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Dr. Leyla  Gahrahmat  Md image

Dr. Leyla Gahrahmat Md

7601 Stoneridge Dr
Pleasanton CA 94588
925 475-5050
Medical School: Other - 2000
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: A81339
NPI: 1023199890
Taxonomy Codes:
207Q00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Leyla Gahrahmat is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$350.80 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$134.95
HCPCS Code:99239 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$311.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$105.94
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$305.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$108.06
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$204.94 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$71.36
HCPCS Code:99238 Description:Hospital discharge day Average Price:$201.73 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$71.77
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$203.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$73.15
HCPCS Code:93000 Description:Electrocardiogram complete Average Price:$89.20 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$19.96
HCPCS Code:96372 Description:Ther/proph/diag inj sc/im Average Price:$71.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$25.68
HCPCS Code:81003 Description:Urinalysis auto w/o scope Average Price:$16.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.18

HCPCS Code Definitions

96372
Therapeutic, prophylactic, or diagnostic injection (specify substance or drug); subcutaneous or intramuscular
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99238
Hospital discharge day management; 30 minutes or less
99239
Hospital discharge day management; more than 30 minutes
93000
Electrocardiogram, routine ECG with at least 12 leads; with interpretation and report

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1902838410
General Practice
634
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Gahrahmat has made to other doctors

