Docality.com Logo
 
Dr. Brian  Griffith  Md image

Dr. Brian Griffith Md

202 S Park St
Madison WI 53715
608 175-5950
Medical School: University Of Michigan Medical School - 1997
Accepts Medicare: Yes
Participates In eRX: No
Participates In PQRS: Yes
Participates In EHR: No
License #: 63303
NPI: 1013035310
Taxonomy Codes:
207RC0200X 207RP1001X

Request Appointment Information

Awards & Recognitions

About Us

Practice Philosophy

Conditions

Dr. Brian Griffith is associated with these group practices

Procedure Pricing

HCPCS Code Description Average Price Average Price
Allowed By Medicare
HCPCS Code:31629 Description:Bronchoscopy/needle bx each Average Price:$1,479.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$196.47
HCPCS Code:32422 Description:Thoracentesis w/tube insert Average Price:$974.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$102.58
HCPCS Code:31628 Description:Bronchoscopy/lung bx each Average Price:$1,001.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$185.95
HCPCS Code:76942 Description:Echo guide for biopsy Average Price:$715.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$32.15
HCPCS Code:31622 Description:Dx bronchoscope/wash Average Price:$753.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$142.00
HCPCS Code:99291 Description:Critical care first hour Average Price:$794.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$212.53
HCPCS Code:36556 Description:Insert non-tunnel cv cath Average Price:$574.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$120.27
HCPCS Code:99292 Description:Critical care addl 30 min Average Price:$360.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$106.43
HCPCS Code:99223 Description:Initial hospital care Average Price:$364.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$190.60
HCPCS Code:31500 Description:Insert emergency airway Average Price:$264.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$108.64
HCPCS Code:94060 Description:Evaluation of wheezing Average Price:$177.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$56.69
HCPCS Code:94729 Description:C02/membane diffuse capacity Average Price:$153.09 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$48.95
HCPCS Code:94726 Description:Pulm funct tst plethysmograp Average Price:$153.27 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$49.31
HCPCS Code:94620 Description:Pulmonary stress test/simple Average Price:$160.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$56.92
HCPCS Code:99233 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$199.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$97.69
HCPCS Code:94010 Description:Breathing capacity test Average Price:$105.95 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$32.25
HCPCS Code:99232 Description:Subsequent hospital care Average Price:$140.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$68.19
HCPCS Code:99205 Description:Office/outpatient visit new Average Price:$205.91 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$158.85
HCPCS Code:94070 Description:Evaluation of wheezing Average Price:$61.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$27.87
HCPCS Code:99215 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$134.88 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$104.37
HCPCS Code:36415 Description:Routine venipuncture Average Price:$30.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$3.00
HCPCS Code:94726 Description:Pulm funct tst plethysmograp Average Price:$36.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$11.96
HCPCS Code:94729 Description:C02/membane diffuse capacity Average Price:$27.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$7.99
HCPCS Code:94060 Description:Evaluation of wheezing Average Price:$30.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.29
HCPCS Code:Q2038 Description:Fluzone vacc, 3 yrs & >, im Average Price:$22.50 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$12.16
HCPCS Code:94010 Description:Breathing capacity test Average Price:$15.00 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$7.98
HCPCS Code:99214 Description:Office/outpatient visit est Average Price:$78.89 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$74.27
HCPCS Code:G0008 Description:Admin influenza virus vac Average Price:$24.30 Average Price Allowed
By Medicare:
$20.16

