Docality.com Logo
 
Dr. Nada  Harik  Md image

Dr. Nada Harik Md

800 Marshall St # 653
Little Rock AR 72202
501 641-1100
Medical School: Other - 1999
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: No
Participates In EHR: No
License #: E-3286
NPI: 1023192044
Taxonomy Codes:
2080P0208X

Request Appointment Information

Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Nada Harik is associated with these group practices

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

None Found

Publications

Clinical characteristics and epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in children with cystic fibrosis from a center with a high MRSA prevalence. - American journal of infection control
We describe the clinical characteristics and epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) from the U.S. CF center with the highest MRSA prevalence.Medical records of children with CF were retrospectively reviewed from 1997-2009. MRSA clinical isolates from 2007-2009 were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and pulsed field gel electrophoresis.The prevalence of MRSA was 1% in 1997 and 49% in 2009. Fifty-five children (26%) had persistent MRSA infection. Sixty-eight percent of MRSA isolates were hospital-associated (HA) MRSA, of which 52% were pulsed-field type USA 100. Ninety-three percent of HA MRSA isolates were clindamycin resistant. Twelve children acquired MRSA before 1 year of age, 83% of whom were hospitalized prior to acquisition of MRSA. Ten of 11 sibling pairs carried indistinguishable MRSA strains. Children with persistent MRSA were hospitalized more often (P = .01), required inhaled medications more frequently (P = .01), and had higher rates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa coinfection (P < .001).MRSA prevalence in children with CF is increasing, and most children are infected with HA MRSA. Exposure to health care facilities and gastrointestinal surgeries may facilitate early acquisition of MRSA. Siblings carry indistinguishable MRSA strains, indicating household transmission of MRSA. Children with persistent MRSA had worse pulmonary morbidity. Coinfection with MRSA and P aeruginosa is likely associated with further increased pulmonary morbidity.Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Comparative effectiveness of intravenous vs oral antibiotics for postdischarge treatment of acute osteomyelitis in children. - JAMA pediatrics
Postdischarge treatment of acute osteomyelitis in children requires weeks of antibiotic therapy, which can be administered orally or intravenously via a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). The catheters carry a risk for serious complications, but limited evidence exists on the effectiveness of oral therapy.To compare the effectiveness and adverse outcomes of postdischarge antibiotic therapy administered via the PICC or the oral route.We performed a retrospective cohort study comparing PICC and oral therapy for the treatment of acute osteomyelitis. Among children hospitalized from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2012, at 36 participating children's hospitals, we used discharge codes to identify potentially eligible participants. Results of medical record review confirmed eligibility and defined treatment group allocation and study outcomes. We used within- and across-hospital propensity score-based full matching to adjust for confounding by indication.Postdischarge administration of antibiotics via the PICC or the oral route.The primary outcome was treatment failure. Secondary outcomes included adverse drug reaction, PICC line complication, and a composite of all 3 end points.Among 2060 children and adolescents (hereinafter referred to as children) with osteomyelitis, 1005 received oral antibiotics at discharge, whereas 1055 received PICC-administered antibiotics. The proportion of children treated via the PICC route varied across hospitals from 0 to 100%. In the across-hospital (risk difference, 0.3% [95% CI, -0.1% to 2.5%]) and within-hospital (risk difference, 0.6% [95% CI, -0.2% to 3.0%]) matched analyses, children treated with antibiotics via the oral route (reference group) did not experience more treatment failures than those treated with antibiotics via the PICC route. Rates of adverse drug reaction were low (<4% in both groups) but slightly greater in the PICC group in across-hospital (risk difference, 1.7% [95% CI, 0.1%-3.3%]) and within-hospital (risk difference, 2.1% [95% CI, 0.3%-3.8%]) matched analyses. Among the children in the PICC group, 158 (15.0%) had a PICC complication that required an emergency department visit (n = 96), a rehospitalization (n = 38), or both (n = 24). As a result, the PICC group had a much higher risk of requiring a return visit to the emergency department or for hospitalization for any adverse outcome in across-hospital (risk difference, 14.6% [95% CI, 11.3%-17.9%]) and within-hospital (risk difference, 14.0% [95% CI, 10.5%-17.6%]) matched analyses.Given the magnitude and seriousness of PICC complications, clinicians should reconsider the practice of treating otherwise healthy children with acute osteomyelitis with prolonged intravenous antibiotics after hospital discharge when an equally effective oral alternative exists.
Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection among young children in a cardiac intensive care unit: a single institution experience. - Pediatric cardiology
