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Dr. Takushi  Kohmoto  Md Phd image

Dr. Takushi Kohmoto Md Phd

600 Highland Ave
Madison WI 53792
608 631-1530
Medical School: Other - 1989
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 42
NPI: 1013971688
Taxonomy Codes:
204F00000X 208G00000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Takushi Kohmoto is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:33405 Description:Replacement of aortic valve Average Price:$19,150.39 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1,879.96
HCPCS Code:33533 Description:Cabg arterial single Average Price:$17,124.81 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1,403.63
HCPCS Code:33464 Description:Valvuloplasty tricuspid Average Price:$17,001.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$1,850.61
HCPCS Code:33518 Description:Cabg artery-vein two Average Price:$2,675.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$371.35
HCPCS Code:33508 Description:Endoscopic vein harvest Average Price:$764.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$15.45
HCPCS Code:99205 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$428.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$154.08
HCPCS Code:99222 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$383.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$128.22
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$316.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$98.12
HCPCS Code:99221 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$285.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$94.52
HCPCS Code:99203 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$225.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$71.85

HCPCS Code Definitions

33405
Replacement, aortic valve, with cardiopulmonary bypass; with prosthetic valve other than homograft or stentless valve
33464
Valvuloplasty, tricuspid valve; with ring insertion
33508
Endoscopy, surgical, including video-assisted harvest of vein(s) for coronary artery bypass procedure (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
33518
Coronary artery bypass, using venous graft(s) and arterial graft(s); 2 venous grafts (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
33533
Coronary artery bypass, using arterial graft(s); single arterial graft
99203
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99205
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 60 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99221
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed or comprehensive history; A detailed or comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of low severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99222
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1639186463
Diagnostic Radiology
1,243
1366497406
Diagnostic Radiology
695
1457328940
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
436
1548236581
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
407
1558322461
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
326
1477507242
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
228
1679540207
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
196
1629044706
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
193
1164487591
Cardiac Electrophysiology
180
1619938081
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
156
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Kohmoto has made to other doctors

Publications

Impact of age on outcomes following continuous-flow left ventricular assist device implantation. - Interactive cardiovascular and thoracic surgery
The goal of our study was to analyse the impact of age on outcomes in patients who underwent continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) placement at our institution.One hundred and twenty-eight patients were implanted with a CF-LVAD between January 2008 and June 2014. Eighty-five patients were implanted with the device as a bridge to transplant (BTT); the remaining (n = 43) were on destination therapy (DT). Each group was divided into patients <65 years old and ≥65 years old at device implantation. Patients were followed up for at least 24 months or until transplant or death.Eighty-five patients (66%) received a CF-LVAD as BTT. Patients ≥65 years old (n = 8) had a lower preoperative cardiac index and prothrombin time-international normalized ratio (P = 0.009), and a longer stay in the intensive care unit (P = 0.008). Adverse events including infections, re-exploration for bleeding, ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke, renal failure and right heart failure were comparable in both age groups. Eighty-two percent (n = 63) of the young patients and 75% (n = 6) of the older patients, who were on LVAD as BTT, underwent heart transplant within the first 24 months of LVAD implantation. Overall survival at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months were 95, 95, 77 and 70%, respectively, post-CF-LVAD implantation as BTT for the younger group and 73% for the older group at 3, 6 and 12 months (P = 0.35). Forty-three patients (34%) received a CF-LVAD as DT. Patients ≥65 years old (n = 14) on DT had a higher incidence of peripheral vascular disease (P = 0.048), higher serum sodium (P = 0.004) and serum creatinine values (P = 0.002), preoperatively. There were more strokes in the older patients post-LAVD implantation (14 vs 0%; P = 0.048). Overall survival at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months were 85, 79, 75 and 62%, respectively, for the younger group and 93, 77, 67 and 34% for the older group, respectively (P = 0.26).This study demonstrates that LVAD therapy can be used in the older patients with acceptable mortality and morbidity, and age alone should not be used as the sole criterion for exclusion from LVAD implantation.© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
