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Dr. Alexander  Reyzelman  Dpm image

Dr. Alexander Reyzelman Dpm

2299 Post St Ste 205
San Francisco CA 94115
415 920-0638
Medical School: Other - Unknown
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: E4136
NPI: 1023192721
Taxonomy Codes:
213E00000X

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Publications

A clinical trial of Integra Template for diabetic foot ulcer treatment. - Wound repair and regeneration : official publication of the Wound Healing Society [and] the European Tissue Repair Society
Individuals with diabetes mellitus are at an increased risk of developing a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of Integra Dermal Regeneration Template (IDRT) for the treatment of nonhealing DFUs. The Foot Ulcer New Dermal Replacement Study was a multicenter, randomized, controlled, parallel group clinical trial conducted under an Investigational Device Exemption. Thirty-two sites enrolled and randomized 307 subjects with at least one DFU. Consented patients were entered into the 14-day run-in phase where they were treated with the standard of care (0.9% sodium chloride gel) plus a secondary dressing and an offloading/protective device. Patients with less than 30% reepithelialization of the study ulcer after the run-in phase were randomized into the treatment phase. The subjects were randomized to the control treatment group (0.9% sodium chloride gel; n = 153) or the active treatment group (IDRT, n = 154). The treatment phase was 16 weeks or until confirmation of complete wound closure (100% reepithelialization of the wound surface), whichever occurred first. Following the treatment phase, all subjects were followed for 12 weeks. Complete DFU closure during the treatment phase was significantly greater with IDRT treatment (51%) than control treatment (32%; p = 0.001) at sixteen weeks. The median time to complete DFU closure was 43 days for IDRT subjects and 78 days for control subjects in wounds that healed. The rate of wound size reduction was 7.2% per week for IDRT subjects vs. 4.8% per week for control subjects (p = 0.012). For the treatment of chronic DFUs, IDRT treatment decreased the time to complete wound closure, increased the rate of wound closure, improved components of quality of life and had less adverse events compared with the standard of care treatment. IDRT could greatly enhance the treatment of nonhealing DFUs.© 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.
Evidence of Intensive Autolytic Debridement With a Self-Adaptive Wound Dressing. - Wounds : a compendium of clinical research and practice
Chronic venous leg ulcers (VLUs) can be challenging to manage and heal. Despite the observed efficacy of surgical debridement, many patients with VLUs refuse the procedure due to the associated pain. Autolytic debridement induces no pain, but is slow or disrupted in chronic VLUs. Elucidation of the wound dressing functions that are sufficient to support autolytic debridement is needed.The authors report 2 challenging cases with large, nonresponsive VLUs. A 52-year-old female patient, Case 1, presented with a VLU of 91.4 cm(2) (10.5 cm x 8.7 cm); and a 58-year-old female patient, Case 2, presented with bilateral VLUs, the larger of which was 50 cm(2) (10 cm x 5 cm). Both VLU cases were covered with yellow slough, and case 1 had a small area of black necrotic tissue. The patients had received standard care for more than 16 months, but their VLUs were worsening. A self-adaptive wound dressing (SAWD) with a compression wrap was applied 2 to 3 times a week.Within 21 days, the VLUs of both cases had shed the yellow slough, and healthy granulation tissue was visible.In summary, the SAWD removed excess exudate with liquefied components of slough and nonvital tissue; provided sufficient moisture for preventing wound desiccation; sequestered microorganisms, thereby blocking their multiplication; and supported efficient autolytic debridement, clearing most of the slough and all crusted necrotic tissue within 3 weeks. The effect of SAWD on autolytic debridement is a promising mechanism for promoting healing of VLUs and warrants further study.
A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Treatment of Venous Leg Ulcers Using Mechanically Versus Electrically Powered Negative Pressure Wound Therapy. - Advances in wound care
Objective: This study compares two different negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) modalities in the treatment of venous leg ulcers (VLUs), the ultraportable mechanically powered (MP) Smart Negative Pressure (SNaP(®)) Wound Care System to the electrically powered (EP) Vacuum-Assisted Closure (V.A.C.(®)) System. Approach: Patients with VLUs from 13 centers participated in this prospective randomized controlled trial. Each subject was randomly assigned to treatment with either MP NPWT or EP NPWT and evaluated for 16 weeks or complete wound closure. Results: Forty patients (n=19 MP NPWT and n=21 EP NPWT) completed the study. Primary endpoint analysis of wound size reduction found wounds in the MP NPWT group had significantly greater wound size reduction than those in the EP NPWT group at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks (p-value=0.0039, 0.0086, 0.0002, and 0.0005, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analyses showed greater acceleration in complete wound closure in the MP NPWT group. At 30 days, 50% wound closure was achieved in 52.6% (10/19) of patients treated with MP NPWT and 23.8% (5/21) of patients treated with EP NPWT. At 90 days, complete wound closure was achieved in 57.9% (11/19) of patients treated with MP NPWT and 38.15% (8/21) of patients treated with EP NPWT. Innovation: These data support the use of MP-NPWT for the treatment of VLUs. Conclusions: In this group of venous ulcers, wounds treated with MP NPWT demonstrated greater improvement and a higher likelihood of complete wound closure than those treated with EP NPWT.