Stenotrophomonas maltophilia can present as bacteremia, respiratory tract infection, urinary tract infection, soft tissue and wound infections, bone and joint infections, meningitis, and endocarditis especially in immunosuppressed patients and those with underlying medical conditions. The incidence and impact of S. maltophilia in young children with heart disease are poorly defined. A single center retrospective observational study was conducted in infants <180 days of age with positive S. maltophilia cultures over a period of 5 years. The overall incidence for S. maltophilia infection was 0.8 % (n = 32/3656). Among 32 identified infants, there were 47 episodes of S. maltophilia infection 66 % of infants had prior exposure to broad spectrum antibiotics. 97 % of positive isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and 91 % to levofloxacin as well as ticarcillin/clavulanate. Ventilator-free days and absolute lymphocyte count prior to acquiring infection were significantly lower in non-survivors than in survivors. 100 % of survivors had clearance of positive cultures compared to 50 % in non-survivors (p < 0.05). The crude all-cause mortality rate was 37.5 %. All non-survivors had increased length of ICU stay and duration of mechanical ventilation and had delayed clearance of infection and required longer duration of treatment.
Impact of individual extracellular proteases on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation in diverse clinical isolates and their isogenic sarA mutants. - MicrobiologyOpen
We demonstrate that the purified Staphylococcus aureus extracellular proteases aureolysin, ScpA, SspA, and SspB limit biofilm formation, with aureolysin having the greatest impact. Using protease-deficient derivatives of LAC, we confirmed that this is due to the individual proteases themselves. Purified aureolysin, and to a lesser extent ScpA and SspB, also promoted dispersal of an established biofilm. Mutation of the genes encoding these proteases also only partially restored biofilm formation in an FPR3757 sarA mutant and had little impact on restoring virulence in a murine bacteremia model. In contrast, eliminating the production of all of these proteases fully restored both biofilm formation and virulence in a sarA mutant generated in the closely related USA300 strain LAC. These results confirm an important role for multiple extracellular proteases in S. aureus pathogenesis and the importance of sarA in repressing their production. Moreover, purified aureolysin limited biofilm formation in 14 of 15 methicillin-resistant isolates and 11 of 15 methicillin-susceptible isolates, while dispersin B had little impact in UAMS-1, LAC, or 29 of 30 contemporary isolates of S. aureus. This suggests that the role of sarA and its impact on protease production is important in diverse strains of S. aureus irrespective of their methicillin resistance status.© 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Histoplasmosis associated with a bamboo bonfire--Arkansas, October 2011. - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
On October 27, 2011, the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) was notified by a northeast Arkansas primary care provider of a cluster of three histoplasmosis cases. On November 4, ADH was notified by a pediatric infectious diseases specialist regarding seven potential cases of pulmonary histoplasmosis associated with a family gathering that included a bonfire that burned bamboo from a grove that had been a red-winged blackbird roost. These reports prompted an outbreak investigation to ensure that the persons involved received appropriate medical care, to identify whether any novel exposures were associated with illness, and to determine whether any factors were associated with hospitalization. The investigation found that, among the 19 attendees at the family gathering, seven were confirmed with histoplasmosis, 11 were probable, and one did not have histoplasmosis.
Addressing antimicrobial resistance to treat children with atopic dermatitis in a tertiary pediatric allergy clinic. - Clinical pediatrics
Secondary skin infection with Staphylococcus aureus is a significant problem in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients.This study evaluated antimicrobial resistance patterns of S aureus isolates from skin lesions in AD patients and empiric antimicrobial prescribing patterns.Resistance patterns from positive skin cultures obtained from AD patients in the Allergy/Immunology clinic from May 1, 2006, to December 31, 2008, were compared with all outpatient wound cultures over the same period.Fifty-nine cultures were obtained from 38 AD patients. S aureus was the most common pathogen cultured from AD patients (53/59 cultures). S aureus resistance to clindamycin and methicillin differed significantly between the study group and the outpatient reference population (37.7% vs 9.4% and 45.3% vs 76.4%). Clindamycin was the most commonly prescribed antimicrobial (59%). Overall, 31.4% of organisms showed resistance to the antimicrobial prescribed.Susceptibility profiles of S aureus isolates from AD patients vary significantly from that of the general population.
Management of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children. - Expert review of anti-infective therapy
In children, osteomyelitis is primarily hematogenous in origin and acute in nature. The principal cause of osteomyelitis in children is Staphylococcus aureus, and both the epidemiology and pathogenesis of S. aureus infections, including osteomyelitis, have changed in recent years owing to the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus. This review focuses on advances in the diagnosis and overall management of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children with these changes in mind.
igr Genes and Mycobacterium tuberculosis cholesterol metabolism. - Journal of bacteriology
