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Dr. Antonio  Di Carlo  Md image

Dr. Antonio Di Carlo Md

3401 N Broad St
Philadelphia PA 19140
215 073-3133
Medical School: Other - 1996
Accepts Medicare: No
Participates In eRX: Yes
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #:
NPI: 1013934843
Taxonomy Codes:
204F00000X 208600000X

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Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Antonio Di Carlo is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$623.82 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$191.41
HCPCS Code:99233 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$320.99 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$98.47
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$222.39 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$68.72
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$115.22 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$105.34
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$82.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$74.90
HCPCS Code:99213 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$53.36 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$48.75

HCPCS Code Definitions

99213
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of low complexity. Counseling and coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of low to moderate severity. Typically, 15 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99233
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1720063753
Nephrology
18,338
1487641262
Nephrology
1,409
1528016243
Internal Medicine
705
1700800984
Vascular Surgery
554
1790865004
Internal Medicine
537
1720006810
General Surgery
505
1528089166
Diagnostic Radiology
425
1770545485
Nephrology
419
1164449963
Diagnostic Radiology
319
1669460598
Diagnostic Radiology
312
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Di Carlo has made to other doctors

Publications

Patient engagement with research: European population register study. - Health expectations : an international journal of public participation in health care and health policy
Lay involvement in implementation of research evidence into practice may include using research findings to guide individual care, as well as involvement in research processes and policy development. Little is known about the conditions required for such involvement.To assess stroke survivors' research awareness, use of research evidence in their own care and readiness to be involved in research processes.Cross sectional survey of stroke survivors participating in population-based stroke registers in six European centres.The response rate was 74% (481/647). Reasons for participation in register research included responding to clinician request (56%) and to 'give something back' (19%); however, 20% were unaware that they were participating in a stroke register. Research awareness was generally low: 57% did not know the purpose of the register they had been recruited to; 73% reported not having received results from the register they took part in; 60% did not know about any research on stroke care. Few participants (7.6%) used research evidence during their consultations with a doctor. The 34% of participants who were interested in being involved in research were younger, more highly educated and already research aware.Across Europe, stroke survivors already participating in research appear ill informed about stroke research. Researchers, healthcare professionals and patient associations need to improve how research results are communicated to patient populations and research participants, and to raise awareness of the relationship between research evidence and increased quality of care.© 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Stroke knowledge in Italy. - Neurological sciences : official journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology
Stroke knowledge improves public behavior in terms of prevention, symptom recognition, and timely response. Contemporary data on stroke awareness in the Italian general population are lacking. This study surveyed public knowledge of risk factors, warning signs, and proper reactions to stroke among Italian adults. A population-based telephone survey was carried out in a sample of 1,000 residents aged ≥18 years in May-June 2010. The questionnaire included close-ended questions focused on stroke symptoms, risk factors, and treatment options. We examined the prevalence and distribution of stroke knowledge in the community and generated multivariable logistic regression models. Among the 1,000 participants (481 men, mean age 48.8 ± 17.2), only the 55.8 % correctly identified the brain as the affected organ in stroke. The most common risk factor for stroke identified by respondents was hypertension (67.6 %), the most common warning sign was hemiparesis (68.7 %), the 43.5 % could list >1 warning sign. Multivariate analyses indicate that education and previous stroke experience are the only independent predictors of stroke knowledge. Only 26.2 % reported to know about the availability of t-PA treatment. An ambulance would be called by 59 % of respondents in the event of a stroke. Respondents with a high level of education are more likely to call an ambulance in case of stroke. This study provides the first comprehensive data describing stroke knowledge among Italian adults: the general level is suboptimal and is associated only with education and previous family experience of stroke. Public education could potentially improve treatment and prevention.
Complex renal artery aneurysm managed with hand-assisted laparoscopic nephrectomy, ex vivo repair, and autotransplantation. - Annals of vascular surgery
A 58-year-old woman had an incidentally found complex right renal artery aneurysm (RAA) during a clinical work-up for diverticulitis. The aneurysm measured 2.5 cm in diameter and was located at the right renal artery bifurcation. She was hospitalized and underwent hand-assisted laparoscopic nephrectomy with ex vivo repair of the RAA and autotransplantation into the right iliac fossa. The same incision was used to remove the kidney from the retroperitoneum as was used to transplant into the right lower quadrant. She tolerated the procedure well. Her postoperative course was uncomplicated. Hand-assisted laparoscopic nephrectomy with ex vivo repair of a complicated RAA and autotransplantation is feasible and safe.Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Quality indicators in acute stroke care: a prospective observational survey in 13 Italian regions. - Aging clinical and experimental research