Initial clinical assessment of a novel multifunctional topical ointment for difficult-to-heal wounds: a case series. - Advances in skin & wound care
Chronic wounds are characterized by prolonged inflammation, bacterial bioburden, and ischemia. These factors represent the barriers to wound healing that need to be addressed in order to achieve wound closure. The authors performed the initial clinical testing of WinVivo Wound Ointment ("WinVivo"), a novel topical ointment containing several botanicals that have been previously shown to promote favorable wound environment and advance wound healing. In this series of 13 patients with difficult-to-heal lower-extremity wounds, WinVivo was well tolerated and demonstrated the ability to simultaneously support granulation tissue formation; decrease the amount of exudate, edema, and malodor; and reduce pain. The ulcers included in this study have been present for a minimum of 3 weeks and a maximum of 5 years prior to the start of treatment with WinVivo. Eight of 13 wounds have previously been treated with at least 1 type of advanced wound healing modality, such as dermal substitutes or negative-pressure wound therapy. Treatment with WinVivo lasted for 3 to 12 weeks and resulted in a mean 88% wound closure, with 4 wounds healing completely. In addition to significant reduction in wound size, all patients have exhibited other clinical benefits, suggesting overall improvement in wound conditions. Future studies in a larger population, as well as case-control studies comparing WinVivo with a standard of care, are therefore warranted to further evaluate the efficacy of this new treatment.
NorLeu3-A(1-7) stimulation of diabetic foot ulcer healing: results of a randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 clinical trial. - Wound repair and regeneration : official publication of the Wound Healing Society [and] the European Tissue Repair Society
This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 2 clinical trial explored NorLeu(3)-A(1-7) (DSC127) safety and healing efficacy in diabetic foot ulcers. Patients with chronic, noninfected, neuropathic, or neuroischemic plantar Wagner Grade 1 or 2 foot ulcers (n = 172) were screened for nonhealing. Subjects were randomized to receive 4 weeks' once-daily topical treatment with 0.03% DSC127 (n = 26), 0.01% DSC127 (n = 27), or Placebo (n = 24), followed by 20 weeks' standard of care. DSC127 was assessed for safety (including laboratory values and adverse events), primary efficacy (% ulcers completely epithelialized at Week 12), and durability of effect. Baseline, demography, and safety parameters were compared between intent-to-treat groups and were comparable. Dose-response curves for DSC127 effect on % area reduction from baseline at Week 12 (40% placebo; 67% 0.01% DSC127; 80% 0.03% DSC127) and 24 (23% placebo; 53% 0.01% DSC127; 95% 0.03% DSC127) followed a log-linear pattern for both intent-to-treat and per-protocol populations. Covariate analysis compared reduction in ulcer area, depth, and volume from baseline; reductions in the 0.03% DSC127 group were greater at Weeks 12 and 24. Placebo-treated ulcers healed in a median 22 weeks vs. 8.5 weeks for 0.03%DSC127 (p = 0.04). This study provides preliminary evidence that DSC127 is safe and effective in accelerating the healing of diabetic foot ulcers.© 2012 by the Wound Healing Society.
Topical application of a gentamicin-collagen sponge combined with systemic antibiotic therapy for the treatment of diabetic foot infections of moderate severity: a randomized, controlled, multicenter clinical trial. - Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association
The aim of this pilot study was to determine the safety and potential benefit of adding a topical gentamicin-collagen sponge to standard of care (systemic antibiotic therapy plus standard diabetic wound management) for treating diabetic foot infections of moderate severity.We randomized 56 patients with moderately infected diabetic foot ulcers in a 2:1 ratio to receive standard of care plus the gentamicin-collagen sponge (treatment group, n = 38) or standard of care only (control group, n = 18) for up to 28 days of treatment. Investigators performed clinical, microbiological, and safety assessments at regularly scheduled intervals and collected pharmacokinetic samples from patients treated with the gentamicin-collagen sponge. Test of cure was clinically assessed 14 days after all antibiotic therapy was stopped.On treatment day 7, we noted clinical cure in no treatment patients and three control patients (P = .017). However, for evaluable patients at the test-of-cure visit, the treatment group had a significantly higher proportion of patients with clinical cure than did the control group (22 of 22 [100.0%] versus 7 of 10 [70.0%]; P =.024). Patients in the treatment group also had a higher rate of eradication of baseline pathogens at all visits (P ≤ .038) and a reduced time to pathogen eradication (P < .001). Safety data were similar for both groups.Topical application of the gentamicin-collagen sponge seems safe and may improve clinical and microbiological outcomes of diabetic foot infections of moderate severity when combined with standard of care. These pilot data suggest that a larger trial of this treatment is warranted.
Comparative effectiveness of mechanically and electrically powered negative pressure wound therapy devices: a multicenter randomized controlled trial. - Wound repair and regeneration : official publication of the Wound Healing Society [and] the European Tissue Repair Society