HCPCS Code Definitions

31500
Intubation, endotracheal, emergency procedure
31628
Bronchoscopy, rigid or flexible, including fluoroscopic guidance, when performed; with transbronchial lung biopsy(s), single lobe
31622
Bronchoscopy, rigid or flexible, including fluoroscopic guidance, when performed; diagnostic, with cell washing, when performed (separate procedure)
31629
Bronchoscopy, rigid or flexible, including fluoroscopic guidance, when performed; with transbronchial needle aspiration biopsy(s), trachea, main stem and/or lobar bronchus(i)
36556
Insertion of non-tunneled centrally inserted central venous catheter; age 5 years or older
76942
Ultrasonic guidance for needle placement (eg, biopsy, aspiration, injection, localization device), imaging supervision and interpretation
94010
Spirometry, including graphic record, total and timed vital capacity, expiratory flow rate measurement(s), with or without maximal voluntary ventilation
94010
Spirometry, including graphic record, total and timed vital capacity, expiratory flow rate measurement(s), with or without maximal voluntary ventilation
94060
Bronchodilation responsiveness, spirometry as in 94010, pre- and post-bronchodilator administration
94060
Bronchodilation responsiveness, spirometry as in 94010, pre- and post-bronchodilator administration
94070
Bronchospasm provocation evaluation, multiple spirometric determinations as in 94010, with administered agents (eg, antigen[s], cold air, methacholine)
94620
Pulmonary stress testing; simple (eg, 6-minute walk test, prolonged exercise test for bronchospasm with pre- and post-spirometry and oximetry)
94726
Plethysmography for determination of lung volumes and, when performed, airway resistance
94726
Plethysmography for determination of lung volumes and, when performed, airway resistance
94729
Diffusing capacity (eg, carbon monoxide, membrane) (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
99205
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of a new patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 60 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
94729
Diffusing capacity (eg, carbon monoxide, membrane) (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure)
99214
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 25 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99215
Office or other outpatient visit for the evaluation and management of an established patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the presenting problem(s) are of moderate to high severity. Typically, 40 minutes are spent face-to-face with the patient and/or family.
99223
Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99232
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99233
Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient's and/or family's needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient's hospital floor or unit.
99291
Critical care, evaluation and management of the critically ill or critically injured patient; first 30-74 minutes
99292
Critical care, evaluation and management of the critically ill or critically injured patient; each additional 30 minutes (List separately in addition to code for primary service)
G0008
Administration of influenza virus vaccine
Q2038
Influenza virus vaccine, split virus, when administered to individuals 3 years of age and older, for intramuscular use (fluzone)

Medical Malpractice Cases

None Found

Medical Board Sanctions

None Found

Referrals

NPI
Doctor Name
Specialty
Count
1306944715
Pulmonary Disease
1,706
1477651891
Pulmonary Disease
1,644
1730283805
Diagnostic Radiology
1,610
1184716060
Hematology/Oncology
1,599
1588691950
Diagnostic Radiology
966
1285662015
Cardiovascular Disease (Cardiology)
799
1316907934
Internal Medicine
780
1730193046
Hematology/Oncology
623
1114960903
Diagnostic Radiology
538
1043260995
Family Practice
513
*These referrals represent the top 10 that Dr. Griffith has made to other doctors

