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Dr. Aviva  Abosch  Md image

Dr. Aviva Abosch Md

12605 E 16Th Ave
Aurora CO 80045
720 480-0000
Medical School: University Of Pittsburgh School Of Medicine - 1993
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: Yes
License #:
NPI: 1023062999
Taxonomy Codes:
207T00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Aviva Abosch is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:61867 Description:Implant neuroelectrode Average Price:$9,987.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$2,100.99
HCPCS Code:61885 Description:Insrt/redo neurostim 1 array Average Price:$2,788.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$531.85
HCPCS Code:95978 Description:Analyze neurostim brain/1h Average Price:$979.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$175.48
HCPCS Code:99205 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$487.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$156.65
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$322.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$104.16
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$228.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$74.06
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$148.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$48.16

HCPCS Code Definitions

61885
Insertion or replacement of cranial neurostimulator pulse generator or receiver, direct or inductive coupling; with connection to a single electrode array
95978
Electronic analysis of implanted neurostimulator pulse generator system (eg, rate, pulse amplitude and duration, battery status, electrode selectability and polarity, impedance and patient compliance measurements), complex deep brain neurostimulator pulse generator/transmitter, with initial or subsequent programming; first hour
99205
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 60 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
61867
Twist drill, burr hole, craniotomy, or craniectomy with stereotactic implantation of neurostimulator electrode array in subcortical site (eg, thalamus, globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus, periventricular, periaqueductal gray), with use of intraoperative microelectrode recording; first array

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1770686578
Neurology
123
1154406783
Diagnostic Radiology
36
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Abosch has made to other doctors