This study was designed to compare the ultraportable mechanically powered Smart Negative Pressure (SNaP) Wound Care System (Spiracur, Sunnyvale, CA) with the electrically powered Vacuum-Assisted Closure (VAC) Therapy System (Kinetic Concepts, Inc. [KCI], San Antonio, TX) in a multicenter, comparative efficacy, noninferiority-powered, randomized controlled trial. We enrolled 132 people with noninfected, nonischemic, nonplantar lower extremity diabetic and venous wounds. Each subject was randomly assigned (1:1) to treatment with either system in conjunction with appropriate off-loading and compression therapy. The trial evaluated treatment for up to 16 weeks or complete wound closure (defined as complete reepithelialization without drainage). Primary end point analysis of wound size reduction found that SNaP-treated subjects demonstrated noninferiority to the VAC-treated subjects at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks (p = 0.0030, 0.0130, 0.0051, and 0.0044, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed no significant difference in complete wound closure between SNaP- and VAC-treated subjects at all time points. Device related adverse events and complications such as infection were also similar between treatment groups. These data support similar wound healing outcomes between the SNaP system and the VAC system in the population studied.© 2012 by the Wound Healing Society.
Initial clinical assessment of a novel wound management system: a case series. - Advances in skin & wound care
The importance of exudate management for maintaining local moisture balance and avoiding maceration in the chronic wound environment is well established. The authors performed the initial clinical testing of a novel wound management system, Sepaderm (Aalnex, Inc, Irvine, California), designed to vertically wick and sequester excess exudate away from wound/periwound tissues to promote a healthy wound environment. In this series of 14 patients with lower-extremity chronic venous leg and diabetic foot ulcers, the 3-component system was well tolerated and demonstrated the ability to prevent exudate leakage onto periwound tissue and reduce existing pain and itching. All ulcers lasting 1.2 to 360 months were previously treated with standard therapies, including human cell-derived skin substitutes in some of the patients. After treatment with the new system for 7 to 174 days, 8 patients had various degrees of wound closure, ranging from 44% to 100%. The 6 patients who failed to show wound closure were treated with the new system for an average of 5.7 days, but demonstrated other clinical benefits. Future studies in larger patient populations with quantitative wound closure assessments, as well as measurements of exudate, periwound maceration, and pain management, are needed.
Comparison of negative pressure wound therapy with an ultraportable mechanically powered device vs. traditional electrically powered device for the treatment of chronic lower extremity ulcers: a multicenter randomized-controlled trial. - Wound repair and regeneration : official publication of the Wound Healing Society [and] the European Tissue Repair Society
The purpose of this study was to compare the ultraportable mechanically powered Smart Negative Pressure (SNaP(®)) Wound Care System to the traditional electrically powered Vacuum-Assisted Closure (VAC(®)) Therapy System in the treatment of chronic lower extremity wounds. This 12-center randomized-controlled trial of patients with noninfected, nonischemic, nonplantar lower extremity wounds had enrolled 65 patients, as of January 5, 2010, at the time of a planned interim analysis. Subjects were randomly assigned to treatment with either the SNaP(®) or VAC(®) Systems. The trial evaluated treatment for up to 16 weeks or till complete closure was achieved. Fifty-three patients (N=27 SNaP(®), N=26 VAC(®)) completed at least 4 weeks of therapy. Thirty-three patients (N=18 SNaP(®), N=15 VAC(®)) completed the study with either healing or 16 weeks of therapy. At the time of planned interim analysis, no significant differences (p=0.99) in the proportion of subjects healed between the two devices evaluated were found. In addition, the percent wound size reduction between treatment groups was not significantly different at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks, with noninferiority analysis at 4 weeks of treatment reaching the p-value <0.05 significance level (*p=0.019). These interim data suggest no difference in wound closure between the SNaP(®) System and the VAC(®) System in the population studied. We look forward to the final analysis results.© 2011 by the Wound Healing Society.
Clinical effectiveness of an acellular dermal regenerative tissue matrix compared to standard wound management in healing diabetic foot ulcers: a prospective, randomised, multicentre study. - International wound journal
This 12-week, prospective, randomised, controlled multi-centre study compared the proportion of healed diabetic foot ulcers and mean healing time between patients receiving acellular matrix (AM) (study group) and standard of care (control group) therapies. Eighty-six patients were randomised into study (47 patients) and control (39 patients) groups. No significant differences in demographics or pre-treatment ulcer data were calculated. Complete healing and mean healing time were 69.6% and 5.7 weeks, respectively, for the study group and 46.2% and 6.8 weeks, respectively, for the control group. The proportion of healed ulcers between the groups was statistically significant (P = 0.0289), with odds of healing in the study group 2.7 times higher than in the control group. Kaplan-Meier survivorship analysis for time to complete healing at 12 weeks showed a significantly higher non healing rate (P = 0.015) for the control group (53.9%) compared with the study group (30.4%). After adjusting for ulcer size at presentation, which was a statistically significant covariate (P = 0.0194), a statistically significant difference in non healing rate between groups was calculated (P = 0.0233), with odds of healing 2.0 times higher in the study versus control group. This study supports the use of single-application AM therapy as an effective treatment of diabetic, neuropathic ulcers.

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