Functional evaluation of human donation after cardiac death donor hearts using a continuous isolated myocardial perfusion technique: Potential for expansion of the cardiac donor population. - The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery
To investigate the resuscitation potential and contractile function in adult human donation after cardiac death (DCD) hearts by ex vivo perfusion.With institutional review board approval and under the DCD protocol at the University of Wisconsin (UW) Organ Procurement Organization, 5 brain dead (BD) and 5 DCD donor hearts were evaluated. All BD hearts were declined for clinical transplantation because of coronary artery disease, advanced age, or social history. All hearts were preserved by flushing and cold storage with UW solution. By using our ex vivo perfusion system, the left ventricular end systolic pressure-volume relationship (LV-ESPVR) was assessed for 2 hours of oxygenated blood reperfusion.All BD (n = 5) and 4 DCD hearts were successfully resuscitated. One DCD heart was unable to be resuscitated due to prolonged warm ischemic time (WIT; 174 minutes). Mean WIT for resuscitated DCD hearts (from extubation to flushing with cold UW solution) was 34 ± 3 minutes (range, 26 to 40 minutes); mean cold ischemic time for BD donors was 211 ± 31 minutes compared with 177 ± 64 minutes for DCD donors. The calculated LV-ESPVRs for BD hearts after 1 and 2 hours of reperfusion were 6.9 ± 0.7 and 5.7 ± 1.0 mm Hg/mL, respectively; LV-ESPVRs for DCD hearts after 1 and 2 hours of reperfusion were 5.6 ± 1.5 (P = .45) and 3.0 ± 0.7 mm Hg/mL (P = .07), respectively.We successfully resuscitated and measured ex vivo cardiac function in human DCD and BD donor hearts. Resuscitation potential in DCD hearts was achieved when the WIT was less than 40 minutes. Contractile performance in DCD hearts tended to be lower compared with BD hearts. Further investigation with longer reperfusion periods seems warranted.Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
Acuity adaptable patient care unit system shortens length of stay and improves outcomes in adult cardiac surgery: University of Wisconsin experience. - European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery : official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery
The Acuity Adaptable Patient Care (AAC) unit system allows all beds within a nursing unit to negate the need for transfer with changes in patient status. The unit is specialty specific to all levels of patient care. This system was implemented in March 2006 for cardiothoracic surgery at our institution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the AAC system on the outcomes after adult cardiac surgery.We retrospectively reviewed 2930 consecutive patients who underwent major adult cardiac procedures between January 2003 and December 2010. The cohorts were divided into the pre-AAC group (January 2003 to February 2006, n = 1029) and the AAC group (March 2006 to December 2010, n = 1901). Patient demographics and postoperative outcomes were assessed.The proportion of coronary artery bypass grafting was significantly lower (pre-AAC vs AAC: 43 vs 35%, P < 0.01), while those of aortic procedure (4 vs 11%, P < 0.01) and mechanical assist device insertion (3 vs 5%, P = 0.02) were higher in the AAC group. After the implementation of the AAC system, the incidence of all complications defined by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) database (49 vs 34%, P < 0.01), the median length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay (49 [interquartile range (IQR), 27-99] vs 26 [19-45] h, P < 0.01), that of hospital stay (6 [4-10] vs 5 [4-7] days, P < 0.01) and the readmission rate of ICU (5 vs 2% P < 0.01) were significantly decreased. Significant reductions in hospital mortality and the rate of hospital readmission <30 days were not observed.The implementation of the AAC system has improved the outcomes after major cardiac procedures. The incidence of postoperative complications and length of stay have all decreased significantly without increasing readmission rate. AAC creates a system of fluid care with specialty-trained nursing and other ancillary support that expedites discharge and improves overall patient outcomes.© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.
Effects of the HeartMate II left ventricular assist device as observed by serial echocardiography. - Echocardiography (Mount Kisco, N.Y.)