Publications

Calling for collaboration: piloting smartphones to discover differences between users and devices. - Teaching and learning in medicine
Healthcare technologies and patient care have evolved rapidly. Healthcare communication techniques and technologies have lagged.This pilot study was conducted at Duke University Hospital to investigate the benefits of using smartphones among healthcare team members to promote efficient and effective patient care.This study used a pre-post implementation survey with an educational intervention. Teams (physicians, patient resource managers, physician assistants, and nurses) from medicine and surgery were randomly assigned a smartphone. A validated 28-question survey was used to assess user experience (7-point Likert scale, with 7 indicating more reliable, strongly agree, and faster). Participants were encouraged to attend focus groups to provide feedback on survey content and overall experience. Facilitators used guiding questions and transcripts were used for qualitative analysis.Eighty-nine matched pre- and postsurveys were analyzed. Postimplementation data results declined for a majority of items, although remained favorable. This suggests the reality of smartphone use did not live up to expectations but was still considered an improvement over the current paging system. Differences by device and user were found, such as the iPhone being easier to use and the BlackBerry more professional; nonphysicians were more concerned about training and the sterility of the device. Themes elicited from focus groups included challenges of the current paging system, text message content, device ease of use and utility, service coverage, and professionalism.Participants in this study recognized the benefit of using smartphones to reach team members in a timely and convenient manner while having access to beneficial applications. Lessons were learned for future implementations with more favorable experiences for participants. Perhaps most striking was the shared acknowledgment that the current system doesn't work well and an understanding of why.
Comparison of backbone modification in protein β-sheets by α→γ residue replacement and α-residue methylation. - Organic & biomolecular chemistry
The mimicry of protein tertiary structure by oligomers with unnatural backbones is a significant contemporary research challenge. Among common elements of secondary structure found in natural proteins, sheets have proven the most difficult to address. Here, we report the systematic comparison of different strategies for peptide backbone modification in β-sheets with the goal of identifying the best method for replacing a multi-stranded sheet in a protein tertiary fold. The most effective sheet modifications examined led to native-like tertiary folding behavior with a thermodynamic folded stability comparable to the prototype protein on which the modified backbones are based.
Tobacco dependence curricula in US osteopathic medical schools: a follow-up study. - The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association
Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of illness and death in the United States. A 1998 survey of US osteopathic medical schools identified deficiencies in tobacco dependence curricula.To assess the current content and extent of tobacco dependence education and intervention skills in US osteopathic medical school curricula.An electronic survey.Osteopathic medical schools with students enrolled for the 2009-2010 academic year.Twenty-seven osteopathic medical school deans or their designated administrators.Reported instruction in 7 basic science and 6 clinical science content areas (elective or required) and hours of tobacco dependence education were assessed and compared with the 1998 data.The mean (standard deviation) number of content areas reported as covered in 2010 was 10.6 (2.3) (6.1 [1.2] basic science areas, 4.6 [1.3] clinical science areas). Seventeen of 27 respondents (63%) reported that smokeless tobacco content was covered at their school, and 9 of 27 (33%) reported that the stages of change counseling technique was covered. Compared with 1998, a significant increase was noted in the percentage of schools covering tobacco dependence (92.6% in 2010 compared with 57.9% in 1998, P=.0002). Reported hours of tobacco dependence instruction were also significantly higher in 2010 compared with those in 1998 (Fisher exact test, P<.05). No statistically significant changes were found in the proportion of schools covering all 13 content areas (15.7% vs 22.2%), the proportion covering motivational interviewing in detail (26.3% vs 33.3%), or the proportion requiring curricula on smokeless tobacco (57.9% vs 59.3%).Osteopathic medical school respondents reported more instruction on tobacco dependence in 2010 compared with those in 1998. However, some important basic science and clinical science content areas are not being adequately taught in US osteopathic medical schools.
Handoffs in the era of duty hours reform: a focused review and strategy to address changes in the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Common Program Requirements. - Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