Publications

Attrition rates in neurosurgery residency: analysis of 1361 consecutive residents matched from 1990 to 1999. - Journal of neurosurgery
The objective of this study is to determine neurosurgery residency attrition rates by sex of matched applicant and by type and rank of medical school attended.The study follows a cohort of 1361 individuals who matched into a neurosurgery residency program through the SF Match Fellowship and Residency Matching Service from 1990 to 1999. The main outcome measure was achievement of board certification as documented in the American Board of Neurological Surgery Directory of Diplomats. A secondary outcome measure was documentation of practicing medicine as verified by the American Medical Association DoctorFinder and National Provider Identifier websites. Overall, 10.7% (n=146) of these individuals were women. Twenty percent (n=266) graduated from a top 10 medical school (24% of women [35/146] and 19% of men [232/1215], p=0.19). Forty-five percent (n=618) were graduates of a public medical school, 50% (n=680) of a private medical school, and 5% (n=63) of an international medical school. At the end of the study, 0.2% of subjects (n=3) were deceased and 0.3% (n=4) were lost to follow-up.The total residency completion rate was 86.0% (n=1171) overall, with 76.0% (n=111/146) of women and 87.2% (n=1059/1215) of men completing residency. Board certification was obtained by 79.4% (n=1081) of all individuals matching into residency between 1990 and 1999. Overall, 63.0% (92/146) of women and 81.3% (989/1215) of men were board certified. Women were found to be significantly more at risk (p<0.005) of not completing residency or becoming board certified than men. Public medical school alumni had significantly higher board certification rates than private and international alumni (82.2% for public [508/618]; 77.1% for private [524/680]; 77.8% for international [49/63]; p<0.05). There was no significant difference in attrition for graduates of top 10-ranked institutions versus other institutions. There was no difference in number of years to achieve neurosurgical board certification for men versus women.Overall, neurosurgery training attrition rates are low. Women have had greater attrition than men during and after neurosurgery residency training. International and private medical school alumni had higher attrition than public medical school alumni.
Clinical implications of local field potentials for understanding and treating movement disorders. - Stereotactic and functional neurosurgery
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of movement disorders has provided researchers with an opportunity to record electrical oscillatory activity from electrodes implanted in deep brain structures. Extracellular activity recorded from a population of neurons, termed local field potentials (LFPs), has shed light on the pathophysiology of movement disorders and holds the potential to lead to refinement in existing treatments.This paper reviews the clinical significance of LFPs recorded from macroelectrodes implanted in basal ganglia and thalamic targets for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, essential tremor and dystonia.Neural population dynamics and subthreshold events, which are undetectable by single-unit recordings, can be examined with frequency band analysis of LFPs (frequency range: 1-250 Hz).Of clinical relevance, reliable correlations between motor symptoms and components of the LFP power spectrum suggest that LFPs may serve as a biomarker for movement disorders. In particular, Parkinson's rigidity has been shown to correlate with the power of beta oscillations (13-30 Hz), and essential tremor coheres with oscillations of 8-27 Hz. Furthermore, evidence indicates that the optimal contacts for DBS programming can be predicted from the anatomic location of beta and gamma bands (48-200 Hz).LFP analysis has implications for improved electrode targeting and the development of a real-time, individualized, 'closed-loop' stimulation system.2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder: systematic review and evidence-based guideline sponsored by the American Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) and endorsed by the CNS - Neurosurgery
It is estimated that 40% to 60% of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) continue to experience symptoms despite adequate medical management. For this population of treatment-refractory patients, promising results have been reported with the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS).To conduct a systematic review of the literature and develop evidence-based guidelines on DBS for OCD.A systematic literature search was undertaken using the PubMed database for articles published between 1966 and October 2012 combining the following words: "deep brain stimulation and obsessive-compulsive disorder" or "electrical stimulation and obsessive-compulsive disorder." Of 353 articles, 7 were retrieved for full-text review and analysis. The quality of the articles was assigned to each study and the strength of recommendation graded according to the guidelines development methodology of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons Joint Guidelines Committee.Of the 7 studies, 1 class I and 2 class II double-blind, randomized, controlled trials reported that bilateral DBS is more effective in improving OCD symptoms than sham treatment.Based on the data published in the literature, the following recommendations can be made: (1) There is Level I evidence, based on a single class I study, for the use of bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS for the treatment of medically refractory OCD. (2) There is Level II evidence, based on a single class II study, for the use of bilateral nucleus accumbens DBS for the treatment of medically refractory OCD. (3) There is insufficient evidence to make a recommendation for the use of unilateral DBS for the treatment of medically refractory OCD.
Anatomic correlates of deep brain stimulation electrode impedance. - Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry
The location of the optimal target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) remains controversial. Electrode impedance affects tissue activation by DBS and has been found to vary by contact number, but no studies have examined association between impedance and anatomic location.To evaluate the relationship between electrode impedance and anatomic contact location, and to assess the clinical significance of impedance.We gathered retrospective impedance data from 101 electrodes in 73 patients with Parkinson's disease. We determined contact location using microelectrode recording (MER) and high-field 7T MRI, and assessed the relationship between impedance and contact location.For contact location as assessed via MER, impedance was significantly higher for contacts in STN, at baseline (111 Ω vs STN border, p=0.03; 169 Ω vs white matter, p<0.001) and over time (90 Ω vs STN border, p<0.001; 54 Ω vs white matter, p<0.001). Over time, impedance was lowest in contacts situated at STN border (p=0.03). Impedance did not vary by contact location as assessed via imaging. Location determination was 75% consistent between MER and imaging. Impedance was inversely related to absolute symptom reduction during stimulation (-2.5 motor portion of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (mUPDRS) points per 1000 Ω, p=0.01).In the vicinity of DBS electrodes chronically implanted in STN, impedance is lower at the rostral STN border and in white matter, than in STN. This finding suggests that current reaches white matter fibres more readily than neuronal cell bodies in STN, which may help explain anatomic variation in stimulation efficacy.Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
Variation in deep brain stimulation electrode impedance over years following electrode implantation. - Stereotactic and functional neurosurgery
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode impedance is a major determinant of current delivery to target tissues, but long-term variation in impedance has received little attention.To assess the relationship between electrode impedance and time in a large DBS patient population and characterize the relationship between contact activity and impedance.We collected retrospective impedance and programming data from 128 electrodes in 84 patients with Parkinson's disease, essential tremor or dystonia. Effects of time, contact activity, stimulation voltage and other parameters on impedance were assessed. We also examined impedance changes following contact activation and deactivation.Impedance decreased by 73 Ω/year (p < 0.001), with 72% of contacts following a downward trend. Impedance was on average 163 Ω lower in active contacts (p < 0.001). Contact activation and inactivation were associated with a more (p < 0.001) and less (p = 0.016) rapid decline in impedance, respectively. Higher stimulation voltages were associated with lower impedance values (p < 0.001). Contact number and electrode model were also significant predictors of impedance.Impedance decreases gradually in a stimulation-dependent manner. These trends have implications for long-term programming, the development of a closed-loop DBS device and current understanding of the electrode-tissue interface.© 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation improves somatosensory function in Parkinson's disease. - Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society
An established treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) is deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Mounting evidence suggests that PD is also associated with somatosensory deficits, yet the effect of STN-DBS on somatosensory processing is largely unknown. This study investigated whether STN-DBS affects somatosensory processing, specifically the processing of tactile and proprioceptive cues, by systematically examining the accuracy of haptic perception of object size. (Haptic perception refers to one's ability to extract object features such as shape and size by active touch.) Without vision, 13 PD patients with implanted STN-DBS and 13 healthy controls haptically explored the heights of 2 successively presented 3-dimensional (3D) blocks using a precision grip. Participants verbally indicated which block was taller and then used their nonprobing hand to motorically match the perceived size of the comparison block. Patients were tested during ON and OFF stimulation, following a 12-hour medication washout period. First, when compared to controls, the PD group's haptic discrimination threshold during OFF stimulation was elevated by 192% and mean hand aperture error was increased by 105%. Second, DBS lowered the haptic discrimination threshold by 26% and aperture error decreased by 20%. Third, during DBS ON, probing with the motorically more affected hand decreased haptic precision compared to probing with the less affected hand. This study offers the first evidence that STN-DBS improves haptic precision, further indicating that somatosensory function is improved by STN-DBS. We conclude that DBS-related improvements are not explained by improvements in motor function alone, but rather by enhanced somatosensory processing.© 2013 Movement Disorder Society.
An international survey of deep brain stimulation procedural steps. - Stereotactic and functional neurosurgery
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery is standard of care for the treatment of certain movement disorders.We sought to characterize the spectrum of steps performed in DBS surgery, at centers around the world where this surgery is performed.We identified the main steps in DBS surgery workflow and grouped these 19 steps into 3 phases (preoperative, operative, and postoperative). A survey tool, informed by a pilot survey, was administered internationally by trained study personnel at high- and low-volume DBS centers. Procedural components, duration, and surgeon motivational factors were assessed. Cluster analysis was used to identify procedural and behavioral clusters.One hundred eighty-five procedure workflow surveys (143 DBS centers) and 65 online surveys of surgeon motivational drivers were completed (45% response rate). Significant heterogeneity in technique, operative time, and surgeon motivational drivers was reported across centers.We provide a description of the procedural steps involved in DBS surgery and the duration of these steps, based on an international survey. These data will enable individual surgeons and centers to examine their own experience relative to colleagues at other centers and in other countries. Such information could also be useful in comparing efficiencies and identifying workflow obstacles between different hospital environments.Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Heating induced near deep brain stimulation lead electrodes during magnetic resonance imaging with a 3 T transceive volume head coil. - Physics in medicine and biology