The HeartMate II is the most frequently used left ventricular assist device (LVAD) in patients with end-stage heart failure. There is a paucity of data regarding its longitudinal cardiac effects, particularly that on diastole.This retrospective study was an evaluation of echocardiograms preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively in patients with a HeartMate II. Measurements included left ventricle (LV) dimensions, ejection fraction (EF), right ventricle (RV) size and function, parameters of diastolic function, and an analysis of mitral regurgitation (MR), tricuspid regurgitation (TR), aortic insufficiency (AI), and aortic valve thickening.Forty-seven patients were evaluated. LV dimensions decreased but EF, RV size, and RV function were unchanged. Right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) and diastolic parameters including mitral inflow E/A, deceleration time (DT), pulmonary vein inflow, left atrial size, and overall diastolic grade improved. LV relaxation measured by tissue Doppler (e') was unchanged and the E/e' ratio was also unchanged. Regarding valve function, MR decreased, TR was unchanged, and the aortic valve became increasingly thickened with increased AI severity.The HeartMate II unloads the LV as shown by decreased LV size, decreased MR, reduced RVSP, and improved patterns of mitral inflow. However, neither systolic function nor diastolic relaxation improves in this cohort. RV size and function also remain unchanged. The aortic valve shows increased thickening and AI likely from valve leaflet fusion. These results provide detailed functional and hemodynamic information regarding the longitudinal effects of the HeartMate II.© 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Mitochondrial DNA deletion mutations in adult mouse cardiac side population cells. - Mutation research
We investigated the presence and potential role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion mutations in adult cardiac stem cells. Cardiac side population (SP) cells were isolated from 12-week-old mice. Standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to screen for the presence of mtDNA deletion mutations in (a) freshly isolated SP cells and (b) SP cells cultured to passage 10. When present, the abundance of mtDNA deletion mutation was analyzed in single cell colonies. The effect of different levels of deletion mutations on SP cell growth and differentiation was determined. MtDNA deletion mutations were found in both freshly isolated and cultured cells from 12-week-old mice. While there was no significant difference in the number of single cell colonies with mtDNA deletion mutations from any of the groups mentioned above, the abundance of mtDNA deletion mutations was significantly higher in the cultured cells, as determined by quantitative PCR. Within a single clonal cell population, the detectable mtDNA deletion mutations were the same in all cells and unique when compared to deletions of other colonies. We also found that cells harboring high levels of mtDNA deletion mutations (i.e. where deleted mtDNA comprised more than 60% of total mtDNA) had slower proliferation rates and decreased differentiation capacities. Screening cultured adult stem cells for mtDNA deletion mutations as a routine assessment will benefit the biomedical application of adult stem cells.Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Top-down quantitative proteomics identified phosphorylation of cardiac troponin I as a candidate biomarker for chronic heart failure. - Journal of proteome research
The rapid increase in the prevalence of chronic heart failure (CHF) worldwide underscores an urgent need to identify biomarkers for the early detection of CHF. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are associated with many critical signaling events during disease progression and thus offer a plethora of candidate biomarkers. We have employed a top-down quantitative proteomics methodology for comprehensive assessment of PTMs in whole proteins extracted from normal and diseased tissues. We systematically analyzed 36 clinical human heart tissue samples and identified phosphorylation of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) as a candidate biomarker for CHF. The relative percentages of the total phosphorylated cTnI forms over the entire cTnI populations (%P(total)) were 56.4 ± 3.5%, 36.9 ± 1.6%, 6.1 ± 2.4%, and 1.0 ± 0.6% for postmortem hearts with normal cardiac function (n = 7), early stage of mild hypertrophy (n = 5), severe hypertrophy/dilation (n = 4), and end-stage CHF (n = 6), respectively. In fresh transplant samples, the %P(total) of cTnI from nonfailing donor (n = 4), and end-stage failing hearts (n = 10) were 49.5 ± 5.9% and 18.8 ± 2.9%, respectively. Top-down MS with electron capture dissociation unequivocally localized the altered phosphorylation sites to Ser22/23 and determined the order of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. This study represents the first clinical application of top-down MS-based quantitative proteomics for biomarker discovery from tissues, highlighting the potential of PTMs as disease biomarkers.