With changes in the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Common Program Requirements related to transitions in care effective July 1, 2011, sponsoring institutions and training programs must develop a common structure for transitions in care as well as comprehensive curricula to teach and evaluate patient handoffs. In response to these changes, within the Duke University Health System, the resident-led Graduate Medical Education Patient Safety and Quality Council performed a focused review of the handoffs literature and developed a plan for comprehensive handoff education and evaluation for residents and fellows at Duke. The authors present the results of their focused review, concentrating on the three areas of new ACGME expectations--structure, education, and evaluation--and describe how their findings informed the broader initiative to comprehensively address transitions in care managed by residents and fellows. The process of developing both institution-level and program-level initiatives is reviewed, including the development of an interdisciplinary minimal data set for handoff core content, training and education programs, and an evaluation strategy. The authors believe the final plan fully addresses both Duke's internal goals and the revised ACGME Common Program Requirements and may serve as a model for other institutions to comprehensively address transitions in care and to incorporate resident and fellow leadership into a broad, health-system-level quality improvement initiative.
Self-rated health in rural Appalachia: health perceptions are incongruent with health status and health behaviors. - BMC public health
Appalachia is characterized by poor health behaviors, poor health status, and health disparities. Recent interventions have not demonstrated much success in improving health status or reducing health disparities in the Appalachian region. Since one's perception of personal health precedes his or her health behaviors, the purpose of this project was to evaluate the self-rated health of Appalachian adults in relation to objective health status and current health behaviors.Appalachian adults (n = 1,576) were surveyed regarding health behaviors - soda consumer (drink ≥ 355 ml/d), or non-consumer (drink < 355 ml/d), fast food consumer (eating fast food ≥ 3 times/wk) or healthy food consumer (eating fast food < 3 times/wk), smoking (smoker or non-smoker), exercise (exerciser > 30 min > 1 d/wk) and sedentary (exercise < 30 min 1 d/wk), blood pressure medication (yes, no), and self-rated health. Blood pressure was measured through auscultation and serum cholesterol measured via needle prick. Weight status was based on BMI: normal weight (NW ≥ 18.5 and < 25.0), overweight (OW ≥ 25.0 and < 30.0), and obese (OB ≥ 30.0). Jaccard Binary Similarity coefficients, odds ratios, chi-square, and prevalence ratios were calculated to evaluate the relationships among self-rated health, objective health status, and health behaviors. Significance was set at p < 0.05.Respondents reported being healthy, while being sedentary (65%), hypertensive (76%), overweight (73%), or hyperlipidemic (79%). Between 57% and 66% of the respondents who considered themselves healthy had at least two disease conditions or poor health behaviors. Jaccard Binary Similarity coefficients and odds ratios showed the probability of reporting being healthy when having a disease condition or poor health behavior was high.The association between self-rated health and poor health indicators in Appalachian adults is distorted. The public health challenge is to formulate messages and programs about health and health needs which take into account the current distortion about health in Appalachia and the cultural context in which this distortion was shaped.
NOX enzymes and pulmonary disease. - Antioxidants & redox signaling
The primary function of the lung is to facilitate the transfer of molecular oxygen (O(2); dioxygen) from the atmosphere to the systemic circulation. In addition to its essential role in aerobic metabolism, O(2) serves as the physiologic terminal acceptor of electron transfer catalyzed by the NADPH oxidase (NOX) family of oxidoreductases. The evolution of the lungs and circulatory systems in vertebrates was accompanied by increasing diversification of NOX family enzymes, suggesting adaptive roles for NOX-derived reactive oxygen species in normal physiology. However, this adaptation may paradoxically carry detrimental consequences in the setting of overwhelming/persistent environmental stressors, both infectious and noninfectious, and during the process of aging. Here, we review current understanding of NOX enzymes in normal lung physiology and their pathophysiologic roles in a number of pulmonary diseases, including lung infections, acute lung injury, pulmonary arterial hypertension, obstructive lung disorders, fibrotic lung disease, and lung cancer.
A novel Bcl-2 small molecule inhibitor 4-(3-methoxy-phenylsulfannyl)-7-nitro-benzofurazan-3-oxide (MNB)-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. - Annals of hematology
A novel small molecule inhibitor, 4-(3-methoxy-phenylsulfannyl)-7-nitro-benzofurazan-3-oxide (MNB), competes with the Bak BH3 peptide to bind Bcl-2 protein with a binding affinity of IC(50) = 0.70 microM, as assessed by a fluorescence polarization based binding assay. HL-60 cells express the highest levels of Bcl-2 among the cell lines examined. Treated with 5 microM of MNB only for 6 h, 85% of HL-60 cells were detected to undergo apoptosis. Pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, blocks MNB-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. Caspase-2, caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-8, caspase-9, and PARP activation were observed at as early as 4 to 6 h of MNB treatment. In addition, it has been confirmed that the caspase-3 specific inhibitor, Z-DEVD-FMK, blocks the activation of caspase-8 in MNB-treated HL-60 cells. MNB treatment does not change Bcl-2 or Bax expression level in HL-60 cells, but causes Bid cleavage. Further experiments have illustrated that MNB inhibits the heterodimerization of Bcl-2 with Bax or Bid, reduces the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsimt), and induces cytochrome c release from mitochondria in HL-60 cells. These results suggest that MNB induces apoptosis in HL-60 by inhibiting the heterodimerization of Bcl-2 with pro-apoptosis Bcl-2 members, resulting in a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release, activation of caspases and PARP; it is a caspase-dependent process in which the activation of caspase-8 is dependent on the mitochondrial apoptosis signal transduction pathway. MNB prolongs the life spans of HL-60 bearing mice, potently kills fresh AML and ALL cells, indicating that it has the potential to be developed to treat leukemia.