Recently, cholesterol was identified as a physiologically important nutrient for Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival in chronically infected mice. However, it remained unclear precisely when cholesterol is available to the bacterium and what additional bacterial functions are required for its metabolism. Here, we show that the igr locus, which we previously found to be essential for intracellular growth and virulence of M. tuberculosis, is required for cholesterol metabolism. While igr-deficient strains grow identically to the wild type in the presence of short- and long-chain fatty acids, the growth of these bacteria is completely inhibited in the presence of cholesterol. Interestingly, this mutant is still able to respire under cholesterol-dependent growth inhibition, suggesting that the bacteria can metabolize other carbon sources during cholesterol toxicity. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that the growth-inhibitory effect of cholesterol in vitro depends on cholesterol import, as mutation of the mce4 sterol uptake system partially suppresses this effect. In addition, the Delta igr mutant growth defect during the early phase of disease is completely suppressed by mutating mce4, implicating cholesterol intoxication as the primary mechanism of attenuation. We conclude that M. tuberculosis metabolizes cholesterol throughout infection.
A replication clock for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. - Nature medicine
Few tools exist to assess replication of chronic pathogens during infection. This has been a considerable barrier to understanding latent tuberculosis, and efforts to develop new therapies generally assume that the bacteria are very slowly replicating or nonreplicating during latency. To monitor Mycobacterium tuberculosis replication within hosts, we exploit an unstable plasmid that is lost at a steady, quantifiable rate from dividing cells in the absence of antibiotic selection. By applying a mathematical model, we calculate bacterial growth and death rates during infection of mice. We show that during chronic infection, the cumulative bacterial burden-enumerating total live, dead and removed organisms encountered by the mouse lung-is substantially higher than estimates from colony-forming units. Our data show that M. tuberculosis replicates throughout the course of chronic infection of mice and is restrained by the host immune system. This approach may also shed light on the replication dynamics of other chronic pathogens.
Cesium-induced QT-interval prolongation in an adolescent. - Pharmacotherapy
Alternative medicine is becoming increasingly popular, especially with terminally ill patients. Most alternative remedies have not been adequately studied or proven effective for the diseases for which they are promoted. In the worst cases, these therapies are harmful. We describe a 16-year-old girl with metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma who experienced cesium-induced QT-interval prolongation after the start of a cesium chloride-based alternative treatment regimen. She had received seven courses of chemotherapy, with a cumulative doxorubicin dose of 500 mg/m(2) over 5 months, resulting in minimal tumor regression. Against the advice of her oncologist, she abandoned traditional therapy and started an alternative regimen that included cesium chloride supplements. Two weeks later, the patient went to a local emergency department after experiencing two brief syncopal episodes. An electrocardiogram revealed occasional premature ventricular contractions, a QTc interval of 683 msec (normal range for females 450-460 msec), and R on T phenomenon. She was admitted to the hospital and later experienced monomorphic ventricular tachycardia, which resolved spontaneously. Lidocaine therapy was started, and the patient was transferred to a cardiac intensive care unit at our hospital. Her plasma cesium level was 2400 microg/dl (normal < 1 microg/dl), and her family was told to stop her alternative treatment regimen. On hospital day 5, as no additional arrhythmias had occurred, lidocaine was discontinued. Two days later, the patient's QTc interval had decreased to 546 msec, and she was discharged home. Two months later, at a follow-up visit, her serum cesium level was 1800 microg/dl, and her QTc interval was 494 msec. According to the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale, cesium was the probable cause of the patient's arrhythmia. In animal models, cesium chloride has induced cardiac arrhythmias, including torsade de pointes. It inhibits delayed rectifier potassium channels in the myocardium, causing delayed repolarization and QT-interval prolongation. Patients with cancer should be aware that alternative remedies may be harmful and ineffective. Because patients may be unlikely to self-report alternative remedies, health care providers should specifically ask their patients about any alternative treatments they may be taking and should be knowledgeable about their toxicities.

Map & Directions

800 Marshall St # 653 Little Rock, AR 72202
View Directions In Google Maps

Nearby Doctors

1 Childrens Way # 854
Little Rock, AR 72202
501 641-1100
1 Childrens Way # 653
Little Rock, AR 72202
501 641-1100
800 Marshall St # 653
Little Rock, AR 72202
501 641-1100
800 Marshall St # 653
Little Rock, AR 72202
501 641-1100
800 Marshall St
Little Rock, AR 72202
501 641-1874
1 Childrens Way Slot107
Little Rock, AR 72202
501 641-1100
800 Marshall St # 653
Little Rock, AR 72202
501 641-1100
800 Marshall St # 653
Little Rock, AR 72202
501 641-1100
1 Childrens Way Slot 512-12
Little Rock, AR 72202
501 641-1846
800 Marshall St # 653
Little Rock, AR 72202
501 641-1100