Mesenchymal stromal cells are present in the heart and promote growth of adult stem cells in vitro. - Cytotherapy
For many years the human heart has been considered a terminally differentiated organ with no regenerative potential after injury. Recent studies, however, have cast doubt on this long-standing dogma. The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of and characterize mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in the adult mouse heart. The impact of MSC on growth and differentiation of adult cardiac stem cells (CSC) was also analyzed.A combination of lineage-negative/c-kit-negative (Lin(-)/c-kit(-)) immunoselection with a plastic-adhesion technique was used to isolate cardiac-derived MSC. The differentiation capacity and expression of surface markers were analyzed. To investigate the impact of MSC on growth and differentiation of adult CSC, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP(+)) adult CSC were co-cultured with GFP(-) cardiac-derived MSC.MSC were present in the adult mouse heart and they met the criteria established to define mouse MSC. They expressed surface markers and were able to differentiate, in a controlled manner, into multiple lineages. In addition, cardiac-derived MSC promoted the survival and expansion of adult CSC in vitro.MSC can be isolated from the mouse heart and they promote growth and differentiation of adult CSC. The findings from this study could have a significant beneficial impact on future heart failure treatment. Co-culture and co-implantation of cardiac-derived MSC with adult CSC could provide extensive cardiac regeneration and maintenance of the CSC population after implanted into the heart.
Cardiac computed tomography and quadricuspid aortic valve: a case report. - WMJ : official publication of the State Medical Society of Wisconsin
A quadricuspid aortic valve is rare and often incidentally found by echocardiography, surgically, or on post mortem examination. Aortic regurgitation is common and if severe enough can lead to symptoms of dyspnea. We report a case of a quadricuspid aortic valve, which was found by cardiac multidetector computed tomography during a pre-operative assessment for severe aortic regurgitation.
Lung transplantation with donation after cardiac death donors: long-term follow-up in a single center. - The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery
We sought to examine long-term outcomes at the University of Wisconsin for all lung transplant recipients who received lungs from donation after cardiac death donors since the initiation of this program in 1993.Eighteen (4.2%) of the 424 lung transplantations performed in 406 patients between January 1993 and April 2009 used lungs from donation after cardiac death donors. Outcomes for this recipient cohort were compared with those for recipients who received organs from brain-dead donors.Warm ischemic time (from withdrawal of support to reperfusion of organs) was 30 +/- 17 minutes (11-93 minutes). The patient survival rates in the donation after cardiac death group (DCD group) at 1, 3, and 5 years were 88.1% +/- 7.9%, 81.9% +/- 9.5%, and 81.9% +/- 9.5%, respectively. These survival rates were not different from those of the brain-dead donor group (BDD group, P = .66). The incidence of primary graft dysfunction in the DCD group was similar to that of the BDD group (P = .59). However, the incidence of airway complications was somewhat higher in the DCD group. Freedom from bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome at 1, 3, and 5 years in the DCD group was 80.4% +/- 10.2%, 80.4% +/- 10.2%, and 72.3% +/- 11.9%, respectively, and did not differ from the incidence of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in the BDD group (P = .59).Our data show that the long-term patient and graft survival rates after donation after cardiac death lung transplantation were equivalent to those after brain-dead donor lung transplantation. Our findings suggest that the use of donation after cardiac death donors can safely and substantially expand the donor pool for lung transplantation.Published by Mosby, Inc.
The potential of cardiac allografts from donors after cardiac death at the University of Wisconsin Organ Procurement Organization. - European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery : official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery
The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential availability of hearts from adult donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors within an acceptable hypoxic period.We retrospectively reviewed a donor database from the University of Wisconsin Organ Procurement Organization Donor Tracking System between 2004 and 2006. The DCD population (n=78) was screened using our inclusion criteria for DCD cardiac donor suitability, including warm ischaemic time (WIT) limit of 30 min. In the same period, 70 hearts were donated from brain-dead donors.Of 78 DCD donors, 12 (15%) met our proposed DCD cardiac donor criteria. The mean WIT of these 12 DCD donors was 21 min (range 14-29 min). When inclusion criteria are further narrowed to (1) age <30 years, (2) WIT <20 min and (3) male gender, only two out of 12 met the criteria.Based on our proposed DCD cardiac donor criteria, the potential application of DCD cardiac donors would represent an increase in cardiac donation of 17% (12/70) during the 3-year period. When the criteria were narrowed to the initial 'ideal' case, only two donors met such criteria, suggesting that such 'ideal' DCD donors are rare but they do exist.Copyright 2009 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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600 Highland Ave Madison, WI 53792
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