Bioinformatics-based discovery and characterization of an AKT-selective inhibitor 9-chloro-2-methylellipticinium acetate (CMEP) in breast cancer cells. - Cancer letters
AKT is a promising target for anticancer drug development. In this work, a bioinformatics approach was applied to search for AKT inhibitors based on the correlation analysis between phospho-Ser473 AKT expression level and the antiproliferative data of NCI small molecule compounds against NCI 60 cancer cell lines, the candidate compounds were then subject to AKT kinase assay. The possible effects of potent compound on PI3K/AKT, PDK1, and MAPK, its antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects on breast cancer cells which have high-levels of AKT activation were assessed by Western blot analysis, cell viability assay, and apoptosis assay. One compound, CMEP (NSC632855, 9-chloro-2-methylellipticinium acetate) was identified with all three correlation algorithm, Pearson's, Sperman's, and Kendall's, showing a high-ranked correlation coefficient. CMEP inhibits only AKT, but does not inhibit PI3K, PDK1, or MAPK. CMEP also inhibits heregulin-induced AKT activation, does not inhibit heregulin-induced MAPK activation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Increased concentrations of ATP reverse the AKT inhibitory effect of CMEP. CMEP inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells which have high-levels of AKT activation and lack functional PTEN; however, CMEP only shows a minimal activity in NIH3T3 cells which do not have AKT activation. In conclusion, a lead compound CMEP, as an AKT selective inhibitor has been identified started with a bioinformatics-based approach. CMEP inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in cancer cells which have high-levels of AKT activation and lack PTEN or harbor PTEN mutation.
Fossa navicularis reconstruction: impact of stricture length on outcomes and assessment of extended meatotomy (first stage Johanson) maneuver. - The Journal of urology
We evaluated the significance of stricture length and severity on the outcome of fossa navicularis reconstruction. We also determined the efficacy and usefulness of an extended meatotomy (first stage Johanson) salvage maneuver in refractory cases.Our 7-year experience with the surgical management of distal urethral strictures involving the fossa navicularis was reviewed. Stricture length, reconstructive method and outcomes were assessed in 40 consecutive cases performed at our institution from 1997 to 2003. Men undergoing flap or graft onlay reconstruction were divided into group 1-short, isolated fossa navicularis strictures (2.5 cm or less) and group 2-long pendulous urethral strictures (greater than 2.5 cm) extending into the fossa navicularis. Men treated with extended meatotomy for complex and/or reoperative distal strictures comprised group 3.Average followup was 52 months (range 28 to 81). The majority of men with short isolated fossa navicularis strictures (group 1 average length 2.2 cm, range 1.5 to 2.5) had successful onlay reconstruction (10 of 11, 91%). Those with longer strictures (group 2 average length 7.4 cm, range 4 to 16) had significantly poorer outcomes with onlay reconstruction (7 of 13, 54%, p <0.05). Failures presented in a delayed manner with recurrent stenosis of the distal segment. Extended meatotomy (group 3) proved to be successful in 14 of 16 men (87%) with complex or reoperative strictures.Stricture length influences the outcome of distal urethroplasty. Onlay repair via a penile fasciocutaneous flap technique is reliable for short perimeatal strictures, but is less well suited for longer distal strictures. Extended meatotomy appears to be a highly effective salvage maneuver for complicated strictures of the fossa navicularis.
Gossypol induces apoptosis in human PC-3 prostate cancer cells by modulating caspase-dependent and caspase-independent cell death pathways. - Life sciences
The rate of gossypol-induced apoptosis does not correlate very well with the same dose of gossypol-induced cell growth inhibition, indicating an anti-proliferative effect of gossypol. Using a co-immunoprecipitation assay, it was observed that the level of Bcl-X(L) protein bound to Bax was clearly lower than that of Bcl-2 protein at 5 micro M of gossypol treatment, and the level of Bim protein bound to Bcl-X(L) was lowered at 20 micro M of gossypol treatment for 24 h, implicating that gossypol inhibits the heterodimerization of Bcl-X(L) with Bax and Bim. Gossypol-induced apoptosis is partly suppressed by as low as 0.5 micro M, but not abolished by as high as 50 micro M of a broad range caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, suggesting that gossypol-induced apoptosis is both caspase-dependent and -independent. Furthermore, the release of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), which triggers caspase-independent apoptosis, from mitochondria to cytosol was observed in PC-3 cells exposed to gossypol treatment. In conclusion, gossypol inhibits the proliferation and induces apoptosis in PC-3 cells. Gossypol-induced apoptosis is, at least, through inhibiting the heterodimerization of Bcl-X(L)/Bcl-2 with pro-apoptosis molecules, followed by a caspase-dependent and -independent process which involves the release of AIF from the mitochondria to cytosol.

Map & Directions

202 S Park St Madison, WI 53715
View Directions In Google Maps

Nearby Doctors

202 S Park St
Madison, WI 53715
608 176-6236
202 S Park St
Madison, WI 53715
608 178-8144
202 S Park St
Madison, WI 53715
608 176-6667
1 S Park St
Madison, WI 53715
608 872-2050
330 E Lakeside St
Madison, WI 53715
608 423-3700
202 S Park St
Madison, WI 53715
608 176-6236
202 S Park St
Madison, WI 53715
608 176-6236
700 S Park St Dean St. Mary's Outpatient Center
Madison, WI 53715
608 602-2900
1025 Regent St
Madison, WI 53715
608 822-2000