Publications

A case of misdiagnose of malaria infection. - Asian Pacific journal of tropical biomedicine
A case of malaria infection in a 42-year-old woman in rural area of Mahmodabad, Mazandaran Province, North Iran was reported and discussed elaborately. She was complaining about recurrent fevers, sweating, headache and myalgia in back. After her first admission to hospital due to misdiagnose she did not receive proper treatment and the patient suffered from clinical manifestations again. Eventually in the second admission to another hospital, after a precise examination on her thick and thin blood smear the agent of disease was recognized appropriately as Plasmodium vivax and treated accordingly.
Individual and community level socioeconomic inequalities in contraceptive use in 10 Newly Independent States: a multilevel cross-sectional analysis. - International journal for equity in health
Little is known regarding the association between socioeconomic factors and contraceptive use in the Newly Independent States (NIS), countries that have experienced profound changes in reproductive health services during the transition from socialism to a market economy.Using 2005-2006 data from Demographic Health Surveys (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Moldova) and Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan), we examined associations between individual and community socioeconomic status with current modern contraceptive use (MCU) among N = 55,204 women aged 15-49 married or in a union. Individual socioeconomic status was measured using quintiles of wealth index and education level (higher than secondary school, secondary school or less). Community socioeconomic status was measured as the percentage of households in the poorest quintile of the nationals household wealth index (0%, 0-25%, or greater than 25%). We used multilevel logistic regression to estimate associations adjusted for age, number of children, urban/rural, and socioeconomic variables.MCU varied by country from 14% (in Azerbaijan) to 62% (in Belarus). Overall, women living in the poorest communities were less likely than those in the richest to use modern contraceptives (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.82, 95% Confidence Interval = 0.76, 0.89). Similarly, there was an increasing odds of MCU with increasing individual-level wealth. Women with a lower level of education also had lower odds of MCU than those with a higher level of education (aOR = .75, 95%CI = 0.71, 0.79). In country-specific analyses, community-level socioeconomic inequalities were apparent in 4 of 10 countries; in contrast, inequalities by individual-level wealth were apparent in 7 countries and by education in 8 countries. All countries in which community-level socioeconomic status was associated with MCU were in Central Asia, whereas at the individual-level inequalities of the largest magnitude were found in the Caucasus. There were no distinct patterns found in Eastern European countries.Community-level socioeconomic inequalities in MCU were most pronounced in Central Asian countries, whereas individual-level socioeconomic inequalities in MCU were most pronounced in the Caucasus. It is important to consider multilevel contextual determinants of modern contraceptive use in the development of reproductive health and family planning programs.
Is obstructive sleep apnea syndrome a risk factor for pulmonary thromboembolism? - Chinese medical journal
In many studies, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been shown to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Conversely, there are few reports establishing possible relation between OSA and venous thromboembolism (VTE). In this study, the aim is to evaluate OSA via polysomnography in patients with pulmonary embolism and drawing the attention of clinicians to the presence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may be a risk factor for pulmonary embolism.Fifty consecutive patients who were diagnosed with pulmonary embolism (PE) were evaluated prospectively for OSAS. Polysomnographic examination was conducted on 30 volunteer patients. The frequency of OSAS in PE was determined and PE cases were compared to each other after being divided into two groups based on the presence of a major risk factor.The study consisted of a total of 30 patients (14 females and 16 males). In 56.7% of the patients (17/30), OSAS was determined. The percent of cases with moderate and severe OSAS (apnea hipoapnea index > 15) was 26.7% (8/30). Patients who had pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) without any known major VTE risk (n = 20), were compared to patients with VTE risk factors (n = 10), and significantly higher rates of OSAS were seen (70% and 30% respectively; P = 0.045). The mean age of the group with major PE risk factors was lower than the group without major PE risk factors (52 years old and 66 years old, respectively; P = 0.015), however, weight was greater in the group with major PE risk factors (88 kg and 81 kg, respectively; P = 0.025). By multivariate Logistic regression analysis, in the group without any visible major risk factors, the only independent risk factor for PE was OSAS (P = 0.049).In patients with PTE, OSA rates were much higher than in the general population. Moreover, the rate for patients with clinically significant moderate and severe OSA was quite high. PTE patients with OSA symptoms (not syndromes) and without known major risk factor should be examined for OSA. There seems to be a relationship between OSA and PTE. However, whether this relationship is a causal relationship or a relationship due to common risk factors or long-term complications of OSA is not clear. Further comprehensive studies on those special topics are needed to clarify these points.
Extraction of statistical properties of the point source response of a reverberant plate and application to parameter estimation (L). - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
The point source response of a reverberant solid plate is modeled through a nonstationary Poisson process based on the image-source method. The theoretical expectation of the envelope is then derived, taking into account the dispersive nature of plate waves, and validated by numerical results. Least-square curve-fitting applied to an ensemble average over N realizations can then be used to identify useful parameters such as wave velocity, plate surface, or source-receiver distance. It is shown that even values of N down to 1 (no averaging) allow a satisfying identification. Application to the estimation of the source-receiver distance using a single sensor is finally highlighted to illustrate the promising potentialities of the measurement principle proposed.
Characterization of in vitro cultured bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells and their ability to express neurotrophic factors. - Cell biology international
MSCs (mesenchymal stem cells) have attracted attention as a promising tool for regenerative medicine and transplantation therapy. MSCs exert neuroprotective effects by secreting a number of factors in vitro and in vivo. Similar characteristics are found in ADSCs (adipose-derived stem cells) and BMSCs (bone marrow stromal cells). Multipotent capability, easy accessibility and rapid proliferation of ADSCs have been established. Our main objective was to compare cell viability, growth rate, expression of neurotrophic factors and nestin genes in ADSCs and BMSCs. Cell doubling time and proliferation rate indicate that ADSCs has a higher proliferation rate than BMSCs. ADSCs and BMSCs express a similar pattern of CD71 and CD90 markers. Nestin immunostaining showed that ADSCs and BMSCs are immunopositive. The expression of neurotrophic factors genes in ADSCs proved similar to that of BMSCs genes. Thus adipose tissue stem cells with a high proliferation rate can express nestin and neurotrophic factor genes. Therefore ADSCs may be useful in future cell replacement therapies and help improve neurodegenerative diseases.
The effect of low dose rocuronium on intraocular pressure in laryngeal mask airway usage. - Middle East journal of anaesthesiology
We have compared the effect of low dose rocuronium on intraocular pressure (IOP) in larygeal mask airway usage during induction of anesthesia using propofol and fentanyl, in a randomized, double-blind study.We studied 30 patients randomly allocated to one of two groups. Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl 1 mg kg(-1) and propofol 2 mg kg(-1) until loss of eyelash reflex. This was followed by rocuronium 0,3 mg kg(-1) (group R, n = 15) and normal saline (group S, n = 15). IOP was measured with Schiotz tonometry device preoperatively (IOP(pre)) and after propofol infection (IOP(0)) and immediately after LMA insertion (IOP(1)), 1. (IOP(2)), 2. (IOP(3)), 3. (IOP(4)), 4. (IOP(5)) and 15. (IOP(15)) minutes after laryngeal mask airway (LMA) insertion and after extubation (IOP(ext)). The collected data were heart rate (HR), oxygen saturation (SpO(2)), end-tidal carbon-dioxide pressure (ETCO(2)) and mean arterial pressure (MAP).After LMA insertion significant decrease was found in IOP in both groups. No significant difference was found between groups.Although there have been reports that LMA insertion minimally increases IOP, in our study, by using low dose rocuronium and LMA there was a decrease in IOP.
The effect of serum and intrafollicular insulin resistance parameters and homocysteine levels of nonobese, nonhyperandrogenemic polycystic ovary syndrome patients on in vitro fertilization outcome. - Fertility and sterility
To investigate the serum and follicular fluid concentrations of insulin resistance parameters and homocysteine and their effect on IVF outcome in nonobese, nonhyperandrogenemic polycystic ovary syndrome patients.Prospective study.Department of Infertility of Dr. Zekai Tahir Burak Women's Health Research and Education Hospital.Ninty-seven women underwent IVF.Subjects were categorized according to IVF indications: group 1 with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), group 2 with subfertile male partners, group 3 with unexplained infertiliy. Serum and follicular fluid parameters from the first follicle on the day of oocyte retrieval were analyzed.Serum and follicular fluid insulin resistance parameters, homocysteine, sex hormone levels, and laboratory and clinical IVF outcome were studied.Serum insulin, homeostasis model assessment estimate of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and homocysteine levels were significantly higher in subjects having PCOS. However, these significant differences in serum insulin resistance and homocysteine levels were not seen in the follicular microenvironment. There were no differences in clinical pregnancy rates between study groups.Despite elevated serum insulin, HOMA-IR, and homocysteine levels, and their effects on oocyte numbers and maturation in PCOS patients, there were no differences in follicular parameters and clinical pregnancy rates between hyperinsulinemic and hyperhomocysteinemic PCOS patients and the other two groups.Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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7601 Stoneridge Dr Pleasanton, CA 94588
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