Quality monitoring has great relevance in stroke care. The Project "How to guarantee adherence to effective interventions in stroke care" aimed to estimate adherence to acute-phase guidelines in stroke care in Italy.A prospective observational study was performed in 27 hospitals of 13 Italian Regions. Adherence to 15 process indicators was evaluated, comparing also stroke units (SU) with conventional wards. An overall score of care, defined as the sum of achieved indicators, was calculated. A multilevel hierarchical model described performance at patient, hospital and regional level.Overall, 484 consecutive stroke patients (mean age, 73.4 years; 52.7 % males) were included. Total score ranged from 2 to 15 (mean 8.5 ± 2.4). SU patients were more often evaluated with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) within 24 h, had more frequently an assessment of pre- and post-stroke disability, and a CT scan the same or the day after admission. Regional-hospital- and patient-level variability explained, respectively, 25, 34, and 41 % of total score variance. In multivariate models, patients >80 years vs. younger showed a change in total score of -0.45 (95 % CI -0.79 to -0.12), and those with NIHSS ≥14 vs. ≤5 of -0.92 (95 % CI -1.53 to -0.30). A negative change means a worse adjusted average adherence to process indicators. SU admission increased total score of 1.55 (95 % CI 0.52-2.58).Our data confirm the need of quality monitoring in stroke care. Although SU patients showed a better adherence to quality indicators, overall compliance was unsatisfactory.
Reversibility of regorafenib effects in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. - Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology
Multikinase growth inhibitors inhibit their target kinases with varying potency. Patients often require lower doses or therapy breaks due to drug toxicities. To evaluate the effects of drug withdrawal on hepatocellular carcinoma cells after incubation with growth-inhibitory concentrations of regorafenib, cell growth, migration and invasion, and signaling were examined.Cell proliferation, motility, and invasion were analyzed by MTT, wound healing, and invasion assays, respectively, and MAPK pathway protein markers were analyzed by Western blot.After regorafenib removal, cell growth, migration, and invasion recovered. Repeated drug exposure resulted in changes in cell growth patterns. Recovery could be blocked by sub-growth-inhibitory concentrations of either doxorubicin or vitamin K1. Recovery of growth was associated with increased phospho-JNK, phospho-p38, and phospho-STAT3 levels. The recovery of growth, migration, and signaling were blocked by a JNK inhibitor.Removal of regorafenib from growth-inhibited cells resulted in a JNK-dependent recovery of growth and migration.
Evidence of cross-reactive immunity to 2009 pandemic influenza A virus in workers seropositive to swine H1N1 influenza viruses circulating in Italy. - PloS one
Pigs play a key epidemiologic role in the ecology of influenza A viruses (IAVs) emerging from animal hosts and transmitted to humans. Between 2008 and 2010, we investigated the health risk of occupational exposure to swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in Italy, during the emergence and spread of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic (H1N1pdm) virus.Serum samples from 123 swine workers (SWs) and 379 control subjects (Cs), not exposed to pig herds, were tested by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay against selected SIVs belonging to H1N1 (swH1N1), H1N2 (swH1N2) and H3N2 (swH3N2) subtypes circulating in the study area. Potential cross-reactivity between swine and human IAVs was evaluated by testing sera against recent, pandemic and seasonal, human influenza viruses (H1N1 and H3N2 antigenic subtypes). Samples tested against swH1N1 and H1N1pdm viruses were categorized into sera collected before (n. 84 SWs; n. 234 Cs) and after (n. 39 SWs; n. 145 Cs) the pandemic peak. HI-antibody titers ≥10 were considered positive. In both pre-pandemic and post-pandemic peak subperiods, SWs showed significantly higher swH1N1 seroprevalences when compared with Cs (52.4% vs. 4.7% and 59% vs. 9.7%, respectively). Comparable HI results were obtained against H1N1pdm antigen (58.3% vs. 7.7% and 59% vs. 31.7%, respectively). No differences were found between HI seroreactivity detected in SWs and Cs against swH1N2 (33.3% vs. 40.4%) and swH3N2 (51.2 vs. 55.4%) viruses. These findings indicate the occurrence of swH1N1 transmission from pigs to Italian SWs.A significant increase of H1N1pdm seroprevalences occurred in the post-pandemic peak subperiod in the Cs (p<0.001) whereas SWs showed no differences between the two subperiods, suggesting a possible occurrence of cross-protective immunity related to previous swH1N1 infections. These data underline the importance of risk assessment and occupational health surveillance activities aimed at early detection and control of SIVs with pandemic potential in humans.
Variations in acute stroke care and the impact of organised care on survival from a European perspective: the European Registers of Stroke (EROS) investigators. - Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry
The need for stroke care is escalating with an ageing population, yet methods to estimate the delivery of effective care across countries are not standardised or robust. Associations between quality and intensity of care and stroke outcomes are often assumed but have not been clearly demonstrated.To examine variations in acute care processes across six European populations and investigate associations between the delivery of care and survival.Data were obtained from population-based stroke registers of six centres in France, Lithuania, UK, Spain, Poland and Italy between 2004 and 2006 with follow-up for 1 year. Variations in the delivery of care (stroke unit, multidisciplinary team and acute drug treatments) were analysed adjusting for case mix and sociodemographic factors using logistic regression methods. Unadjusted and adjusted survival probabilities were estimated and stratified by levels of Organised Care Index.Of 1918 patients with a first-ever stroke registered, 30.7% spent more than 50% of their hospital stay in a stroke unit (13.9-65.4%) among centres with a stroke unit available. The percentage of patients assessed by a stroke physician varied between 7.1% and 96.6%. There were significant variations after adjustment for confounders, in the organisation of care across populations. Significantly higher probabilities of survival (p<0.01) were associated with increased organisational care.This European study demonstrated associations between delivery of care and stroke outcomes. The implementation of evidence-based interventions is suboptimal and understanding better ways to implement these interventions in different healthcare settings should be a priority for health systems.
Monitoring the implementation of the State-Regional Council agreement 03/02/2005 as to the management of acute stroke events: a comparison of the Italian regional legislations. - Neurological sciences : official journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology
Access to effective acute stroke services is a crucial factor to reduce stroke-related death and disability, but is limited in different parts of Italy. Our study addresses this inequality across the Italian regions by examining the regional legislations issued to adopt and implement the State-Regional Council agreement 03/02/2005 as to the acute stroke management. All decrees and resolutions as to acute stroke were collected from each region and examined by the means of a check list including quantitative and qualitative characteristics, selected in accordance with the recommendations from the State-Regional Council document. Each completed check list was then sent to each regional reference person, who filled in the section on the implementation of the indications and compliance, with the collaboration of stroke specialists if necessary. The study was carried out from November 2009 to September 2010. The documents and information were collected from 19 regions. Our survey revealed disparities both in terms of number of decrees and resolutions and of topics covered by the regional legislations about stroke care. Most legislations lacked practical and economical details. This feedback from national and regional stroke regulations revealed a need of more concrete indications. Involvement of various stakeholders (legislators, consumers, providers) might possibly ensure that policies are actually adopted, implemented and maintained. Although considerable challenges are present to the development of standard and optimal stroke care more widely across Italian regions, the potential gains from such developments are substantial.
Frailty syndrome and the risk of vascular dementia: the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging. - Alzheimer's & dementia : the journal of the Alzheimer's Association
Frailty is a clinical syndrome generally associated with a greater risk for adverse outcomes such as falls, disability, institutionalization, and death. Cognition and dementia have already been considered as components of frailty, but the role of frailty as a possible determinant of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD) has been poorly investigated. We estimated the predictive role of frailty syndrome on incident dementia and its subtypes in a nondemented, Italian, older population.We evaluated 2581 individuals recruited from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging sample population consisting of 5632 subjects aged 65 to 84 years and with a 3.9-year median follow-up. A phenotype of frailty according to a modified measurement of Cardiovascular Health Study criteria was operationalized. Dementia, AD, and VaD were classified using current published criteria.Over a 3.5-year follow-up, 65 of 2581 (2.5%) older subjects, 16 among 252 frail individuals (6.3%), of which 9 were affected by VaD (3.6%), developed overall dementia. In a proportional hazards model, frailty syndrome was associated with a significantly increased risk of overall dementia (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.85; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-3.40) and, in particular, VaD (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.68; 95% confidence interval: 1.16-7.17). The risk of AD or other types of dementia did not significantly change in frail individuals in comparison with subjects without frailty syndrome.In our large population-based sample, frailty syndrome was a short-term predictor of overall dementia and VaD.Copyright © 2013 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Effects of low concentrations of regorafenib and sorafenib on human HCC cell AFP, migration, invasion, and growth in vitro. - Journal of cellular physiology
Sorafenib was shown in clinical trial to enhance survival in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, but with minimal tumor shrinkage. To correlate several indices of HCC growth at various drug concentrations, HCC cells were grown in various low concentrations of two multikinase inhibitors, regorafenib (Stivarga) and sorafenib (Nexavar) and their effects were examined on alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), cell growth, migration, and invasion. In two AFP positive human HCC cell lines, AFP was inhibited at 0.1-1 µM drug concentrations. Cell migration and invasion were also inhibited at similar low drug concentrations. However, 10-fold higher drug concentrations were required to inhibit cell growth in both AFP positive and negative cells. To investigate this concentration discrepancy of effects, cells were then grown for prolonged times and sub-cultured in low drug concentrations and then their growth was re-tested. The growth in these drug-exposed cells was found to be slower than cells without prior drug exposure and they were also more sensitive to subsequent drug challenge. Evidence was also found for changes in cell signaling pathways in these slow-growth cells. Low multikinase inhibitor concentrations thus modulate several aspects of HCC cell biology.Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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3401 N Broad St Philadelphia, PA 19140
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