift (c.2177_2178del [p.Thr726Asnfs(∗)39], c.3771dup [p.Ser1258Glufs(∗)65], and c.3856del [p.Ser1286Leufs(∗)84])-were identified in SETD5, a gene predicted to encode a methyltransferase. All mutations were compatible with de novo dominant inheritance. The affected individuals had moderate to severe ID with additional variable features of brachycephaly; a prominent high forehead with synophrys or striking full and broad eyebrows; a long, thin, and tubular nose; long, narrow upslanting palpebral fissures; and large, fleshy low-set ears. Skeletal anomalies, including significant leg-length discrepancy, were a frequent finding in two individuals. Congenital heart defects, inguinal hernia, or hypospadias were also reported. Behavioral problems, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, hand flapping with ritualized behavior, and autism, were prominent features. SETD5 lies within the critical interval for 3p25 microdeletion syndrome. The individuals with SETD5 mutations showed phenotypic similarity to those previously reported with a deletion in 3p25, and thus loss of SETD5 might be sufficient to account for many of the clinical features observed in this condition. Our findings add to the growing evidence that mutations in genes encoding methyltransferases regulating histone modification are important causes of ID. This analysis provides sufficient evidence that rare de novo LoF mutations in SETD5 are a relatively frequent (0.7%) cause of ID.Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Extreme growth failure is a common presentation of ligase IV deficiency. - Human mutation
Ligase IV syndrome is a rare differential diagnosis for Nijmegen breakage syndrome owing to a shared predisposition to lympho-reticular malignancies, significant microcephaly, and radiation hypersensitivity. Only 16 cases with mutations in LIG4 have been described to date with phenotypes varying from malignancy in developmentally normal individuals, to severe combined immunodeficiency and early mortality. Here, we report the identification of biallelic truncating LIG4 mutations in 11 patients with microcephalic primordial dwarfism presenting with restricted prenatal growth and extreme postnatal global growth failure (average OFC -10.1 s.d., height -5.1 s.d.). Subsequently, most patients developed thrombocytopenia and leucopenia later in childhood and many were found to have previously unrecognized immunodeficiency following molecular diagnosis. None have yet developed malignancy, though all patients tested had cellular radiosensitivity. A genotype-phenotype correlation was also noted with position of truncating mutations corresponding to disease severity. This work extends the phenotypic spectrum associated with LIG4 mutations, establishing that extreme growth retardation with microcephaly is a common presentation of bilallelic truncating mutations. Such growth failure is therefore sufficient to consider a diagnosis of LIG4 deficiency and early recognition of such cases is important as bone marrow failure, immunodeficiency, and sometimes malignancy are long term sequelae of this disorder.© 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

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