Heating induced near deep brain stimulation (DBS) lead electrodes during magnetic resonance imaging with a 3 T transceive head coil was measured, modeled, and imaged in three cadaveric porcine heads (mean body weight = 85.47 ± 3.19 kg, mean head weight = 5.78 ± 0.32 kg). The effect of the placement of the extra-cranial portion of the DBS lead on the heating was investigated by looping the extra-cranial lead on the top, side, and back of the head, and placing it parallel to the coil's longitudinal axial direction. The heating was induced using a 641 s long turbo spin echo sequence with the mean whole head average specific absorption rate of 3.16 W kg(-1). Temperatures were measured using fluoroptic probes at the scalp, first and second electrodes from the distal lead tip, and 6 mm distal from electrode 1 (T(6 mm)). The heating was modeled using the maximum T(6 mm) and imaged using a proton resonance frequency shift-based MR thermometry method. Results showed that the heating was significantly reduced when the extra-cranial lead was placed in the longitudinal direction compared to the other placements (peak temperature change = 1.5-3.2 °C versus 5.1-24.7 °C). Thermal modeling and MR thermometry may be used together to determine the heating and improve patient safety online.
Long-term recordings of local field potentials from implanted deep brain stimulation electrodes. - Neurosurgery
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus is an effective treatment for Parkinson disease. However, DBS is not responsive to an individual's disease state, and programming parameters, once established, do not change to reflect disease state. Local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from DBS electrodes are being investigated as potential biomarkers for the Parkinson disease state. However, no patient data exist about what happens to LFPs over the lifetime of the implant.We investigated whether LFP amplitude and response to limb movement differed between patients implanted acutely with subthalamic nucleus DBS electrodes and patients implanted 2 to 7 years previously.We recorded LFPs at DBS surgery time (9 subjects), 3 weeks after initial placement (9 subjects), and 2 to 7 years (median: 3.5) later during implanted programmable generator replacement (11 sides). LFP power-frequency spectra for each of 3 bipolar electrode derivations of adjacent contacts were calculated over 5-minute resting and 30-second movement epochs. Monopolar impedance data were used to evaluate trends over time.There was no significant difference in β-band LFP amplitude between initial electrode implantation (OR) and 3-week post-OR times (P=.94). However, β-band amplitude was lower at implanted programmable generator replacement times than in OR (P=.008) and post-OR recordings (P=.039). Impedance measurements declined over time (P<.001).Postoperative LFP activity can be recorded years after DBS implantation and demonstrates a similar profile in response to movement as during acute recordings, although amplitude may decrease. These results support the feasibility of constructing a closed-loop, patient-responsive DBS device based on LFP activity.
Improved spatial targeting with directionally segmented deep brain stimulation leads for treating essential tremor. - Journal of neural engineering
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the ventral intermediate nucleus of thalamus (Vim) is known to exert a therapeutic effect on postural and kinetic tremor in patients with essential tremor (ET). For DBS leads implanted near the caudal border of Vim, however, there is an increased likelihood that one will also induce paresthesia side-effects by stimulating neurons within the sensory pathway of the ventral caudal (Vc) nucleus of thalamus. The aim of this computational study was to (1) investigate the neuronal pathways modulated by therapeutic, sub-therapeutic and paresthesia-inducing DBS settings in three patients with ET and (2) determine how much better an outcome could have been achieved had these patients been implanted with a DBS lead containing directionally segmented electrodes (dDBS). Multi-compartment neuron models of the thalamocortical, cerebellothalamic and medial lemniscal pathways were first simulated in the context of patient-specific anatomies, lead placements and programming parameters from three ET patients who had been implanted with Medtronic 3389 DBS leads. The models showed that in these patients, complete suppression of tremor was associated most closely with activating an average of 62% of the cerebellothalamic afferent input into Vim (n = 10), while persistent paresthesias were associated with activating 35% of the medial lemniscal tract input into Vc thalamus (n = 12). The dDBS lead design demonstrated superior targeting of the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathway, especially in cases of misaligned DBS leads. Given the close proximity of Vim to Vc thalamus, the models suggest that dDBS will enable clinicians to more effectively sculpt current through and around thalamus in order to achieve a more consistent therapeutic effect without inducing side-effects.

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12605 E 16Th Ave Aurora, CO 80045
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Nearby Doctors

12605 E 16Th Ave
Aurora, CO 80045
720 480-0000
12605 E 16Th Ave
Aurora, CO 80045
720 480-0000
12605 E 16Th Ave
Aurora, CO 80045
720 480-0000
13123 E 16Th Ave
Aurora, CO 80045
720 771-1234
12605 E 16Th Ave
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720 480-0000
13123 E 16Th Ave
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12605 E 16Th Ave
Aurora, CO 80045
720 480-0000
12605 E 16Th Ave
Aurora, CO 80045
720 480-0000
13123 E 16Th Ave
Aurora, CO 80045
720 771-1234